THE SOUTHWEST’S ONLY FREE-FLOWING RIVER COULD BE SUCKED DRY BY HOME BUILDERS AND REPUBLICANS...

May 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Mother Mags   San Pedro River, holding on … For the most part Arizona hasn’t experienced severe drought conditions like we’ve seen in California and Nevada. One reason is U.S. Senator Carl Hayden, the longest serving member of Congress (1927-1969) and a principal architect of western water policy. The unassuming but powerful Arizona Democrat engineered more water for his home state than it probably deserved, given Arizona’s tiny population at the time. Hayden’s great legacy is the Central Arizona Project, a 336-mile complex of dams, canals, pumps and pipes that brings Colorado River water to Phoenix and Tucson—the most expensive water system the U.S. ever built. Another reason for Arizona’s relatively stable water situation is that some forward-thinking legislative leaders, including Republicans like Burton Barr and Stan Turley, recognized the potential water disaster facing the fast-growing state, and in 1980 the legislature passed the Groundwater Management Act, which Gov....

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Nestlé Is Trying to Break Us: A Pennsylvania Town Fights Predatory Water Extraction...

Apr 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Activism Big corporations privatizing clean water to make a profit are stealing a human right. By Alexis Bonogofsky / Moyers and Company  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Travis Wise / Flickr Donna Diehl, a 55-year-old school bus driver from Kunkletown, Pennsylvania, a small historic town located on the edge of the Poconos, wanted to do three things this year: drive the bus, paint her bathroom and learn to crochet. Instead, Diehl, along with dozens of her neighbors, is spending her time trying to stop the largest food and beverage corporation in the world from taking her community’s water, putting it in bottles and selling it for a massive profit. Nestlé Waters, the North American subsidiary of the Swiss-owned Nestlé Corporation, had been active in Kunkletown for years, conducting well testing on a privately owned...

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A MINE VS. A MILLION MONARCHS

Apr 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Opinion A Mine vs. a Million Monarchs By DAN FAGINAPRIL  NYTIMES Photo Credit Melody Newcomb THE national tourism agency calls the Mexican mountain town of Angangueo a “Pueblo Mágico.” If so, it is a dark magic. In recent years, Angangueo’s 5,000 inhabitants have been cursed by calamities natural and manufactured. Snowstorms, mudslides and flash floods have terrorized the town. Hulking piles of mine tailings line the main road, barren reminders of the silver, gold and copper mining that petered out a quarter-century ago after defining the community for 200 years. Even the monarch butterflies that are the focus of the “magic town” tourism campaign are suffering. Millions still roost on nearby mountains, a wintertime spectacle that attracts the visitors from “El Norte” who are the town’s economic lifeline. But the overwintering population of...

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DROUGHTS ARE GIVING TREES “HEART ATTACKS”...

Apr 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Around 12 million trees have perished in California in the last year. (NoIdentity via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Scientists in the US have identified the factors that make a tree more likely to perish in a drought, after conducting an exhaustive examination of 33 separate scientific studies of tree mortality involving 475 species and 760,000 individual trees. The answer they come up with is that the deciding factor is how efficiently trees draw water from the ground to their leaf tips. This is not a surprising conclusion, but scientists don’t trust the obvious: they like to check these things. And William Anderegg, assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah, and colleagues report in the Proceedings of...

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SO YOU’VE RUINED A TOWN AND POISONED ITS CHILDREN — WHAT NEXT? BILL THEM FOR YOUR LEGAL COSTS...

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Devil’s Tower By Mark Sumner  VIA DAILY KOS     Darnell Earley was appointed as emergency manager of Flint, Michigan, by Gov. Rick Snyder. As emergency manager he had expansive powers including control over the city’s public works, and while it was yet another Synder-appointed emergency manager who signed the contract to start pumping water out of the Flint River, Earley was the man in charge when the switch over actually happened and lead started leaching into the water delivered to homes. Earley is, with some justification, under criminal investigation as part of the ongoing Flint crisis. So it’s not surprising that he’s hired a lawyer. What is surprising is what he did with his legal bills. Former Flint emergency manager Darnell Earley tried to bill the cash-strapped city $750 an hour for an attorney to sit with...

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PREVENTING THE NEXT FLINT WITH TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN MAKE AT HOME...

Apr 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] How do we know the water flowing from our taps is safe and free from contaminants? For the most part, we trust that regulators and inspectors have done their jobs, and we likely don’t think about it much. We just fill our glasses, take our showers, and brush our toddlers’ teeth. But then Flint happens, or the 2014 Elk River spill in West Virginia that left 300,000 people in nine counties without water for weeks. In West Virginia, a group of students, ecologists, and public radio journalists have hatched a DIY pilot project they hope will keep another Flint or Elk River from happening. They placed six simple, low-cost sensors—developed by Public Lab and the MIT Media Lab—in the Monongahela River to show that ordinary citizens can collect and interpret water-quality data in...

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A Member of Congress Just Issued a Warning to the World Bank: ‘Stop Privatizing Water’...

Apr 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Water Rep. Gwen Moore’s actions could mean the beginning of the end of the World Bank’s harmful water-for-profit pursuits. By Jesse Bragg / AlterNet Photo Credit: Wikipedia Around the globe, people’s access to water is being threatened every day by one of the most powerful institutions on the globe—the World Bank. Under the guise of development, the World Bank and its investment arm, the International Finance Corporation, invest hundreds of millions in water privatization schemes that reduce access to water, increase costs and have a devastating impact on people. What’s worse is that the IFC often positions itself to profit from these projects, creating an irreconcilable conflict of interest. But one congresswoman just took a stand against this threat that could mean the beginning of the end of the World Bank’s harmful water-for-profit...

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OPEN SOURCE PHYTOREMEDIATION PROJECT TACKLES THE TIBER RIVER’S POLLUTION CRISIS...

Apr 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT Despite its historic significance, Rome’s Tiber River has become extremely polluted. In a bid to clean up the murky, trash-infested waters, deltastudio designed Albula, an interactive floating structure that combines elements from historic water mills with bio-based techniques like phytoremediation. Even better, the Albula is designed as an open-source and scalable project that can be replicated in a variety of contexts. Albula by deltastudio, YAP MAXXI 2016 finalist project, open source water purification, open source water urban installation, urban installation with phytoremediation, MAXXI urban design project Recognized as a YAP MAXXI 2016 finalist project, the Albula installation was proposed for the public square in front of the Zaha Hadid-designed MAXXI museum of contemporary art and architecture. The project comprises four main elements: a platform, a T-shaped metal frame, a...

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AS FRACKING CHEMICALS REACH A CREEK COMPANIES FIGHT AGAINST A FRACKING WASTE BAN...

Apr 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] CREDIT: Bill Dickinson/Flickr View of the New River bridge in Fayette County, West Virginia. A tributary of the New River has traces of endocrine disrupting chemicals associated with fracking, according to a new study. Researchers discovered the chemicals near a fracking fluid waste site. The New River is a local water source.   The smell of gas surrounding the northern streets of Lochgelly, West Virginia, was so pungent that Brad Keenan could taste it as he was driving home with his windows up that evening in 2004. He called 911 and the gas company, thinking a punctured gas line was to blame, but the smell and the evacuation it prompted came from something few knew existed in town: fracking waste. “I had no idea what was going on,” said Keenan, 54, who by...

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WHY WORLD LEADERS ARE TERRIFIED OF WATER SHORTAGES...

Apr 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] From Yemen to Syria to Arizona, droughts are a growing threat. —By Nathan Halverson MOTHER JONES WVillagers ride donkeys to get water in Yemen in 2012. Yemen is one of the most arid countries in the world and relies almost exclusively on groundwater and rainfall for its water supply. Mohammed Mohammed/Xinhua/ZUMA This story was originally published by Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Subscribe to the podcast and learn more at revealnews.org. Secret conversations between American diplomats show how a growing water crisis in the Middle East destabilized the region, helping spark civil wars in Syria and Yemen, and how those water shortages are spreading to the United States. Classified US cables reviewed by Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting...

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HOW A PAPER PLANT IN ARKANSAS IS ALLEGEDLY POISONING THE PEOPLE OF CROSSETT...

Apr 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Tech & Science By Emily Crane Linn NEWSWEEK The Georgia-Pacific’s aeration pond in Crossett, Arkansas. The paper and plywood plant employs a large amount of the surrounding community and many in the area blame the plant’s pollution for the severe health issues residents are facing. Nicolaus Czarnecki/ZUMA/Alamy “Let me give you a sketch of the neighborhood,” Leroy Patton said as he put his car in Park on the side of Lawson Road. He took his toothpick out of his mouth and used it to point to an empty house, an abandoned doll lying facedown in the weeds in front of the hollow structure. The Lawson couple used to live here, Patton says; the street was named for them. “They’re dead from cancer and stroke.” He pointed to another property. “Down here is Pat....

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Infographic: How Ocean Pollution Impacts Marine Life—and All of Us...

Apr 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Much of the plastic we produce ends up in the ocean, where it kills fish, sea turtles and marine mammals. By Torben Lonne / AlterNet Environmental Pollution – A discarded white plastic bags drifts over a tropical coral reef Photo Credit: Richard Whitcombe/Shutterstock The world’s oceans are a magical, diverse and abundant ecosystem that mankind needs in order to survive. The oceans cover over 72 percent of the planet’s surface, provide over 97 percent of the world’s water supply and over 70 percent of the oxygen we breathe. We have so much to thank the oceans for; however, they are threatened daily by natural and manmade pollution. Ocean pollution comes in many forms, but the largest factor affecting the oceans is plastic. Over the last decade, we have produced more plastic than...

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U.S. WATER SYSTEMS REPEATEDLY EXCEED FEDERAL STANDARD FOR LEAD...

Apr 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By RYAN J. FOLEY and MEGHAN HOYER   A.P. In this Wednesday, March 9, 2016 photo, city officials display an example of the lead pipes in… Read more GALESBURG, Ill. (AP) — This railroad town promotes its ties to Abraham Lincoln, Ronald Reagan and the poet Carl Sandburg. But Galesburg’s long history also shows in a hidden way: Aging pipes have been leaking lead into the drinking water for decades. Blood tests show cause for concern. One in 20 children under the age of 6 in Knox County had lead levels exceeding the state standard for public health intervention, a rate six times higher than the Illinois average, in 2014. Galesburg offers just one example of how the problem of lead-tainted drinking water goes far beyond Flint, Michigan, the former auto manufacturing center...

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MIT TACKLES THE FUTURE OF INTRASTRUCTURAL INNOVATION...

Apr 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View Dana Snyder  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Rebuild by Design, bird’s-eye view of the New Meadowlands project, with Manhattan on the east. Image courtesy MIT CAU + ZUS + Urbanisten, 2014 In January, MIT’s Center for Advanced Urbanism (CAU) released two books, Infrastructural Monument and Scaling Infrastructure (Princeton Architectural Press), detailing the proceedings from two infrastructure-themed conferences that took place in the Springs of 2013 and 2014 (respectively). The conferences brought together leading architects, policy makers, civil engineers, and other urban design practitioners to discuss important issues, ranging from transportation to disaster relief to policymaking. However, if global urbanism today marks the shift from Global North to Global South as the preeminent stage for urbanization, these books are inadequate representations of that pattern. In one of the books’ more interesting transcriptions, Pierre Bélanger,...

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CLIMATE CHANGE IS SUCKING THE COLORADO RIVER DRY...

Apr 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By John Upton GRIST Cross-posted from ClimateCentral Even as the number of Americans relying on the Colorado River for household water swells to about 40 million, global warming appears to be taking a chunk out of the flows that feed their reservoirs. Winter storms over the Rocky Mountains provide much of the water that courses down the heavily tapped waterway, which spills through deep gorges of the Southwest and into Mexico. ow water levels in late 2014 at Lake Powell, which is a Colorado River water reservoir built along the border of Utah and Arizona.Low water levels in late 2014 at Lake Powell, which is a Colorado River water reservoir built along the border of Utah and Arizona.Jessica Mercer But flows in recent decades have been lighter than would have been expected...

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BURNING ISSUES: WHY HONDURAS MATTERS IN THE 2016 CAMPAIGN...

Mar 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Burning Issues Video  CAMPAIGN FOR AMERICA’S FUTURE Berta Cáceres was an indigenous and environmental activist in Honduras who was the 2015 Goldman Environmental Prize winner for her success in blocking the Agua Zarca dam project, which would have decimated the communities and livelihoods of indigenous people in the country. Earlier in March, she was assassinated, one of at least three activists who have been murdered in connection with their efforts to protest the construction of this dam. Mark Weisbrot of the Center for Economic and Policy Research has been following the fate of social and economic justice activists in the country since a 2009 coup deposed the democratically elected government of President Manuel Zelaya. And as it turns out, Weisbrot explains in this “Burning Issues” video segment, one of the 2016 presidential...

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VIDEO: ‘DAYS OF REVOLT’: CHRIS HEDGES, NATIVE AMERICAN ACTIVISTS DENOUNCE URANIUM POISONING...

Mar 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TRUTHDIG teleSUR The United States has waged a long war against Native Americans. That war continues with abandoned uranium mines and poisoned water in South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana and Wyoming. In this episode of teleSUR’s “Days of Revolt,” Chris Hedges and Native American activists Charmaine White Face and Petuuche Gilbert discuss the exploitation of natural resources and how to combat the devastating violations on indigenous lives and land. “I think the public at large is still naive about this nuclear reactive poison,” explains Gilbert, vice president of the Laguna Acoma Coalition for a Safe Environment. “So education needs to be done. But then it’s also convincing the community to rise up against their politicians, against their leadership.” White Face, a coordinator for the Defenders of the Black Hills, agrees. “Educating—and where I...

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Chemical Companies Decide What’s Toxic, Not the EPA or FDA...

Mar 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] A bill on drinking water standards was being vetted—and possibly even written, at least in part—by chemical industry lobbyists. By Wendell Potter, Nick Penniman / Bloomsbury Press   VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: KANIN.studio / Shutterstock.com The following is an excerpt from the new book Nation on the Take by Wendell Potter & Nick Penniman (Bloomsbury Press, 2016): Arsenic, like formaldehyde, can cause health and developmental problems and at high levels is linked to certain cancers. Columbia University professor Joseph Graziano jokes, darkly, that arsenic makes lead look like a vitamin. That’s because, as he told the Center for Public Integrity’s David Heath, it “sweeps across the body and impact[s] everything that’s going on, every organ system.” It’s in weed killers marketed to fight your lawn’s crabgrass, and, in many places, it’s in the water we drink. A 2008...

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IF YOU CATCH AND USE RAINWATER IN COLORADO, YOU ARE A CRIMINAL...

Mar 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Nicole Gentile – Guest Contributor  CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: shutterstock   In a state where recreational marijuana was legalized two years ago and extreme weather has caused serious concerns, one mundane drought-fighting tool remains illegal: using rain barrels to catch rainwater from roofs for use in gardens. Despite the fact that the American West is facing serious water shortages — Lake Mead, for example, is at its lowest recorded levels since the 1930s — recent proposals to legalize rain barrels in Colorado have been stalled or defeated. But this could soon change. A bill to legalize rain barrels is making its way through the Colorado state legislature, which would allow homeowners to possess two 55-gallon rain barrels to be used to collect and store rainwater for use in gardens and yards. The bill...

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DRUGS IN THE DRINKING WATER? DON’T ASK AND OFFICIALS WON’T TELL...

Mar 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Martha Rosenberg, Organic Consumers Association (Photo: Water Testing via Shutterstock) The lead crisis in Flint, Mich. has drawn national attention to deadly and often underreported risks in the public water supply. Thanks to the chemical, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries, and antiquated water systems, Americans are imbibing a witch’s brew of drugs and chemicals often without realizing it. These contaminants get into the water through human drug waste in sewage, medicines flushed down toilets, agricultural runoff and the wide use of endocrine disruptors like pesticides, flame retardants and plastic-related compounds like phthalates and BPA. (BPA has ironically been used in bottled water that people drink to avoid tap water risks!) When it comes to pharmaceuticals in the water supply, both drug industry and water treatment professionals say traces are so small they...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (MARCH 1 – 15)...

Mar 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT   by J.R. Taylor Buffalo Bayou Park, Houston / Jon Shapley, The Houston Chronicle Saving Water Is So Hot Right Now in Landscape Design – Wired, 3/4/16 “The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) asks hundreds of landscape architects around the U.S. to forecast the trends in outdoor design for the coming year. The point of the survey is to look beyond industry insider buzz and figure out what designers’ clients are actually asking for. This year’s results are in, and they show people are overwhelmingly concerned with water conservation.” The Great Wall of Japan Divides a Country Still Reeling from 2011’s Earthquake – Lakes Mail, 3/5/16 “Within months, plans to build super seawalls of up to 17m in height along more than 400km of the coastline of the worst-hit Fukishima,...

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ALL EYES ON FLINT, BUT DRINKING WATER CRISIS STRETCHES NATIONWIDE...

Mar 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] 6 By Deirdre Fulton / Common Dreams   VIA TRUTHDIG     The Flint Water Plant tower in Michigan. (ehrlif / Shutterstock) While a congressional hearing Thursday focused attention on the drinking water crisis in Flint, Michigan, news reporting from around the country reveals that the problem of lead-contamination afflicts communities nationwide. A multi-part USA Today investigation published this week identified almost 2,000 additional water systems in all 50 states where testing has shown excessive levels of lead contamination over the past four years. “The water systems, which reported lead levels exceeding Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] standards, collectively supply water to 6 million people,” according to reporters Alison Young and Mark Nichols. The series installment released Thursday details hundreds of educational facilities across the nation “where children were exposed to water containing excessive amounts...

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Carbon Dioxide Levels Reach Highest Point in 15 Million Years...

Mar 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Sea levels (and temperatures) are also the highest they’ve been in years. By Dahr Jamail / Truthout   Chemical factory with smoke stack Photo Credit: Nickolay Khoroshkov Recently, a Norwegian Coast Guard icebreaker ship took an interesting trip into the Arctic. The ship found no ice to break, despite the fact that it was the dead of winter and barely 800 miles from the North Pole. Indeed, record-low levels of Arctic sea ice are becoming normal. The ice is disappearing before our very eyes.  Satellite data now shows we are witnessing a very rapid acceleration in global sea level rise. In the last six years, oceans have risen by five millimeters per year, which is a rate not seen since the ending of the last Ice Age – and it is accelerating. One of the...

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Supreme Court Refuses To Take Up Case Challenging The Cleanup Of The Chesapeake Bay...

Mar 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Alex Dominguez Debris floats in the Chesapeake Bay north of the Bay Bridge on Monday, Sept. 12, 2011 in Sandy Point State Park, Md.   The Chesapeake Bay can forge ahead with its much-needed cleanup plan, after the Supreme Court decided Monday that it wouldn’t be taking up a case challenging the rule. The court’s decision not to take up the case, brought by the American Farm Bureau Federation and other agriculture and business interests, means that a lower court’s decision last July, which found that the effort is legal, stands. The cleanup effort, called the Chesapeake Bay Clean Water Blueprint sets a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for how much nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment pollution can enter the bay. Under the TMDL, these forms of...

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WORLD’S BIGGEST FLOATING SOLAR FARM POWERS UP OUTISIDE LONDON...

Feb 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE GUARDIAN Construction of Europe’s largest floating solar panel array is underway on London’s Queen Elizabeth II reservoir. Photograph: Martin Godwin for the Guardian Divers fix anchors onto the bed of the reservoir. The panels are fixed to floats at the water’s edge, and then fed down onto the water. Photograph: Martin Godwin for the Guardian The system will cover around one-tenth of the reservoir. Photograph: Martin Godwin for the Guardian Five years in planning and due to be finished in early March, more than 23,000 solar panels will be floated on the Queen Elizabeth II reservoir near Heathrow and used to generate power for local water treatment plants Construction of Europe’s largest floating solar panel array is underway on London’s Queen Elizabeth II reservoir. Photograph: Martin Godwin for the Guardian Fiona Harvey...

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CALIFORNIA MOVES FORWARD WITH DRILLING IN PROTECTED AQUIFIERS...

Feb 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File California has both water and oil underground. Which is worth more?   A California regulator is asking the EPA to officially allow oil drilling and wastewater disposal in a protected aquifer near San Luis Obispo. The request is the first of dozens the state is expected to make, after revelations surfaced that the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources had, for years, improperly issued permits to inject wastewater into underground basins protected by the Clean Water Act. The California Water Board has signed off on its sister agency’s request, saying that the aquifer is separated from local drinking water sources by an “impermeable barrier.” But residents and environmentalists are skeptical. Californians have good reason to be skeptical that the division, known...

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SCIENTISTS CALCULATE OUR DEBT TO EARTH...

Feb 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     Wheat crops in Kansas depend on aquifer water. (James Watkins via Flickr) This Creative Commons-piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Perhaps for the first time, scientists have put a direct cash value on the metaphor that conservationists call “natural capital”. This is, in effect, the money humans don’t have to spend on services that nature supplies for free—such as crop pollination, water purification, and coastal protection by wetlands, sandbanks and reefs. And one high value transaction supplied gratis by nature is groundwater. For farmers, water in subterranean aquifers represents money in the bank, as groundwater underwrites 40% of world food production. Eli Fenichel, assistant professor at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, and colleagues looked at withdrawals from...

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PERUVIAN OIL SPILL PROMPTS WATER EMERGENCY FOR THOUSANDS...

Feb 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Thousands of residents in the northern Peruvian jungle are facing a water quality emergency following two pipeline ruptures that spilled crude oil into various waterways — including a tributary of the Amazon River — damaging a vast area known for its ecological value. Peru’s General Directorate of Environmental Health issued the water quality emergency Wednesday, more than three weeks after the first rupture was reported on January 25. The second spill, which came from a different section of the same pipeline, took place on February 3, further extending plumes of oil and affecting the livelihood of communities that rely on fishing and agriculture. “Fish have died, crocodiles have died, plants have died,” said one female resident to a Peruvian television station. “How are we...

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HERE’S WHAT WE SHOULD BE ASKING CLINTON, SANDERS, TRUMP AND CRUZ ABOUT FOOD...

Feb 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] REUTERS/Katherine Taylor By Donald Carr GRIST Cross-posted from The Republic of Awesome Let’s assume the nascent “good food” movement had its collective shit together enough to coalesce and organize into a coherent political force like the farm lobby. The Club for Growth has famously hamstrung conservative politicians with its tax pledge and it’s not out of the question to think someday the food movement could exercise the same clout. Yet no one is asking the candidates to talk about food. It’s paramount to get politicians who may have nuanced views on the record. Since a consistent and organized “Food Party” doesn’t yet exist, here’s a no-way-definitive list of what I’d like to ask the candidates about their food and farm policy plans. 1. Michael Pollan, Ricardo Salvador, Mark Bittman, and Olivier De Schutter recently called...

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BETTER WATER USE CAN CUT GLOBAL FOOD GAP...

Feb 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Paul Brown / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     An irrigation system on a pumpkin patch in a semi-arid area of New Mexico. (Daniel Schwen via Wikimedia Commons) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Although growing human numbers, climate change and other crises threaten the world‘s ability to feed itself, researchers believe that if we used water more sensibly that would go a long way towards closing the global food gap. Politicians and experts have simply underestimated what better water use can do to save millions of people from starvation, they say. For the first time, scientists have assessed the global potential for growing more food with the same amount of water. They found that production could rise by 40%, simply by optimising rain use and careful irrigation....

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