‘Water Windfall’ Found in Drought-Stricken California...

Jun 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment California’s Central Valley has three times more freshwater in underground aquifers than previously thought. By Bobby Magill / Climate Central  VIA ALTERNET California’s Central Valley has three times more freshwater in underground aquifers than previously thought, drinking water that could help the state weather future drought and fortify itself against a changing climate, according to a new Stanford University study. But tapping that water, locked thousands of feet beneath the ground, will be expensive and comes with an enormous risk — it could cause the valley floor to sink, according to the study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Sinking land in the Central Valley is threatening roads, homes and other infrastructure, and reduces the amount of water some aquifers can hold. California’s parched Central Valley in 2014. Credit: Stuart Rankin/NASA/flickr...

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NOW RESIDENTS OF THE U.S.’S SECOND LARGEST PIG PRODUCING STATE CAN SEE WHERE THE WASTE FLOWS...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Emery Dalesio Manure is sprayed on a North Carolina field.   Livestock farming — especially hog and poultry farming — is big business in North Carolina. The country’s second-largest pig producer and third-largest chicken producer, North Carolina has thousands of farming operations clustered throughout the state. And while those farms produce billions of dollars in economic revenue, they also produce something far more sinister: millions of tons of animal waste that can make its way into the air or water, polluting nearby communities and watersheds. In an effort to help spotlight the issue of animal farming and waste disposal in North Carolina, Waterkeeper Alliance and the Environmental Working Group have teamed up to release a first-of-its-kind mapping project, detailing exactly where North Carolina’s hog and poultry...

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FRACKING PRODUCES TONS OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE. WHAT SHOULD WE DO WITH IT?...

Jun 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Byproducts of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, create radioactive waste like the truckload shown here in West Virginia. BIll Hughes down in the dumps By Jie Jenny Zou   GRIST Cross-posted from Center for Public Integrity The Marcellus Shale has transformed the Appalachian Basin into an energy juggernaut. Even amid a recent drilling slowdown, regional daily production averages enough natural gas to power more than 200,000 U.S. homes for a year. But the rise of hydraulic fracturing over the past decade has created another boom: tons of radioactive materials experts call an “orphan” waste stream. No federal agency fully regulates oil and gas drilling byproducts — which include brine, sludge, rock, and soiled equipment — leaving tracking and handling to states that may be reluctant to alienate energy interests. “Nobody can say how much of...

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DRY TAPS AND LAGOONS OF SEWAGE: WHAT AMERICA’S WATER CRISIS LOOKS LIKE...

Jun 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] A new report finds that safe water and sanitation are increasingly unaffordable for millions of Americans. By Zoë CarpenterTwitter On January 28, 2016, Porshe Loyd uses bottled water to wash her three-week-old son, LeAndrew, in a baby bather in the kitchen sink at their home in Flint, Michigan. (Todd McInturf / The Detroit News via AP) In Lowndes County, Alabama, thousands of people live with raw sewage in their yards or near lagoons of human waste. Only 20 percent of the county’s residents have access to municipal sewers, leaving them responsible for maintaining their own septic systems. The soil in the former cotton-producing region is made of clay, which doesn’t drain well, and above-ground septic systems can cost up to $30,000—an impossible sum for many residents, 27 percent of whom live below the poverty...

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FREE TRADE WILL KILL PROGRESS ON CLIMATE CHANGE, 450 GROUPS WARN CONGRESS...

Jun 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Nika Knight, Common Dreams   ECO-WATCH  \Warning against dangers to “workers, communities and our environment,” more than 450 environmental advocacy groups called on Congress to reject the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Specifically warning against the Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) provisions, which allow multinational corporations sue nations in private, clandestine tribunals for passing laws they don’t like, the groups sent a letter Monday that stated: “We strongly urge you to stand up for healthy communities, clean air and water, Indigenous peoples, property rights and a stable climate by committing to vote no on the TPP and asking the U.S. Trade Representative to remove from TTIP any provision that empowers corporations to challenge government policies in extrajudicial tribunals.” “By empowering many more firms to launch ISDS cases against the U.S.,” environmental...

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AFRICAN WOMEN ARE BREAKING THEIR BACKS TO GET WATER FOR THEIR FAMILIES...

Jun 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Energy and Environment By Darryl Fears A woman gathers water from a dam for use at her home in Qunu, South Africa. (Schalk van Zuydam/AP) Four years after the United Nations announced that it cut the number of people without access to cleaner water by half, getting to that water is still a major hardship for much of sub-Saharan Africa, a new analysis shows. More than two-thirds of the region’s population reported that they leave home to collect water and haul it as far as two football fields, and that backbreaking work falls mostly on women and children in 24 countries carrying buckets that weigh as much as 40 pounds each. The result, says the analysis released Wednesday and published in the journal PLOS One, is “fatigue, musculoskeletal damage and early degenerative bone...

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Hillary Clinton Tried to Push Fracking on Other Nations When She Was Secretary of State, New Emails Reveal...

Jun 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment The State Department hoped Poland could be a “laboratory for testing whether U.S. success in developing shale gas can be repeated in a different country.” By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addresses the audience during the George C. Marshall Foundation Award presentation at the State Department in Washington, D.C., Oct. 16, 2009. DoD photo by Cherie Cullen Photo Credit: Cherie Cullen/U.S. Department of Defense Emails obtained by The Intercept from the State Department reveal new details of Hillary Clinton’s behind-the-scenes efforts to export fracking—a method of extracting oil and natural gas from underground shale deposits—to foreign countries during her tenure as Secretary of State. The emails, acquired through a Freedom of Information Act request, could be particularly damning in light of Clinton’s recent attempts to ally herself with the...

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MAKING SENSE OF DWP REFORM IN CALIFORNIA...

Jun 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] A SUMMARY REPORT: MAKING SENSE OF DWP REFORM A CONFERENCE AND PANEL DISCUSSION HELD TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 2016 RONALD F. DEATON CIVIC AUDITORIUM n LAPD HEADQUARTERS PRESENTED BY THE PAT BROWN INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS CAL STATE LA “These forums can be our city’s second Mulholland moment when our city reimagines the kind of DWP our city needs. This moment needs to be not only about the things we do, but how we do them.” —Mayor Eric Garcetti PAT BROWN INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS 1 The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (DWP) has often been the subject of reform efforts. DWP reform is once again on the city’s agenda. Customer service, utility rates, budget transfers, hiring and other labor issues have all generated discussion and debate. There is a great deal...

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33 OTHER U.S. CITIES HAVE CHEATED WATER TESTS THAT DETECT LEAD...

Jun 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Guardian tried to obtain “water testing documents” from 81 cities and 43 offered information. The tricks used by officials include practices such as removing aerators, pre-flushing pipes, and running water slowly. All these practices potentially reduce the amount of lead that shows up in water samples. Sometimes officials didn’t test water in what they determined were “high-risk homes.” Related: BREAKING: What Flint officials knew about the poisoned water, and when In Michigan and New Hampshire, departments allowed employees to re-sample and toss out “results with high lead levels.” In Chicago and Philadelphia, officials requested that employees “test water safety in their own homes.” Some cities, citing security risk concerns, said they didn’t know where lead pipes were or didn’t conduct testing in the mandatory amount of homes with lead pipes. As a...

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THE BATTLE OVER PUBLIC DRINKING WATER HAS JUST BEGUN...

May 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha PageCLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Don Ryan An initiative to block Nestle from bottling water in Cascade Locks, Oregon, shown here, passed with 70 percent of the vote this month.   It’s easy to hate Nestle’s bottled water business. The multinational behemoth recently fought a case at the Maine Supreme Court to continue filling Poland Spring bottles — at the same rate the locals pay for tap water. Environmental groups and locals had challenged whether the water company had the authority to sign a 25-year, 603,000 gallon/day contract for public water. The groups lost. Then the company announced it would build a bottled water facility in Phoenix, of all places, which prompted local outcry and a change.org petition to get Nestle out of the desert city, which pipes nearly all its water...

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HOW THE WATER CRISIS IN THE WEST RENEWED THE DEBATE ABOUT THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DAMS...

May 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Abrahm Lustgarten / ProPublica   VIA TRUTHDIG     Glen Canyon Dam is located in Page, Arizona. (Jacqueline Poggi / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) This piece originally ran on ProPublica. Wedged between Arizona and Utah, less than 20 miles up river from the Grand Canyon, a soaring concrete wall nearly the height of two football fields blocks the flow of the Colorado River. There, at Glen Canyon Dam, the river is turned back on itself, drowning more than 200 miles of plasma-red gorges and replacing the Colorado’s free-spirited rapids with an immense lake of flat, still water called Lake Powell, the nation’s second largest reserve. When Glen Canyon Dam was built — in the middle of the last century — giant dams were championed as a silver bullet promising to elevate the American...

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HOUSE PASSES ZIKA BILL THAT WON’T FIGHT THE VIRUS BUT MAY PUT MORE PESTICIDES IN YOUR WATER...

May 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Despite the fact that Congress has yet to pass a fully-funded Zika emergency bill, the House of Representatives passed the Zika Vector Control Act Tuesday evening, a bill ostensibly aimed at helping to fight the potential spread of the Zika virus throughout the United States. But House Democrats and environmental organizations are crying foul, arguing that the bill uses the threat of Zika as a cover for rolling back crucial EPA regulations that protect bodies of water from pesticides. “The reality is that the majority has been pushing this legislation for years under whatever name is convenient at the time,” Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-CA) said during the floor debate Tuesday. “This bill has nothing to do with combating Zika.” Opponents of the bill noted that...

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What’s the True Cost of Fracking? This Eye-Opening Infographic May Surprise You...

May 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment There are significant pros and cons, making fracking a highly controversial issue. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA – NOVEMBER 26, 2013: Pumpjacks extract oil from an oilfield in Kern County, CA. About 15 billion barrels of oil could be extracted using hydraulic fracturing in California. Photo Credit: Christopher Halloran / Shutterstock.com Arsenic. Cadmium. Chromium. Radon. Lead. These are just a few of the toxins used in hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking, a controversial drilling process to retrieve oil and natural gas from shale deposits under the surface of the Earth. Concerns about the process have been mounting, as studies have linked it to a host of environmental and public health problems, from increased infant mortality and low birth weight babies to the release of cancer-causing radioactive gas, contamination of drinking...

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UNPLUGGING THE COLORADO RIVER

May 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Arizona-Utah border, as seen in the documentary “DamNation.” The efficiency of the dam has dwindled. Credit Ben Knight/Patagonia Could the end be near for one of the West’s biggest dams? By ABRAHM LUSTGARTEN CLIMATE PROGRESS/NYTIMES WEDGED between Arizona and Utah, less than 20 miles upriver from the Grand Canyon, a soaring concrete wall nearly the height of two football fields blocks the flow of the Colorado River. There, at Glen Canyon Dam, the river is turned back on itself, drowning more than 200 miles of plasma-red gorges and replacing the Colorado’s free-spirited rapids with an immense lake of flat, still water called Lake Powell, the nation’s second-largest reserve. When Glen Canyon Dam was built in the middle of the last century, giant dam projects promised to elevate...

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HOW NEW YORK GETS ITS’ WATER...

May 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] N.Y. / Region | New York 101 Revelations about tainted water have sparked worry across the country. The New York Times decided to look at how the nation’s largest municipal water supplier delivers what has been called the champagne of drinking water to 9.5 million people. By EMILY S. RUEB NYTIMES Illustrations by JOSH COCHRAN How New York Gets Its Water Protecting Water at Its Source The Catskill/Delaware watershed, which extends 125 miles northwest of the city, provides more than 90 percent of the city’s supply. The rest comes from the Croton watershed. Safeguarding the city’s water begins with protecting land that surrounds the streams, rivers, lakes and reservoirs. The Catskill/Delaware watershed encompasses more than a million acres. The city, state and local governments and nonprofit land conservancies own 40 percent of the...

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TOXIC LEGACY: MONSANTO AND PCB CONTAMINATION...

May 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] “But, the most important thing about PCB’s … is that we have identified a mad dog—a known bad actor in the case of PCB. There is no doubt about its toxicity and danger in the environment. It has caused millions of dollars worth of damage in the United States; the time has arrived to get rid of it.” – Statement of Congressman Gude, Legislative History of TSCA (1976). Monsanto was, in essence, the sole manufacturer of PCBs in the United States from 1930 until 1977. PCBs are an extremely toxic, persistent chemical that can cause cancer, neurological damage, immunological damage, and other severe human health problems. Monsanto contaminated the entire planet with PCBs through its manufacture, distribution and aggressive marketing of roughly 1.4 billion pounds of PCBs during this period. Due to the toxicity of PCBs and widespread contamination of air, water and soils in the U.S.,...

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PEOPLE POWER OVER CORPORATE POWER = CANCELED PIPELINE PROJECTS...

May 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Marc Yaggi |WATERKEEPER ALLIANCE A long-standing fight for the public’s right to their land and waterways came to an end April 22 when Gov. Cuomo’s New York State Department of Environmental Conservation denied the Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification for the proposed Constitution Pipeline. The pipeline was proposed to run for 124 miles and require the destruction of nearly 700,000 trees. Further, the pipeline would have carried fracked natural gas through the Hudson River estuary, crossing 289 waterbodies, multiple public drinking water sources and three watersheds. There was no expected public benefit from the pipeline. While the pipeline’s proponents alleged they would ship the fracked gas to New England, it was clear that the gas pipes leaving the pipeline’s terminus are all constrained, leaving no other option but to...

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Should You Be Worried About PFOA in Drinking Water? Here’s What We Know...

May 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Perfluorooctanoic acid, a chemical linked to cancer and thyroid disease, has been detected in drinking water across several states. By Veronica Vieira / The Conversation   VIA ALTERNET Over the past few months, several communities in upstate New York and New England have detected PFOA – perfluorooctanoic acid, or C8, a chemical linked to a range of health issues from cancer to thyroid disease – in their drinking water. PFOA is a fluorinated compound that is absorbed into our bodies through inhalation or ingestion. The chemical can then accumulate in our blood serum, kidneys and liver. The stain-resistant and water-repellant properties of PFOA make it effective in products that act as coatings. Common consumer products with PFOA include Scotchgard, Gore-Tex and Teflon. The qualities that make PFOA effective in consumer products also lead to...

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NATIVE COMMUNITIES STAND UP TO PROPOSED OIL PIPELINE: ‘THIS IS KEYSTONE 3’...

May 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Nati Harnik Pipes for the proposed Dakota Access oil pipeline, that would stretch from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to Patoka, Ill., are stacked Saturday, May 9, 2015, at a staging area in Worthing, S.D.   By some accounts, the Dakota Access oil pipeline seems like done deal. Iowa, the last state out of the four the pipeline would cut through to grant a permit, approved the pipeline in March, leaving the project with just one federal approval to gain. And the company in charge of the pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners, appears to not be waiting until that federal permit is granted: It’s already started construction on the 1,154-mile pipeline. But for the native tribes affected by the pipeline, the fight is far from...

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WORLD BANK: THE WAY CLIMATE CHANGE IS REALLY GOING TO HURT US IS THROUGH WATER...

May 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Energy and Environment By Chris Mooney The dried-up riverbank of the Ganges is seen from a bridge in Allahabad, India, on May 3. Much of India is reeling from a heat wave and severe drought conditions that have decimated crops, killed livestock and left at least 330 million Indians without enough water for their daily needs. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP) This story has been updated. As India, the world’s second-most populous country, reels from an intense drought, the World Bank has released a new report finding that perhaps the most severe impact of a changing climate could be the effect on water supplies. The most startling finding? The report suggests that by 2050, an inadequate supply of water could knock down economic growth in some parts of the world a figure as high as...

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AS CLIMATE DISRUPTION ADVANCES, U.N. WARNS: “THE FUTURE IS HAPPENING NOW”...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Dahr Jamail,TRUTHOUT.org Each month as I write these dispatches, I shake my head in disbelief at the rapidity at which anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) is occurring. It’s as though each month I think, “It can’t possibly keep happening at this incredible pace.” But it does. By late April, the Mauna Loa Observatory, which monitors atmospheric carbon dioxide, recorded an incredible daily reading: 409.3 parts per million. That is a range of atmospheric carbon dioxide content that this planet has not seen for the last 15 million years, and 2016 is poised to see these levels only continue to increase. To see more stories like this, visit “Planet or Profit?” Recently, Dr. James Hansen, a former NASA scientist and longtime whistleblower about the impending dangers of ACD, published a paper with several colleagues...

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THE SOUTHWEST’S ONLY FREE-FLOWING RIVER COULD BE SUCKED DRY BY HOME BUILDERS AND REPUBLICANS...

May 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Mother Mags   San Pedro River, holding on … For the most part Arizona hasn’t experienced severe drought conditions like we’ve seen in California and Nevada. One reason is U.S. Senator Carl Hayden, the longest serving member of Congress (1927-1969) and a principal architect of western water policy. The unassuming but powerful Arizona Democrat engineered more water for his home state than it probably deserved, given Arizona’s tiny population at the time. Hayden’s great legacy is the Central Arizona Project, a 336-mile complex of dams, canals, pumps and pipes that brings Colorado River water to Phoenix and Tucson—the most expensive water system the U.S. ever built. Another reason for Arizona’s relatively stable water situation is that some forward-thinking legislative leaders, including Republicans like Burton Barr and Stan Turley, recognized the potential water disaster facing the fast-growing state, and in 1980 the legislature passed the Groundwater Management Act, which Gov....

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Nestlé Is Trying to Break Us: A Pennsylvania Town Fights Predatory Water Extraction...

Apr 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Activism Big corporations privatizing clean water to make a profit are stealing a human right. By Alexis Bonogofsky / Moyers and Company  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Travis Wise / Flickr Donna Diehl, a 55-year-old school bus driver from Kunkletown, Pennsylvania, a small historic town located on the edge of the Poconos, wanted to do three things this year: drive the bus, paint her bathroom and learn to crochet. Instead, Diehl, along with dozens of her neighbors, is spending her time trying to stop the largest food and beverage corporation in the world from taking her community’s water, putting it in bottles and selling it for a massive profit. Nestlé Waters, the North American subsidiary of the Swiss-owned Nestlé Corporation, had been active in Kunkletown for years, conducting well testing on a privately owned...

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A MINE VS. A MILLION MONARCHS

Apr 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Opinion A Mine vs. a Million Monarchs By DAN FAGINAPRIL  NYTIMES Photo Credit Melody Newcomb THE national tourism agency calls the Mexican mountain town of Angangueo a “Pueblo Mágico.” If so, it is a dark magic. In recent years, Angangueo’s 5,000 inhabitants have been cursed by calamities natural and manufactured. Snowstorms, mudslides and flash floods have terrorized the town. Hulking piles of mine tailings line the main road, barren reminders of the silver, gold and copper mining that petered out a quarter-century ago after defining the community for 200 years. Even the monarch butterflies that are the focus of the “magic town” tourism campaign are suffering. Millions still roost on nearby mountains, a wintertime spectacle that attracts the visitors from “El Norte” who are the town’s economic lifeline. But the overwintering population of...

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DROUGHTS ARE GIVING TREES “HEART ATTACKS”...

Apr 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Around 12 million trees have perished in California in the last year. (NoIdentity via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Scientists in the US have identified the factors that make a tree more likely to perish in a drought, after conducting an exhaustive examination of 33 separate scientific studies of tree mortality involving 475 species and 760,000 individual trees. The answer they come up with is that the deciding factor is how efficiently trees draw water from the ground to their leaf tips. This is not a surprising conclusion, but scientists don’t trust the obvious: they like to check these things. And William Anderegg, assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah, and colleagues report in the Proceedings of...

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SO YOU’VE RUINED A TOWN AND POISONED ITS CHILDREN — WHAT NEXT? BILL THEM FOR YOUR LEGAL COSTS...

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Devil’s Tower By Mark Sumner  VIA DAILY KOS     Darnell Earley was appointed as emergency manager of Flint, Michigan, by Gov. Rick Snyder. As emergency manager he had expansive powers including control over the city’s public works, and while it was yet another Synder-appointed emergency manager who signed the contract to start pumping water out of the Flint River, Earley was the man in charge when the switch over actually happened and lead started leaching into the water delivered to homes. Earley is, with some justification, under criminal investigation as part of the ongoing Flint crisis. So it’s not surprising that he’s hired a lawyer. What is surprising is what he did with his legal bills. Former Flint emergency manager Darnell Earley tried to bill the cash-strapped city $750 an hour for an attorney to sit with...

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PREVENTING THE NEXT FLINT WITH TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN MAKE AT HOME...

Apr 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] How do we know the water flowing from our taps is safe and free from contaminants? For the most part, we trust that regulators and inspectors have done their jobs, and we likely don’t think about it much. We just fill our glasses, take our showers, and brush our toddlers’ teeth. But then Flint happens, or the 2014 Elk River spill in West Virginia that left 300,000 people in nine counties without water for weeks. In West Virginia, a group of students, ecologists, and public radio journalists have hatched a DIY pilot project they hope will keep another Flint or Elk River from happening. They placed six simple, low-cost sensors—developed by Public Lab and the MIT Media Lab—in the Monongahela River to show that ordinary citizens can collect and interpret water-quality data in...

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A Member of Congress Just Issued a Warning to the World Bank: ‘Stop Privatizing Water’...

Apr 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Water Rep. Gwen Moore’s actions could mean the beginning of the end of the World Bank’s harmful water-for-profit pursuits. By Jesse Bragg / AlterNet Photo Credit: Wikipedia Around the globe, people’s access to water is being threatened every day by one of the most powerful institutions on the globe—the World Bank. Under the guise of development, the World Bank and its investment arm, the International Finance Corporation, invest hundreds of millions in water privatization schemes that reduce access to water, increase costs and have a devastating impact on people. What’s worse is that the IFC often positions itself to profit from these projects, creating an irreconcilable conflict of interest. But one congresswoman just took a stand against this threat that could mean the beginning of the end of the World Bank’s harmful water-for-profit...

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OPEN SOURCE PHYTOREMEDIATION PROJECT TACKLES THE TIBER RIVER’S POLLUTION CRISIS...

Apr 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT Despite its historic significance, Rome’s Tiber River has become extremely polluted. In a bid to clean up the murky, trash-infested waters, deltastudio designed Albula, an interactive floating structure that combines elements from historic water mills with bio-based techniques like phytoremediation. Even better, the Albula is designed as an open-source and scalable project that can be replicated in a variety of contexts. Albula by deltastudio, YAP MAXXI 2016 finalist project, open source water purification, open source water urban installation, urban installation with phytoremediation, MAXXI urban design project Recognized as a YAP MAXXI 2016 finalist project, the Albula installation was proposed for the public square in front of the Zaha Hadid-designed MAXXI museum of contemporary art and architecture. The project comprises four main elements: a platform, a T-shaped metal frame, a...

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AS FRACKING CHEMICALS REACH A CREEK COMPANIES FIGHT AGAINST A FRACKING WASTE BAN...

Apr 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] CREDIT: Bill Dickinson/Flickr View of the New River bridge in Fayette County, West Virginia. A tributary of the New River has traces of endocrine disrupting chemicals associated with fracking, according to a new study. Researchers discovered the chemicals near a fracking fluid waste site. The New River is a local water source.   The smell of gas surrounding the northern streets of Lochgelly, West Virginia, was so pungent that Brad Keenan could taste it as he was driving home with his windows up that evening in 2004. He called 911 and the gas company, thinking a punctured gas line was to blame, but the smell and the evacuation it prompted came from something few knew existed in town: fracking waste. “I had no idea what was going on,” said Keenan, 54, who by...

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