MAP SHOWS HOW MICHIGAN’S LEAD PROBLEM EXTENDS FAR BEYOND THE FLINT WATER CRISIS...

Jan 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] iStockphoto By Aura Bogado THINK PROGRESS Flint is Michigan’s poster child for environmental disaster — a crisis that could have been avoided. As my colleague Raven Rakia has pointed out, lead exposure, which causes an array of health problems and is especially bad for children, is completely preventable. But that doesn’t mean that those responsible for public health do their jobs. In Flint, a city that’s nearly 60 percent black and where more than 42 percent of residents live below the poverty line, officials switched to a cheaper water source. That source was cheaper for a reason: The water was polluted and corrosive. So it leached lead from the old pipes when they piped it in. That burdened local residents with water that’s been making them sick for more than a year. But high levels...

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AS FLINT STRUGGLES WITH CONTAMINATED WATER, CONGRESS TRIES TO GUT CLEAN WATER RULE...

Jan 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) The latest attempt to do away with a federal water rule that protects millions of miles of streams failed Thursday, as senators couldn’t garner enough votes to override a presidential veto and block the contested Waters of the United States rule. The attempt to veto the rule, which protects bodies of water that provide drinking water for one-third of Americans, comes in the midst of a water contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan. The vote was deeply divided among partisan lines, with 52 senators voting to upheld the veto, eight abstaining and the remaining 40 voting against it. While the vote was close, overriding a veto requires a super-majority. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) filed for the vote, which was considered a long-shot...

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THE SEVEN CHARTS YOU NEED TO FATHOM CALIFORNIA’S WATER PROSPECTS...

Jan 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Nathanael Johnson   GRIST It’s finally raining in California — just when we’d begun to think that it would never rain again. But the state is deep in water debt. Traditionally, California has depended on snowmelt for about a third of its water. The recent storms have gotten California’s snowpack up to slightly above average for this time of year, but it’s going to take a lot more than that to refill reservoirs. First the good news: Snow! Compare the current snowpack (above) to this time last year. Why are we seeing more snow? Well, it got colder and wetter. Last year, average minimum temperature in the Sierra Nevada mountains was 32.1 degrees, which meant it just wasn’t cold enough to snow in most places. “Temperatures are getting warmer every year,” said Doug Carlson, an information officer...

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Shocker: Govt. Scientists Admit They Deceived the Public About Fracking’s Impact on Drinking Water...

Jan 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] There will be heavy pressure to revise the EPA’s conclusion — and the oil and gas industry will have major egg on its face. By Justin Gardner / The Free Thought Project  VIA ALTERNET Five years ago, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was commissioned by Congress to undertake a study on the impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on drinking water. This newer method of oil and gas extraction involves the pumping of highly pressurized water, sand and chemicals into underground rock formations. Fracking has driven the boom in U.S. oil production and contributed to the steep drop in gasoline prices, but the environmental impacts of this relatively new technique are not well understood. The EPA’s draft study—released in June to solicit input from advisers and the public—found  that fracking has already contaminated drinking...

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GREENBUILD GOES MAINSTREAM

Dec 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] It may be more challenging than anyone has supposed for Greenbuild to penetrate popular consciousness. Susan S. Szenasy  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski interviews director James Cameron at this year’s Greenbuild conference. Courtesy Greenbuild International Conference & Expo In November, I boarded Amtrak to head to Washington, D.C. Our capital city, boasting more monuments than any other in the country, apparently inspires Greenbuild, the annual conference of the United States Greenbuilding Council (USGBC), to make some monumental announcements. Much has been accomplished in the organization’s 23 years of environmental advocacy. But it may be best known for its LEED-rating programs, which consider construction and planning at all scales, asking architects, builders, and developers to pay attention to, among other things, water, energy, and health—all that our home planet, and the living creatures that inhabit...

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LAKES ARE HEATING UP, PUTTING FOOD AND WATER SUPPLY AT RISK...

Dec 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe Ethnic Intha fishermen dressed in customary attire with traditional fish-traps pretend to catch fish for tourists to take pictures as a real fisherman catches fish in the background in Inle lake, northeastern Shan state, Myanmar.   While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Researchers looked at 235 lakes around the world over the past 25 years and found that, on average, they are gaining a third of a degree (Celsius) every decade. The study, which used onsite measurements and satellite temperature data, found that warming was most pronounced in northern and tropical regions. “These results...

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CHINA’S “SPONGE CITIES” USE SMART INFRASTRUCTURE TO PREVENT MASSIVE WATER ISSUES...

Dec 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Kate Yoder   GRIST Of China’s many green fascinations (Exhibit A: Sproutcore), here’s one that seems like it’s actually going to change the country for the better: “sponge cities.” Nope, a sponge city isn’t a metropolis built from retired dishwashing sponges. Nor is it Bikini Bottom, that underwater hometown of one SpongeBob SquarePants. It’s a city built around the urban design concept of managing water in a ecologically sensible way. China’s natural ponds, rivers, and wetlands have been overwritten by a system of dams, levees, and tunnels that often can’t withstand the forces of nature. As a result of rapid urbanization and a whole lot of impermeable concrete (China used more cement from 2011 through 2013 than the U.S. did during the entire 20th century), the country is seeing more floods — and more serious ones — more...

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WE TESTED FANCY WATER VS. TAP WATER. HERE’S WHAT WE FOUND....

Dec 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Katie Herzog GRIST I’ve gotten some weird mail at the office this year. First, there was a massive bouquet from a Tinder match I had neither met nor told where I work. Then there was the cactus with the ominous note reading YOU KNOW WHAT YOU DID in all caps. Then there was the two-foot-tall cardboard penis that some unknown friend (enemy?) decided to anonymously ship to the office. The plants were nice, but after the cardboard dick, you can imagination my trepidation when I recently received another anonymous package in the mail at work. Was it an Apple Watch or a severed human hand? Could have been either.Thankfully, it was neither. The package contained samples of JUST Water, a boxed-water product that claims to be more sustainable than bottled water. “JUST water is responsibly sourced, produced and packaged for improved environmental...

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FRACKING EXPANDS IN LATIN AMERICA, THREATENING TO CONTAMINATE WORLD’S THIRD-LARGEST AQUIFIER...

Dec 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Fracking Spanning an area that includes southern Brazil and part of Paraguay, Argentina and Uruguay, the Guaraní Aquifer holds 20 percent of South America’s water. By Santiago Navarro, Renata Bessi / Truthout   VIA ALTERNET December 11, 2015 Photo Credit: Calin Tatu/Shutterstock.com Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking – a method whereby hydrocarbons trapped within rocks are extracted – is expanding rapidly in Latin America. Fracking emits benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene, which are considered by the World Health Organization to be carcinogenic and responsible for blood disorders and other immunological effects. Despite these adverse health effects, however, reserves have already been mapped out in Bolivia, Colombia, Venezuela, Paraguay, Uruguay, Chile, Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. In Mexico, recently passed energy reform legislation promotes fracking as a means of extracting shale gas – and with the reform,...

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DOES THE U.S. GOVERNMENT ACTUALLY REGULATE PIPELINES?...

Dec 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Dahr Jamail, Truthout | Report The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has a reputation of effectively rubber-stamping every pipeline that comes its way. (Photo: Pipelines via Shutterstock; Edited: LW / TO) While global leaders meet in Paris at the COP21 climate talks in an effort to rein in global greenhouse gas emissions, the fossil fuel industry continues with business as usual. In far west Texas, that means a proposal for a controversial high-pressure natural gas transmission pipeline in a state that already boasts 431,997 miles of pipelines – enough to stretch to the moon and most of the way back to earth. The additional 143-mile-long, 42-inch-diameter Trans-Pecos pipeline will be built right through the heart of Texas’ starkly beautiful and remote Chihuahuan Desert, as Truthout previously reported. The aim of the pipeline is purportedly...

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Owner Of Mine That Spilled Toxic Waste Into A Colorado River Compares The EPA To Rapists...

Dec 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Nicole Gentile – Guest Contributor & Jessica Goad -CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Brennan Linsley In this Aug. 14, 2015 photo, water flows through a series of sediment retention ponds built to reduce heavy metal and chemical contaminants from the Gold King Mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about 1/4 mile downstream from the mine, outside Silverton, Colo.   Photos of the bright-orange colored Animas River in southwestern Colorado made international headlines in August after three million gallons of toxic mining sludge poured into it. Contractors working for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally released the waste while attempting to clean up the site, abandoned by its original owners decades ago. But now, three months later, the owner of the Gold King Mine told the Durango Herald that it’s he who feels “victimized”...

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WE CAN MIMIC NATURE TO BETTER MANAGE WATER...

Nov 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Liz Camuti If it weren’t for us, bison and beavers might still roam Chicago, Illinois, the location of the 2015 ASLA Annual Meeting and Expo. The absence of these keystone species, which once provided important roles in the continental water cycle, represents a marked shift in national ecosystem functioning. However, landscape architects and engineers from Andropogon Associates and Biohabitats are thinking about how to bring back the ecosystem services these species once provided in order to more sustainably manage water. “We’re not bringing bison back to the edge of Chicago where they would have been, but looking at their functionality, the lessons that can be learned from them. Their ecosystems were widespread and featured a highly-decentralized water management system,” said Keith Bowers, FASLA, president of Biohabitats. “We need to ask ourselves how we can turn...

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HUMAN WASTE COULD LIGHT UP MORE THAN 138 MILLION HOMES: STUDY...

Nov 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Eleanor Goldberg Impact editor, The Huffington Post :  Tuomas Lehtinen via Getty Images We can finally stop flushing a valuable energy source down the toilet, new research has found. If all the world’s human waste were collected and converted into usable energy, it could be used to light up more than 138 million households, according to the United Nations University Institute for Water, Environment and Health. Admittedly, it may take time for underserved communities to get over the “ick” factor, researchers noted, but a U.N. group has a plan in place to start implementing the process in Uganda, where more than half of residents share open pit latrines or practice open defecation, which in turn contaminates water sources and can lead to waterborne diseases. “One thing is clear,” the researchers noted. “Rather...

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Meet the Federal Agency Rubber Stamping the Rampant Expansion of Fracking...

Nov 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The agency that once operated quietly under public radar has become the target of activist outrage for spearheading fossil fuel corporate domination. By Dory Hippauf, Ellen Cantarow / Truthout   VIA ALTERNET October 21, 2015 Photo Credit: Calin Tatu/Shutterstock.com The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), a national agency with wide jurisdiction over gas industry projects, used to be one of those unseen government organizations that go quietly about their business, creating no headlines and flying under the public radar. But mounting citizen alarm about the high-volume hydraulic fracturing industry has changed all that, and FERC’s opponents have publicly accused the agency of being a spearhead for fossil fuel corporate domination of the United States and its resources. Early opposition to shale drilling was restricted to protests against what is commonly called fracking – blasting...

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CARBON IS THE ROOT OF A NEW, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEM...

Oct 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Jared Green Turning the conventional wisdom on its head, Janine Benyus, author of Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature and founder of the Biomimicry Institute, argued that carbon dioxide pollution in the atmosphere can become the source of a new, regenerative agricultural system at SXSW Eco in Austin, Texas. Instead of treating carbon dioxide emissions as a waste product that needs to be reduced, it can instead fuel our food production. We can mimic the functions of prairie ecosystems to store all of that excess CO2 and create a more sustainable food production system. “Nature has no landfills; everything has a second life,” Benyus argued. Carbon dioxide is already the basis of a complex system of “upcycling” in nature. A tree absorbs carbon dioxide, sequestering it as it grows. When it dies, it’s decomposing trunk is...

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EPA RULE AIMS TO CURB TOXIC COAL PLANT POLLUTION IN WATERWAYS...

Oct 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Matthew Brown This June 17, 2011 photo shows PPL Montana’s J.E. Corette coal-fired power plant along the Yellowstone River in Billings, Mont. The Environmental Protection Agency announced new rules Wednesday aimed at curbing the amount of pollution that power plants dump into streams. The rule, known as the Steam Electric Power Generating Effluent Guidelines, targets steam electric power plants — plants that use steam to drive the electric generator — that dump large amounts of toxic pollutants into streams every year. The rule, according to the EPA, marks the first time the federal government has set limits on the amount of toxic metals that power plants can discharge into streams. The EPA estimates that the rule will keep 1.4 billion pounds of toxic metals and other...

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MARTIAN WATER GUARANTEES NOTHING: THE SEARCH FOR ALIEN LIFE WILL BE VERY, VERY TRICKY...

Oct 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Microbial contamination risks could prevent humans and robots from exploring the planet’s most fertile regions Lee Billings, Scientific American   This article was originally published by Scientific American. Scientific American NASA scientists announced today the best evidence yet that Mars, once thought dry, sterile and dead, may yet have life in it: Liquid water still flows on at least some parts of the Red Planet, seeping from slopes to accumulate in what might be life-nurturing pools at the bases of equatorial hills and craters. These remarkable sites on Mars may be the best locations in the solar system to search for extant extraterrestrial life—but doing so will be far from easy. Examining potentially habitable regions of Mars for signs of life is arguably the primary scientific justification for sending humans there—but according to...

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A CALIFORNIA GARDEN IN THE FOURTH YEAR OF THE DROUGHT...

Sep 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Martha Ture DAILY KOS The hummingbird zooms in over the fence about 7 every morning, while I’m watering.  It’s a male Anna’s hummingbird, identifiable by his iridescent rose gorget. He hovers a foot above the hose spray, singing his high-pitched rusty gate greeting, hangs for a few seconds in front of me, and then rises and soars away to a branch in the madrone tree.  I raise the hose and lay some water drops on the leaves for him and return to the arithmetic watering of each garden bed.  In order to approach maximum water efficiency and minimize water waste, I’ve worked out a method for watering in this fourth year of drought in California. I put the moisture meter’s sensor down into the root zone of each row and planter box....

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TODAY’S U.S.-CHINA ANNOUNCEMENT IS THE MOST SIGNIFICANT MILESTONE TO DATE FOR BATTLING GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE...

Sep 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]  ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE Today’s joint announcement by President Obama and President Xi represents the second time in two years the leaders have met to make significant climate commitments. Last year’s meeting focused on setting aggressive goals that reflect each country’s unique situation. This year’s meeting moved decisively to implementation commitments intended to deliver these results. The message is clear: the time for talking about climate is over. The two largest economies and emitters must lead in action. The commitments by the countries are sweeping and perhaps the greatest cause for hope yet in international attempts to address global warming—especially looking forward to COP21 in Paris this upcoming December. Among the outcomes are the creation of the world’s largest carbon market, market reforms within China that will help support accelerated renewables development, redoubled support...

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REVERSING THE TIDE: CITIES AND COUNTRIES ARE REBELLING AGAINST WATER PRIVATIZATION, AND WINNING!...

Sep 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tom Lawson, Occupy.com | News Analysis Demonstrators march through the streets to protest a water tax in Dublin, Ireland, November 1, 2014. (Photo: William Murphy)   Private companies have been working to make a profit from water since the 1600s, when the first water companies were established in England and Wales. The first wave of water privatization occurred in the 1800s, and by the mid- to late-19th century, privately owned water utilities were common in Europe, the United States and Latin America, and began to appear in Africa and Asia. But the privatization flurry faded, and throughout much of the 20th century water was largely a publicly controlled resource. In the US, for example, just 30% of piped water systems were privately owned in 1924, dropping from 60% in 1850. It...

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LAND DEGRADATION, DESERTIFICATION MIGHT CREATE 50 MILLION CLIMATE REFUGEES WITHIN A DECADE...

Sep 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Avaneesh Pandey TRUTHDI Desertification — climate change-triggered degradation of land ecosystems — will, in a decade, create 50 million refugees, the Economics of Land Degradation (ELD), a global initiative led by 30 different research groups, warned. Pictured: Farmers prepare to plant grass to stabilise sand dunes at the edge of the Mu Us Desert in Lingwu, northwest China’s Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region October 19, 2007. Reuters/Stringer Desertification — climate change-triggered degradation of land ecosystems — might, in a decade, create 50 million refugees, the Economics of Land Degradation (ELD), a global initiative led by 30 different research groups, warned in a new study published Tuesday. The study, backed by the United Nations, also found that $6.3 trillion to $10.6 trillion worth of resources — equivalent to up to 17 percent of the...

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ULTRA CHEAP CLEANING PROCESS CONVERTS SEA WATER INTO DRINKABLE WATER...

Sep 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]  Written By Greg Candelario   FUTURISM 5 days ago water-filter_1024 In Brief This new technology uses a desalination technique that makes salt water into drinking water that sounds like it will be less expensive and more effective than reverse osmosis. The Breakthrough A team of researchers located at the Alexandria University in Egypt has recently developed a way wherein they can use a desalination technique known as pervaporation in order to eliminate salt from sea water and turn it into potable water. This process makes use of special synthetic membranes to filter the large salt particles including other impurities to allow their evaporation. The remaining fluid will then be heated up, vaporized and then converted back into drinking water. The Implications This new procedure can be a major positive impact for millions of lives...

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DRINKABLE BOOK: FILTERS WATER, SAVES MILLIONS OF LIVES....

Sep 17, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] This ‘Drinkable Book’ That Filters Water Will Save Millions of Lives It is called The Drinkable Book. Its pages are made from technologically advanced filter paper made of nanoparticles of silver nitrate that eliminate the bacteria behind waterborne diseases such a cholera, e-coli and hepatitis. Read more at: http://futurism.com/videos/this-drinkable-book-that-filters-water-could-save-millions-of-lives/?src=home...

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GLOBAL WARMING COULD LEAD TO WORLDWIDE WARS...

Sep 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   MARK KARLIN, EDITOR OF BUZZFLASH Will global warming lead to worldwide resource wars? (Photo: Environmental Illness Network) It would be a simplification to assert that the mass movement of refugees to Europe is currently primarily caused by global warming. As we’ve noted previously, wars of empire and economic deprivation have been the leading factors behind the recent surge of people struggling to reach the relative safety and economic stability of European Union nations. However, a September 9 article in the Guardian reports on the warning issued by the former head of Britain’s Liberal Democrats, Lord Paddy Ashdown, that “the world will undergo more resource wars and huge movements of desperate people unless it tackles climate change effectively.” Ashdown’s warning is based on both logical and scientific premises. If global warming damages or destroys the yield...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS QUESTION GEHRY-LED LOS ANGELES RIVER MASTERPLAN...

Aug 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]  by The Dirt Contributor The Los Angeles landscape architecture and design community was surprised by the recent announcement that Frank Gehry is creating a new masterplan for the redevelopment of the 51-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River that runs through the city. Before The Los Angeles Times published the details of the new Gehry-led team, there were no public discussions about this new approach or the selection of the new design team. Also, it’s not clear what will happen to the approved 2007 Los Angeles River Revitalization Master Plan (LARRMP). The LARRMP, led by engineering firm Tetra Tech, included three landscape architecture firms: Civitas, Mia Lehrer + Associates, and Wenk Associates. The plan is deeply rooted in hydrology and ecology, aims to strengthen communities, and features parks, trails, bridges, public and private facilities,...

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INVESTORS ARE GRABBING A JAPAN-SIZE CHUNK OF THE DEVELOPING WORLD FOR FOOD AND WATER...

Aug 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Activists tracking these deals say rich countries are buying up land—93 million acres—and displacing local people and wildlife. Employees of Saudi Star rice farm work in a paddy in Ethiopia. (Photo: Jenny Vaughan/AFP/Getty Images) Erica Gies is an independent journalist who writes about the core requirements for life—water and energy—from Victoria, British Columbia, and San Francisco. Bio Foreign investors are increasingly buying or leasing large swaths of developing countries in pursuit of food, water, and profit, according to human rights groups and academics, putting people and the environment at risk. In Papua, Indonesia, forests that have sustained Malind hunter-gatherers for millennia are being razed to make way for foreign-owned biofuels and industrial agriculture plantations in a government scheme called Merauke Integrated Food and Energy Estate, according to awasMIFEE, a U.K.-based...

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THIS SCI-FI NOVEL’S POST-APOCALYPTIC FUTURE COULD BECOME REALITY ALL TOO SOON...

Aug 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Ari Phillips CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: flickr/ Vibin JK   Our future selves are all characters in New York Times best-selling author Paolo Bacigalupi’s penetrating and environmentally driven sci-fi novel, The Water Knife, published by Knopf in May and an Amazon Best Book of June 2015. Note to future selves: don’t move to Phoenix. Why not? In the future Phoenix is even hotter, drier, and dustier than it already is. Also it is overrun by migrants from Texas — a state that has been left out to dry, literally, after prayers for rain fell on deaf ears — and hordes of others from across the West hoping to make it to the land of plenty, California, or of at least some, Nevada. Known as “Merry Perrys” after former-governor Rick Perry and his happy-go-lucky...

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WHY PLANETS WITH WATER MIGHT NOT NECESSARILY SUPPORT LIFE...

Aug 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]  In Brief A new study looks at so-called “waterworlds” finds that in worlds with potentially 100 times the amount of water on Earth the carbon cycle might not be hospitable for life. According to the study in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, these waterworlds have oceans so deep and wide that they won’t act like water on Earth. For instance, high-pressure water ice might form at the bottom of the ocean, preventing the carbon-silicate cycle observed on earth. Other reasons why recently proposed waterworlds might not support life acidic oceans. The study finds that certain planet sizes end up leading to positive-feedback carbon cycles — creating a runaway greenhouse effect and either making the planet too hot for life as we know it or too cold. Of course, there are...

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IS SECRET POWER BECOMING SACROSANCT IN THE U.S.?...

Aug 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Evaggelos Vallianatos, Speakout | Op-Ed I have lived in the United States for fifty-four years. I went to college where I learned the basics of science and history. I am grateful the University of Illinois and the University of Wisconsin gave me an excellent and free education. Harvard did the same thing with my postdoctoral studies in the history of science. A federal fellowship made that possible. I brought a passion for truth everywhere I worked, which was mostly on Capitol Hill and the US Environmental Protection Agency. I also taught at several universities. My work brought me face to face with a secret version of the US, not the country I thought about during my university studies. Secrets had something todo with this. I knew, of course, that individuals and...

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INSECTICIDE FOUND IN HALF OF SAMPLED U.S. STREAMS...

Aug 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Concern over bees, other non-target insects From KTVZ.COM news sources   RESTON, Va. – The U.S. Geological Survey found insecticides known as neonicotinoids in a little more than half of both urban and agricultural streams sampled across the nation and Puerto Rico, according to a study by the agency published Tuesday in Environmental Chemistry. This study, conducted from 2011 to 2014, represents the first national-scale investigation of the environmental occurrence of neonicotinoid insecticides in agricultural and urban settings. The research spanned 24 states and Puerto Rico and was completed as part of ongoing USGS investigations of pesticide and other contaminant levels in streams. “In the study, neonicotinoids occurred throughout the year in urban streams while pulses of neonicotinoids were typical in agricultural streams during crop planting season,” said USGS research chemist Michelle...

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