The Future of Life Depends on Bringing the 500-Year Rampage of the White Man to a Halt...

Dec 21, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Whites can play an important role in restraining other whites. By Frank Joyce / AlterNet The future of life on the planet depends on bringing the 500-year rampage of the white man to a halt. For five centuries his ever more destructive weaponry has become far too common. His widespread and better systems of exploiting other humans and nature dominate the globe. The time for replacing white supremacy with new values is now. And just as some whites played a part in ending slavery, colonialism, Jim Crow segregation, and South African apartheid, there is surely a role whites can play in restraining other whites in this era. Beneath the sound and fury generated by GOP presidential candidates, Fox News, website trolls, police unions and others, white people are becoming aware as never before...

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THIS IS WHY THEY’RE DENIERS: THE SCIENCE THAT GOES DEEP INTO THE ANTI-CLIMATE-CHANGE BRAIN...

Oct 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate change is obviously a real concern. So how do deniers close their minds to reality? A scientist explains Paul Rosenberg  SALON.COM (Credit: AP/Reuters/Joshua Lott/David Becker/Chris Keane/John Minchillo) Over the past two decades, the phenomenon of climate denial has come into focus almost as much as climate change itself. We’ve now reached the point where the Republican Party is virtually the only conservative party in the world that’s still playing ostrich when it comes to climate change. But is denialism alone enough to explain the psychological resistance to saving the planet? Canadian psychologist Robert Gifford, of the University of Victoria, doesn’t think so. In fact, he’s identified so many psychological barriers to action—what he calls “dragons of inaction”—that he’s organized them into seven main categories, or, if each dragon represents a “species,” seven...

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When Woman Is Boss: Nikola Tesla on Gender Equality and How Technology Will Unleash Women’s True Potential...

Jul 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Maria Popova   BRAIN PICKINGS The legendary inventor predicts “the acquisition of new fields of endeavor by women” and “their gradual usurpation of leadership.” Engineer, physicist, and futurist Nikola Tesla (July 10, 1856–January 7, 1943) is among the most radical rule-breakers of science and is regarded by many as the greatest inventor in human history. His groundbreaking work paved the way for wireless communication and imprinted every electrical device we use today. Without Tesla, I wouldn’t be writing these words on this keyboard and you wouldn’t be reading them on this screen. But like all true geniuses, Tesla envisioned not only the practical applications of his inventions but the profound cultural shifts that any successful technology precipitates. One of the most surprising, most obscure, yet most incisive of Tesla’s predictions peers into the...

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David Attenborough and Barack Obama Face-to-Face in TV Interview...

Jul 2, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Acclaimed naturalist plants – sometimes prickly – questions for U.S. president during visit to White House. By Esther Addley / The Guardian   VIA ALTERNET It sounds like a scenario from a fantasy dinner party: the most powerful man on the planet interviewing one of the world’s most beloved naturalists about his life story, about climate change and the future of life on Earth. But in May, it has emerged, this encounter did happen, when Barack Obama invited Sir David Attenborough to the White House for a televised discussion – in which he, the U.S. president, was to ask the questions of the broadcaster, not the other way round. In the interview, which was broadcast simultaneously in the U.K. and U.S. on BBC1 and BBC America on Sunday, Obama tells Attenborough: “I’ve been a...

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VISITING A HERO SURGEON

Jun 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] NYTimes.com » Nicholas Kristof   By NICHOLAS KRISTOF That’s me in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan, interviewing villagers as they fetch water. It’s a scary place to report from, because the Sudanese government periodically drops bombs on anything that moves. But if it’s scary for a visit, imagine working here day in, day out, amputating limbs and treating burns of those injured in the bombs – and doing all this as the government is dropping bombs on you. That’s what Dr. Tom Catena, an American surgeon is doing, and he’s the subject of my Sunday column. One of the pleasures of having a column is the privilege of shining a spotlight on some heroes of our time, and “Dr. Tom” is one of those heroes. I also wanted to highlight Dr. Tom because...

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THE ENERGY REVOLUTION HAS 1 PERCENTERS SHAKING IN THEIR BOOTS...

Jun 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Director Shalini Kantayya talks to Salon about the incredible potential of solar power Lindsay Abrams SALON.COM   When you hear about Richmond, California — on the environmental beat, at least — it’s usually in the context of the Chevron oil refinery, one of the country’s biggest, that casts its long shadow over the city. There was the fire and explosion in 2012 that sent toxic fumes into the surrounding Bay Area. There are the continuing worries about the long-term health effects facing the people who breathed those fumes in. There’s the everyday air pollution, and the everyday risk, that comes from living in the refinery’s vicinity and, more quietly, there’s the big money Chevron pumps into local elections to ensure none of this is examined too closely. “The only time you ever saw...

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Imagine a World Where Borders Are Based on Nature and Culture, Not Politics and War...

Apr 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Guided by watersheds, mountains and local knowledge, bioregionalism is a logical way to create boundaries. By Rachael Stoeve / YES! Magazine   VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: GothPhil/Flickr There’s little natural about the boundaries that divide states and countries. They’re often imaginary lines that result from history, conflict, or negotiation. But imagine what the world would look like if borders were set according to ecological and cultural boundaries. Bioregionalism says that’s the only logical way to divide up territory: Let watersheds, mountain ranges, microclimates, and the local knowledge and economies that exist in them guide the way we set boundaries. That way, life within those boundaries is tied together not by arbitrary decisions but by common interests. For instance, in the United States, there are many cases where ecologically and economically distinct areas are...

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DONALD AITKEN, PHD ON GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE...

Jan 30, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] WRITTEN TO CASEY COATES DANSON, DECEMBER 2014 AND A MUST READ! It’s really hard to know what to say about the future of global warming and climate change, or of the possibility that sufficient nations will take it seriously enough to reduce the growing threat on us and our children.  I tend to be pessimistic in that regard, and expect to see the global temperature rise considerably above the 2 degree C target. This week and next week the world’s nations are meeting in Lima, Peru, to try to craft the basis for a new binding agreement for reducing global warming emissions.  By next March it is hoped that all of the nations will be prepared to go public with their specific goals, much as the U.S. and China have just done (although...

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Are We Becoming a Theocracy? 4 Fundamentalist Ideologies That Threaten America...

Dec 7, 2014 Posted by

[Translate]   Visions   TruthOut.org / By Henry A. Giroux   VIA ALTERNET Extremists shape American politics to pursue legislative policies that favor the rich and punish the poor. December 2, 2014  | Americans seem confident in the mythical notion that the United States is a free nation dedicated to reproducing the principles of equality, justice and democracy. What has been ignored in this delusional view is the growing rise of an expanded national security state since 2001 and an attack on individual rights that suggests that the United States has more in common with authoritarian regimes like China and Iran “than anyone may like to admit.” I want to address this seemingly untenable notion that the United States has become a breeding ground for authoritarianism by focusing on four fundamentalisms: market fundamentalism, religious fundamentalism, educational...

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This graphic novelist tells the true story of climate change...

Oct 18, 2014 Posted by

[Translate] Philippe Squarzoni People Look who’s changing the world. By Sara Bernard   VIA GRIST   If Philippe Squarzoni knows one thing, it’s that a book can’t change the world. When the French graphic novelist — whose work tackles such hard-hitting topics as the Zapatista movement in Mexico and homicide rates in Baltimore — decided to put together a 500-page tome on climate change, he did so, he says, not out of any kind of activist agenda, but because “je ne pouvais pas ne pas le faire” — “I couldn’t not do it.” He never thought it would alter the trajectory of things, change anyone’s mind, or make people care. Nope: He claims it was simply because the problem was so vast and so all-encompassing. The more he learned about it, the bigger and scarier it got, and he just couldn’t to put it down....

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Simple Stories for Complicated Times...

Oct 9, 2014 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander Behavior Like many evangelists, Scott Edwards was once a heathen. In this case, his heathen ways involved the socially-acceptable, hard-charging, money-making, fast-car-driving, big-home-dwelling life of a Bay Area entrepreneur. After having an epiphany in the Utah desert (they’re very common there), Scott realized that his way of life was not bringing him the joy and connection he sought. He ditched the Bay Area, the fast car and startup life and moved to his hometown of Boulder, CO to simplify and be closer to nature. While the move proved somewhat helpful, after a decade or so he still found himself consumed by his work. He still resided in a 4800 sq ft home and felt burdened by many things that weren’t directly contributing to his happiness. In the last few years, Scott put the quest for simple...

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5 Most Important Lessons from “Cosmos”...

Jun 15, 2014 Posted by

[Translate] Salon.com / By Sarah Gray “Cosmos” may end on Sunday, but its lessons will keep us thinking for a long time to come. Photo Credit: Vadim Sadovski/Shutterstock.com June 7, 2014  | Sunday marks the finale of Neil deGrasse Tyson’s “Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey.” Though the wonderful hours of being dazzled, stunned and educated by Tyson and his “Ship of the Imagination” are coming to a close, there is still plenty about our cosmos left to ponder. (Let’s face it, we’ll probably rewatch the series and learn something new with each subsequent viewing.) Here are the most important scientific lessons from our astrophysicist pal, Neil deGrasse Tyson. 1) It’s okay not to know all of the answers. While it isn’t an eye-opening, earth-shattering revelation, knowing it’s okay not to have all the answers may...

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The Future of Food?

May 27, 2014 Posted by

[Translate]   TRUTHOUT   Imagine a fish farm and vegetable garden that produces 500,000 pounds of fresh fish and 150,000 heads of lettuce annually. Now imagine that the farm uses aquaponics, aquaculture and greenhouses, and is actually a reclaimed, bio-remediated wastewater treatment plant. Lastly, imagine that, despite being located less than four miles from the downtown area of a city of more than six million people, it is completely self-sustaining and leaves no carbon footprint. This lofty ideal is not a dream. It is in the process of becoming a reality. The farm is the brainchild of artist Jack Massing and restaurateur Rob Cromie, and the city is Houston, Texas. Rob Cromie (L) and Jack Massing (R) are working to transform an abandoned water treatment plant into a fish farm and vegetable garden. (Photo: Dahr...

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How America’s Spirit for Revolution Was Crushed...

Mar 20, 2014 Posted by

Today’s ‘revolutions’ are aimed not at liberating…

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Joseph Sax, Who Pioneered Environmental Law, Dies at 78...

Mar 14, 2014 Posted by

In 1970, as Americans were becoming increasingly alarmed…

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In Flood-Prone New Orleans, an Architect Makes Water His Ally...

Feb 25, 2014 Posted by

No city in the United States faces as grave…

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America Has Forgotten That We Don’t Have Freedom If We Don’t Have Free Time...

Feb 11, 2014 Posted by

The debate over Obamacare and voluntary work reduction…

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7 Huge Misconceptions About Communism (and Capitalism)...

Feb 4, 2014 Posted by

Most of what Americans think they know…

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Sun Worship: Natural Home & Garden...

Feb 3, 2014 Posted by

Two homes at extreme ends of the design spectrum..

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It’s Time to Remember Martin Luther King, The Radical...

Jan 22, 2014 Posted by

As the nation rediscovers poverty…

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“Danson House” Weekend Houses...

Jan 22, 2014 Posted by

“Weekend Houses takes you on a tour…

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“California Dream” Natural Home & Garden...

Jan 22, 2014 Posted by

Casey Coates Danson believes in saving the planet…

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Global Mash-up: The Next Enlightenment, Part I...

Dec 26, 2013 Posted by

How do you teach 7 billion people to respect their relationship with the Earth?

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Noam Chomsky: America Hates Its Poor...

Dec 1, 2013 Posted by

…Noam Chomsky on our country’s brutal class warfare —

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Mazria: We Must Design Out Carbon Emissions...

Nov 27, 2013 Posted by

Seven years ago, architect Ed Mazria started…

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