THE CHEMICAL ERIN BROKOVICH WARNED US ABOUT IS IN WATER ALL OVER AMERICA...

Sep 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Activists are warning residents of some major cities to avoid drinking water straight from the tap. Environmental activist Erin Brockovich in 2007; tainted water in California. (Photos: Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images; Eric Paul Zamora/’Fresno Bee’/Getty Images) TAKE PART DAILY Thousands of Americans drink tap water poisoned by unsafe levels of a cancer-causing heavy metal, and government authorities are doing little to stop it, according to a new report from clean water activists. The chemical hexavalent chromium, also known as chromium-6, gained notoriety as the carcinogenic water contaminant that Erin Brockovich sued a utility over in California—and the new report from advocacy organization Environmental Working Group finds that it shows up in the water systems of major cities all over the country. The data estimates that water supplies serving 218 million Americans—more than two-thirds...

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The Dairy Industry Is Polluting America’s Waterways—and Some Babies May Be Dying Because of It...

Sep 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Cheap dairy has hidden costs most consumers don’t know about—including fatal birth defects. By Ellicott Dandy / AlterNet   Cow milking facility and mechanized milking equipment Photo Credit: Ratthaphong Ekariyasap/Shutterstock Low global milk prices and a historic dairy glut in the United States have recently prompted the U.S. Department of Agriculture to purchase $20 million worth of cheese and donate it to food banks. This is excellent news for folks who typically can’t afford cheese, but cheap dairy production—paired with lax regulations—has dire consequences for too many Americans. In efforts to cut the cost of milk production, dairy farmers cut corners on pollution prevention measures necessary to protect the quality of a different beverage: water. Large dairy factory farm operations, called concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), store their manure in large lagoons and...

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THE RISE OF THE WATER PROTECTORS...

Sep 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] I write this in the heat of the struggle to block Dakota Access’ nefarious pipeline. I just returned from Standing Rock and jumped into protests for the Iowa reach of the pipeline. For over two years we at the Science & Environmental Health Network have been immersed in all forms of resisting the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) — political, legal, media, and yes, direct action. In August I joined many of my friends and colleagues at Standing Rock where I served as an on the ground lawyer. For a while I was the only lawyer at the camp and was involved in everything from issuing the call for international observers to interpreting legal decisions and their consequences. Injunctions, temporary restraining orders and hydrostatic testing permits are not the usual topics of ordinary mortals’ conversations....

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Time For Obama and Clinton To Oppose The Dakota Access Pipeline...

Sep 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The fight between Native Americans and the financial interests dead set on pushing an environmentally hazardous oil pipeline through sacred Native lands in the Midwest has intensified Thursday, ahead of what is expected to be a climactic court decision Friday on whether work on the pipeline can proceed. This confrontation over the Dakota Access Pipeline challenges President Obama, the Democratic candidate who is seeking to succeed him, Hillary Clinton, and Congress to be clear whose side they are on – Native and non-Native Americans seeking to protect vital waterways and land from the risks of oil spills (and to stop global warming by leaving oil in the ground and using renewables instead) or the fossil fuel industry and its pursuit of profits at the expense of people and the planet. So far, neither...

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Florida raises allowable limits of cancer-causing chemicals in drinking water ahead of fracking boom...

Sep 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  by: Daniel Barker (NaturalNews) On Tuesday, July 26, Florida’s Environmental Regulation Commission voted 3-2 in favor of passing controversial new water quality standards that will raise the maximum allowable levels of more than two dozen cancer-causing chemicals to be dumped into the state’s rivers and streams. The new standards, which were based on Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) recommendations, were passed despite strong opposition from clean water advocates who say that the move poses a serious health threat and paves the way for widespread fracking operations in the state. Florida regulators pimping for the fracking industry The higher maximum allowable levels apply to several of the toxic chemical byproducts produced by fracking, such as benzene, leading opponents to the conclusion that the new criteria were designed to protect the fracking industry, rather...

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California and EPA Poised to Expand Pollution of Potential Drinking Water Reserves...

Sep 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment A little-known program under federal environment law is being used to permit oil and gas companies to inject waste into the state’s aquifers, even as the thirst for groundwater grows. By Abraham Lustgarten / ProPublica   VIA ALTERNET Oil field in California’s Central Valley. Photo Credit: IRC/Shutterstock As the western United States struggles with chronic water shortages and a changing climate, scientists are warning that if vast underground stores of fresh water that California and other states rely on are not carefully conserved, they too may soon run dry. Heeding this warning, California passed new laws in late 2014 that for the first time require the state to account for its groundwater resources and measure how much water is being used. Yet California’s natural resources agency, with the oversight and consent of the...

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Contamination Threatens One of the World’s Biggest Freshwater Supplies...

Aug 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Scientists find high salt and arsenic concentrations in an aquifer that 750 million people rely on for drinking water and irrigation. This dry-season rice crop in northwest Bangladesh’s Barind region was irrigated using water pumped from wells that sink almost 250 feet deep into the Bengal Aquifer System, which is in South Asia’s Indo-Gangetic Basin. (Photo: WG Burgess) Emily J. Gertz is an associate editor for environment and wildlife at TakePart.   Three-quarters of a billion people across four South Asian nations rely on one vast water basin for much of their irrigation and drinking water. Called the Indo-Gangetic Basin, it stretches east to west over 618 million acres, sitting like a cap over the Indian subcontinent, and contains about 7,200 cubic miles of groundwater, roughly 20 times the annual...

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Pipeline protests: The fight goes on against project that could jeopardize Native lands in the Midwest...

Aug 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The pipeline will cross hundreds of rivers, creeks and tributaries, potentially compromising water supplies VIDEO Alli Joseph   SALON.COM Members of the Oglala Lakota Nation in South Dakota participate in a rally to protect water and land from the Dakota Access Pipeline, August 24, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Credit: Getty/Alex Wong) Kayla Lookinghorse-Smith set out from New York to Washington, D.C. late Tuesday night, driving six hours to attend her first protest on the East Coast against the looming Dakota Access Pipeline, a $3.78 billion, 1,100-mile oil project being built by a group of firms led by Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners. Her two young sons, 19 months and 5 years old, slept in the backseat. “I didn’t know what to expect,” she said, as she drove into the early morning hours. “I just knew that I...

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Nestlé Just Gained Control Over This Town’s Water for the Next 45 Years...

Aug 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] News Nathan Wellman Tea Party Republican Governor Paul LePage of Maine helped Nestlé secure a contract that gives Poland Springs, a Nestlé subsidiary, permission to take the small town of Fryeburg’s groundwater for the next 25 years for their own profit. The deal could stretch to 45 years due to built-in extensions. Today that deal was upheld by Maine’s Supreme Judicial Court, essentially cutting off activists’ last attempts to scuttle the deal. There has never been a contract that ties up local water resources for such a long period of time in American history. Water activists worry that this could set a precedent for future corporate attempts to take water from rural towns for extended periods of time. Nickie Sekera, the co-founder of Community Water Justice, talked to US Uncut today about the water deal. “Contracts of this length...

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GREAT LAKES WATER TO BE SOLD TO CHINA AS HALF OF U.S. FACES EXTREME WATER CRISIS...

Aug 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Great Lakes Water To Be Sold To China As Half Of U.S. Faces Extreme Water Crisis Uncategorised, On The Water, Extra   NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC If you found your way to this article recently, you may have discovered it on Snopes or another mythbuster page.  We added a feature for a period of time where users could add articles to our site.  The glitch that went un-noticed was that some articles went live without review…. automatically.  For this reason, some highly opinionated personal viewpoints with a mix of facts and phobia were published for fear’s sake on our site.  I have removed the content that was here, and replaced it with this great review on the topic by National Geographics’ Lisa Borre.  Check out her link at the bottom for comments and questions on the...

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Here’s Why the Navajo Nation Is Suing the EPA Over Colorado’s Mining Catastrophe...

Aug 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Madeleine Thomas PACIFIC STANDARD The San Juan River is one of the most sacred and agriculturally important areas to the Navajo Nation. It’s also the site of a three-million-gallon toxic mine spill.   Residue from the release of mining chemicals sits on rocks in the Animas River in Durango, Colorado. (Photo: Theo Stroomer/Getty Images) This time last year, images of Colorado’s Animas River were going viral, leaving many mystified or downright disturbed by the waterway’s Willy Wonka-esque shade of golden orange. The culprit of the bizarre phenomenon: a slurry of mining chemicals which had burst from a sealed entryway to a defunct gold mine, the Gold King Mine, located upstream. The images were met with outrage: In the last year, there have been Congressional hearings and an ongoing criminal investigation into causes of...

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Solar-powered Pipe desalinizes 1.5 billion gallons of drinking water for California...

Aug 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Tafline Laylin   INHABITAT.COM View Slideshow The infrastructure California needs to generate energy for electricity and clean water need not blight the landscape. The Pipe is one example of how producing energy can be knitted into every day life in a healthy, aesthetically-pleasing way. One of the finalists of the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative design competition for Santa Monica Pier, the design deploys electromagnetic desalination to provide clean drinking water for the city and filters the resulting brine through on-board thermal baths before it is reintroduced to the Pacific Ocean. “LAGI 2016 comes to Southern California at an important time,” write Rob Ferry and Elizabeth Monoian, co-founders of the Land Art Generator Initiative. “The sustainable infrastructure that is required to meet California’s development goals and growing population will have a profound influence...

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Colorado could vote to limit fracking on November ballot...

Aug 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] REUTERS/Cooper Neill Fracktions By Katie Herzog   GRIST Colorado is one step closer to ditching fracking.Anti-fracking activists have collected 100,000 signatures, more than the 98,500 needed, to secure two measures on the November ballot. One measure would bring oil and gas drilling operations under local oversight while the other would add a no-fracking buffer zone 2,500 feet around any occupied buildings. Together these would, in essence, prevent drilling on 95 percent of the state’s most oil-rich land, according to the New York Times. The state has 30 days to review the signatures and submit any challenges. The industry, however, is already fighting back. Pro-fracking groups have raised $13 million to oppose the initiatives, and Yes for Health and Safety Over Fracking, the group that collected the signatures, reported that volunteer and contractor canvassers were “yelled at, and physically threatened” by people suspiciously spouting oil and gas industry’s...

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Lawsuit Seeks To Keep Oil And Gas Drilling Out Of Protected California Aquifer...

Aug 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong A shut-down injection well sit next to an almond orchard in Bakersfield, Calif.   An environmental group is trying to stop a plan to expand drilling for oil and gas in protected California aquifers. The Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit Wednesday against California regulators, alleging they failed to properly consider the risks of injecting wastewater into an aquifer near San Luis Obispo, in Southern California. “It’s shocking that Gov. Jerry Brown’s oil regulators are supporting the oil industry’s efforts to get federal permission to dump waste into California’s protected aquifers,” attorney Maya Golden-Krasner said in a statement emailed to ThinkProgress. The underground aquifer — and dozens like it — are protected under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act, and the EPA...

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THIS TECH COULD MAKE WATER SHORTAGES A THING OF THE PAST...

Aug 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Infographics Videos Getty In Brief It’s no secret that there is a rather serious issue on our planet: Water. Droughts are plaguing a number of societies around the world. However, solutions appear to be on the horizon. As the droughts in California continue to intensify and summer temperatures soar around the globe (well, at least part of it), water conservation efforts are at the forefront of our minds. As everyone knows, water is the most important resource in the world. We use water for just about everything, from agriculture to industrial purposes, and of course, for the most obvious purpose: Hydration. Even though water is an essential building block for life, about 700 million people currently lack access to clean, safe water. And ironically some of these people live near immense bodies of...

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TWO TOWNS BATTLE COLORADO FOR FREEDOM TO BAN FRACKING...

Aug 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Kate Stringer, YES! Magazine Cattle graze near the Rocky Mountains in Longmont, Colorado. The town is one of two in the Centennial State that are currently working to stop fracking on their lands. (Photo: Let Ideas Compete) Two of Colorado’s leading critics of natural gas drilling say they didn’t know much about fracking until it arrived in their towns. “If you had asked me about community rights or fracking, you would have drawn a blank stare,” said Clifford Willmeng, board member of the Colorado Community Rights Network and a resident of Lafayette, a town just outside of Boulder. Tricia Olson agrees. Founder and executive director of the grassroots group Coloradans Resisting Extreme Energy Development, Olson began looking into fracking when she learned that it was coming to her neighborhood. She didn’t...

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THIS CHEAP MATERIAL CAN PURIFY DIRTY WATER AND MAKE IT SAFE TO DRINK...

Aug 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Videos Hard Science Washington University  FUTURISM In Brief US scientists discover a process to use graphene sheets to clean water. Biofoam sheets based on graphene can be laid on top of dirty or salty bodies of water to purify them and make the water safe to drink, scientists in the US have discovered. The process – the latest awesome example of what wonder material graphene can do – has huge potential as a cheap, electricity-free water purification method for developing nations. These dual-layer biofoam sheets work by drawing up water from underneath and then causing it to evaporate in the uppermost layer, releasing fresh water as condensation on the top and leaving particles and salts stuck in the foam. “The process is extremely simple… the entire thing is produced in one shot,” said one...

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6 Human Activities That Pose The Biggest Threat To The World’s Drinking Water...

Jul 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling THINK PROGRES CREDIT: Shutterstock   Clean, drinkable water is more than a precious resource — it’s crucial to human life. Unfortunately, population growth and pollution are threatening to seriously undermine the availability of clean drinking water in many of the world’s major cities. According to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, water treatment costs have risen by 50 percent in a third of large cities around the world. That means that getting clean, pure drinking water to people has become an increasingly difficult task, requiring cities not only to pay for expensive treatments, but pay for the construction of treatment plants to dole out said expensive treatments. All told, the study estimated that the total cost of degradation to our drinking water —...

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David Hertz’s Los Angeles Oasis...

Jul 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The architect and environmentalist is known for repurposing materials. Now a new device is helping him turn air into water. By Sheila Marikar   NEW YORKER MAGAZINE The L.A. architect and environmentalist David Hertz has a knack for repurposing stuff: planks of wood into skateboards, the wings of a Boeing 747 into the roof of a house, crushed LPs (smashed by teens in a gang intervention program) into flooring for a record label’s headquarters. But when a former client told him, last year, that he knew a guy who had invented a way to turn air into water, Hertz was incredulous. “I was, like, sure, let’s try it,” Hertz said. “It sounds like alchemy. And it sounds too good to be true, but let’s try it.” Hertz connected with Richard Groden, a general contractor...

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A THIRD OF CALIFORNIA’S DEEP GROUNDWATER AQUIFIERS ARE BEING USED FOR OIL AND GAS...

Jul 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/John Locher Water is pumped from a well into an irrigation ditch near Fresno, Calif.   California has a lot more usable groundwater than previously thought — but that water might already be in danger from oil and gas extraction in the state. A study released this week by Stanford scientists shows that there is nearly three times more groundwater in California’s Central Valley than earlier surveys had indicated. “It’s not often that you find a ‘water windfall,’ but we just did,” study co-author Robert Jackson, the Michelle and Kevin Douglas Provostial Professor at Stanford, said in the study’s release. “There’s far more fresh water and usable water than we expected.” Jackson and his research partner looked at deep groundwater aquifers, between 1,000 and 3,000...

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‘Water Windfall’ Found in Drought-Stricken California...

Jun 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment California’s Central Valley has three times more freshwater in underground aquifers than previously thought. By Bobby Magill / Climate Central  VIA ALTERNET California’s Central Valley has three times more freshwater in underground aquifers than previously thought, drinking water that could help the state weather future drought and fortify itself against a changing climate, according to a new Stanford University study. But tapping that water, locked thousands of feet beneath the ground, will be expensive and comes with an enormous risk — it could cause the valley floor to sink, according to the study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Sinking land in the Central Valley is threatening roads, homes and other infrastructure, and reduces the amount of water some aquifers can hold. California’s parched Central Valley in 2014. Credit: Stuart Rankin/NASA/flickr...

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NOW RESIDENTS OF THE U.S.’S SECOND LARGEST PIG PRODUCING STATE CAN SEE WHERE THE WASTE FLOWS...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Emery Dalesio Manure is sprayed on a North Carolina field.   Livestock farming — especially hog and poultry farming — is big business in North Carolina. The country’s second-largest pig producer and third-largest chicken producer, North Carolina has thousands of farming operations clustered throughout the state. And while those farms produce billions of dollars in economic revenue, they also produce something far more sinister: millions of tons of animal waste that can make its way into the air or water, polluting nearby communities and watersheds. In an effort to help spotlight the issue of animal farming and waste disposal in North Carolina, Waterkeeper Alliance and the Environmental Working Group have teamed up to release a first-of-its-kind mapping project, detailing exactly where North Carolina’s hog and poultry...

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FRACKING PRODUCES TONS OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE. WHAT SHOULD WE DO WITH IT?...

Jun 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Byproducts of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, create radioactive waste like the truckload shown here in West Virginia. BIll Hughes down in the dumps By Jie Jenny Zou   GRIST Cross-posted from Center for Public Integrity The Marcellus Shale has transformed the Appalachian Basin into an energy juggernaut. Even amid a recent drilling slowdown, regional daily production averages enough natural gas to power more than 200,000 U.S. homes for a year. But the rise of hydraulic fracturing over the past decade has created another boom: tons of radioactive materials experts call an “orphan” waste stream. No federal agency fully regulates oil and gas drilling byproducts — which include brine, sludge, rock, and soiled equipment — leaving tracking and handling to states that may be reluctant to alienate energy interests. “Nobody can say how much of...

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DRY TAPS AND LAGOONS OF SEWAGE: WHAT AMERICA’S WATER CRISIS LOOKS LIKE...

Jun 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] A new report finds that safe water and sanitation are increasingly unaffordable for millions of Americans. By Zoë CarpenterTwitter On January 28, 2016, Porshe Loyd uses bottled water to wash her three-week-old son, LeAndrew, in a baby bather in the kitchen sink at their home in Flint, Michigan. (Todd McInturf / The Detroit News via AP) In Lowndes County, Alabama, thousands of people live with raw sewage in their yards or near lagoons of human waste. Only 20 percent of the county’s residents have access to municipal sewers, leaving them responsible for maintaining their own septic systems. The soil in the former cotton-producing region is made of clay, which doesn’t drain well, and above-ground septic systems can cost up to $30,000—an impossible sum for many residents, 27 percent of whom live below the poverty...

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FREE TRADE WILL KILL PROGRESS ON CLIMATE CHANGE, 450 GROUPS WARN CONGRESS...

Jun 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Nika Knight, Common Dreams   ECO-WATCH  \Warning against dangers to “workers, communities and our environment,” more than 450 environmental advocacy groups called on Congress to reject the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Specifically warning against the Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) provisions, which allow multinational corporations sue nations in private, clandestine tribunals for passing laws they don’t like, the groups sent a letter Monday that stated: “We strongly urge you to stand up for healthy communities, clean air and water, Indigenous peoples, property rights and a stable climate by committing to vote no on the TPP and asking the U.S. Trade Representative to remove from TTIP any provision that empowers corporations to challenge government policies in extrajudicial tribunals.” “By empowering many more firms to launch ISDS cases against the U.S.,” environmental...

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AFRICAN WOMEN ARE BREAKING THEIR BACKS TO GET WATER FOR THEIR FAMILIES...

Jun 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Energy and Environment By Darryl Fears A woman gathers water from a dam for use at her home in Qunu, South Africa. (Schalk van Zuydam/AP) Four years after the United Nations announced that it cut the number of people without access to cleaner water by half, getting to that water is still a major hardship for much of sub-Saharan Africa, a new analysis shows. More than two-thirds of the region’s population reported that they leave home to collect water and haul it as far as two football fields, and that backbreaking work falls mostly on women and children in 24 countries carrying buckets that weigh as much as 40 pounds each. The result, says the analysis released Wednesday and published in the journal PLOS One, is “fatigue, musculoskeletal damage and early degenerative bone...

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Hillary Clinton Tried to Push Fracking on Other Nations When She Was Secretary of State, New Emails Reveal...

Jun 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment The State Department hoped Poland could be a “laboratory for testing whether U.S. success in developing shale gas can be repeated in a different country.” By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Secretary of State Hillary Clinton addresses the audience during the George C. Marshall Foundation Award presentation at the State Department in Washington, D.C., Oct. 16, 2009. DoD photo by Cherie Cullen Photo Credit: Cherie Cullen/U.S. Department of Defense Emails obtained by The Intercept from the State Department reveal new details of Hillary Clinton’s behind-the-scenes efforts to export fracking—a method of extracting oil and natural gas from underground shale deposits—to foreign countries during her tenure as Secretary of State. The emails, acquired through a Freedom of Information Act request, could be particularly damning in light of Clinton’s recent attempts to ally herself with the...

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MAKING SENSE OF DWP REFORM IN CALIFORNIA...

Jun 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] A SUMMARY REPORT: MAKING SENSE OF DWP REFORM A CONFERENCE AND PANEL DISCUSSION HELD TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 2016 RONALD F. DEATON CIVIC AUDITORIUM n LAPD HEADQUARTERS PRESENTED BY THE PAT BROWN INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS CAL STATE LA “These forums can be our city’s second Mulholland moment when our city reimagines the kind of DWP our city needs. This moment needs to be not only about the things we do, but how we do them.” —Mayor Eric Garcetti PAT BROWN INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS 1 The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (DWP) has often been the subject of reform efforts. DWP reform is once again on the city’s agenda. Customer service, utility rates, budget transfers, hiring and other labor issues have all generated discussion and debate. There is a great deal...

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33 OTHER U.S. CITIES HAVE CHEATED WATER TESTS THAT DETECT LEAD...

Jun 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Guardian tried to obtain “water testing documents” from 81 cities and 43 offered information. The tricks used by officials include practices such as removing aerators, pre-flushing pipes, and running water slowly. All these practices potentially reduce the amount of lead that shows up in water samples. Sometimes officials didn’t test water in what they determined were “high-risk homes.” Related: BREAKING: What Flint officials knew about the poisoned water, and when In Michigan and New Hampshire, departments allowed employees to re-sample and toss out “results with high lead levels.” In Chicago and Philadelphia, officials requested that employees “test water safety in their own homes.” Some cities, citing security risk concerns, said they didn’t know where lead pipes were or didn’t conduct testing in the mandatory amount of homes with lead pipes. As a...

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