FUKUSHIMA — THE UNTOUCHABLE ECO-APOCALYPSE NO ONE IS TALKING ABOUT...

Oct 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Alex Pietrowski, Staff Writer Waking Times The most important ecological crisis of the world has ever seen has been underway since March 11th, 2011, yet there is nary a mention of it in the corporate media, and no political body in the world is championing its resolution. Widespread Denial and Willful Ignorance The media, politicians and the world at large seem to be engaging in extreme denial regarding Fukushima. A survey of mainstream media coverage of the fallout of this event reveals the trend of covering this story as a human interest affair, not as the immediate threat it truly is. The effects on nature are already being seen, yet even among the environmentalist factions of media, there is strong denial of the damage already done and of what is to come...

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AMY GOODMAN IS FACING PRISON FOR REPORTING ON THE DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE. THAT SHOULD SCARE US ALL!...

Oct 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Journalists and Journalism Environmental Activism Native Americans The charges against Goodman are a clear attack on journalism and freedom of the press. By Lizzy Ratner  THE NATION.COM Amy Goodman. (Aditya Ganapathiraju, CC BY-SA 2.0) This Monday afternoon, as the sun hits its peak over Mandan, North Dakota, the award-winning journalist, and host of Democracy Now!, Amy Goodman will walk into the Morton County–Mandan Combined Law Enforcement and Corrections Center and turn herself in to the local authorities. Her crime: good, unflinching journalism. Related Article The Arrest of Journalists and Filmmakers Covering the Dakota Pipeline Is a Threat to Democracy—and the Planet Josh Fox Goodman had the audacity to commit this journalism on September 3, when she was in North Dakota covering what she calls “the standoff at Standing Rock”: the months-long protests by thousands of Native...

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A FOOD FOREST GROWS IN BROOKLYN...

Oct 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART Swale aims to turn public art into public service by providing free fruits and vegetables to all. (Photo: Swaleny.org) Sarah McColl has written for Yahoo Food, Bon Appétit, and other publications. She’s based in Brooklyn, New York.   In the spring of 2010, The New York Times made a mistake that required more than a sidebar correction. “On Second Thought, Don’t Eat the Plants in the Park,” read the City Room blog headline. The story retracted earlier advice to pick the delicious day lily shoots in Central Park. It’s illegal, for starters—but there was something else.   “It’s like the old adage here,” Adrian Benepe, the city’s parks commissioner, told the paper. “If 15 people decide to go harvest day lilies to stir-fry that night, you could wipe out the entire...

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CLIMATE CHANGE IS UPON US. HOW ARE WE PLANNING FOR IT?...

Oct 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Steve Cochran, Steven Bingler   COMMONEDGE.COM In his 1972 science fiction novel The Gods Themselves, which takes place a century after an ecological and economic collapse that reduces the world’s population from six billion to two billion people, Isaac Asimov wrote: “The easiest way to solve a problem is to deny it exists.” For too long now, that has been the collective mindset toward climate change of too many. But the escalating rise of sea levels that might one day have been imagined as science fiction is now a reality. The result is that solutions that could once be addressed through mitigation may now require profound adaptation – and in many cases, at a massive urban scale. For decades, the scientific community has been sounding a clarion call for greater attention to carbon...

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COULD THE AMAZON RAINFOREST BE SAVED AS A ‘BIOLOGICAL FACTORY’?...

Oct 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Jan Rocha / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     The berries of the açaí palm have anesthetic and anti-inflammatory properties. (Kate Evans / CIFOR via Flickr) SÃO PAULO—Brazilian scientists, alarmed at the ongoing destruction of the Amazon rainforest, have proposed a radical plan to save it. This would ally the forest’s incredible biodiversity with the new technologies being developed as part of the 4th Industrial Revolution—the name coined for the fusion of technologies that blur the lines between the physical, digital and biological spheres. The technologies include biomimicry (production of materials by imitating nature – such as solar panels in the pattern of a leaf), gene editing and genomics, nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, robotics, the internet of things (where embedded software enables cars, buildings and other inanimate objects to communicate), and 3D...

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WHEN IT COMES TO BUILDINGS AND CLIMATE CHANGE, COLORADO MATTERS...

Oct 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE Victor Olgyay, AIA Principal Kelly Vaughn Marketing Manager Colorado regularly tops the list of most active and “fittest” states in the U.S. We love to hike, bike, ski, and really do anything outdoors. So do more than 77 million tourists who come to our state each year to visit national parks, ski and snowboard, and hike our lovely mountains. All of these activities rely on blue, pollution-free skies, open, natural spaces, and, of course, snow—all of which are being threatened by a warming planet. Buildings have an enormous impact on earth’s climate. Globally, they consume 35 percent of all energy and 60 percent of all generated electricity, making them the largest end-use energy sector, followed by industry and transportation. Buildings’ appetite for electricity—most of which is produced by fossil fuels—threatens...

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PARIS ALLOWS ANYONE TO PLANT AN URBAN GARDEN...

Oct 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lacy Cooke  INHABITAT.COM View Slideshow Paris just passed a new law that allows anyone to plant an urban garden within the city’s limits. Upon receiving a permit, gardeners can grow plants on walls, in boxes, on rooftops, under trees, or on fences. They can cultivate greenery in front of their homes or offices. They can grow flowers, vegetables, and fruit. Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo’s goal is to create 100 hectares of living walls and green roofs by the year 2020, with one third of that greenery dedicated to agriculture. Locals are encouraged to be “gardeners of the Parisian public space” under the new law. Gardeners must use sustainable methods, avoiding pesticides and promoting biodiversity in the city. They are asked to sign a “Charter of revegetation” and grow “local honey plants,” and...

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WORLD’S LARGEST PASSIVE HOUSE SETTLEMENT TOPS OFF IN GERMANY...

Oct 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT.COM View Slideshow The world’s largest passive house development just celebrated a topping out ceremony in a monumental step forward for sustainable architecture in Germany. Created by Frey Group, the energy-efficient Heidelberg Village is the epicenter of Bahnstadt, Heidelberg’s newest urban district where all buildings are designed to meet passive house standards. The new project is a “living community” emphasizing multigenerational living, access to green space, and a heterogenous neighborhood setup that encourages social interaction. Located on the land of a former old freight train terminal, the 116-hectare Bahnstadt celebrates sustainable architecture and diversity in its living, work, and cultural spaces all built to passive house standards for an ultra-low energy footprint. The 6,100-square-meter Heidelberg Village, located at the heart of Bahnstadt, encapsulates the urban development’s values with ecological...

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THE HOUSE OF 2016

Oct 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  ...

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AGROFORESTRY CAN BOOST PROFITS AND HELP SAVE THE PLANET...

Oct 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Paul Brown / Climate News Network     Trees planted as windbreaks for crops in Minnesota. (Eli Sagor via Flickr) LONDON—Feeding the world’s growing population in a rapidly warming world will not be possible with modern intensive agriculture that relies on cutting down more forests to plant crops, according to new research. The only way to produce enough crops and mitigate climate change at the same time is to adopt what the researchers have called agroforestry, a system of growing crops alongside trees and shrubs. In a paper published in Sustainability journal, scientists from the department of crop sciences at the University of Illinois, US, say one of the most difficult aspects of the idea is changing farmers’ attitudes. Adopting agroforestry Matt Wilson, a graduate student who has been talking to farmers...

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COAL WILL LAST ‘A THOUSAND YEARS,’ TRUMP SAYS “CLEAN COAL,” MMHM?...

Oct 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Samantha Page ThinkProgress. Climate change finally came up in a presidential debate. But, when it did, it was after Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump said we have to use our fossil fuel resources. “We need more than wind and solar,” Trump said during Sunday’s debate, in response to the lone energy question. “And look at the miners. Hillary Clinton wants to put the miners out of business,” he said, in his customary train-of-thought manner. “There is a thing call clean coal. Coal will last for a thousand years in this country.” In fact, attempts to achieve clean coal have mostly met with failure, including a billion-dollar boondoggle in Mississippi. It has also been widely criticized by climate and environmental activists, who say it will be catastrophic to embrace coal in any way....

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A NEW MOLECULAR STRUCTURE COULD HELP US DEAL WITH NUCLEAR WASTE...

Oct 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS FUTURISM.COM In Brief Researchers have developed a “supramolecule” born of two negatively charged molecules, defying the 250-year-old Coulomb’s law. The technique used to create the “supramolecule” could strip sulfate molecules from nuclear waste to help protect water from contamination. TWO NEGATIVES MAKE A…? Scientists have broken a 250-year-old rule of chemistry with the discovery of a new molecular structure. The study, which appears in the German scientific journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition, says researchers created a “supramolecule” born of a bond between two negatively charged molecules of bisulfate. Credit: Indiana University Until very recently, scientists argued how it’s impossible for negatively-charged molecules with hydrogen atoms attached — like bisulfate — to form viable chemical bonds. “An anion-anion dimerization of bisulfate goes against simple expectations of Coulomb’s law,” said Indiana University professor Amar...

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INNOVATIVE WATER-GEN MACHINE HARVESTS UP TO 825 GALLONS OF CLEAN WATER FROM THIN AIR IN A DAY...

Oct 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Medlock  INHABITAT View Slideshow You might remember from grade school science class that water vapor is all around us, taking part in a continuous cycle that fills the clouds, lakes, and oceans with moisture. The people at Water-Gen have found a way to draw this moisture out of the air to produce clean drinking water for those who have none. The device can yield up to 825 gallons of water per day, making it a necessity for inhabitants of a warming planet. Water-Gen’s unique system is built to harvest condensation out of thin air. Three sizes of these water-generating machines use an array of plastic “leaves” that funnel warm and humid air through the device. The largest unit can produce 825 gallons of water per day at 80 degrees and 60...

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GREEN-ROOFED COLORADO HOME IS BURIED INTO THE EARTH TO SAVE ENERGY...

Oct 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT View Slideshow When New York-based architecture firm Gluck+ was tapped to build a home in the stunning Colorado Rocky Mountains, the architects knew they would be remiss if they didn’t minimize the visual impact of their design. As a result, the firm created House in the Mountains, a green-roofed guesthouse that’s partially buried underground and blends into the landscape. The handsome sunken home also saves on energy use thanks to the earth’s thermal inertia and with solar panels. The 2,850-square-foot House in the Mountains comprises two rectilinear steel-framed forms that intersect to form the corner of a swimming pool and an implied courtyard that extends to the existing main house. The primary sloped structure rises from to the south at a 20-degree angle and houses the open-plan living, dining,...

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CLINTON CAMPAIGN TAPS AL GORE TO HELP SOLVE THEIR MILLENNIAL PROBLEM...

Oct 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Natasha Geiling Reporter at ThinkProgress. They can engage young voters who care about climate change. CREDIT: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong Former vice president Al Gore knows a thing or two about climate change. He also happens to have had a very personal — and public — experience with the power of third party voters. So when Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign needed someone to help them galvanize Millennial support — a demographic the Democratic candidate has struggled to win over, and one that tends to be especially engaged with climate change — it makes sense they would turn to Gore. Since losing the 2000 presidential election to George W. Bush, Gore has become a stalwart advocate for climate action, most notably with the 2006 documentary An Inconvenient Truth. But will having Gore’s help be enough to woo young environmentalists? “Climate is a huge motivator...

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DECLINE OF BEES FORCED CHINA’S APPLE FARMERS TO POLLINATE BY HAND...

Oct 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Dave Goulson  CHINA DIALOGUE.NET The decline of wild bees in China threatens more than just its apple and pear harvests, says pollination expert Dave Goulson. About 75% of all crops require pollination by bees or other species (Image copyright: International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, Nepal) In the last 50 years, the global human population has nearly doubled, while the average calories consumed per person has increased by about 30%. To cope with the ever growing demand for food, more land has been brought into agricultural production, mainly by clearing forests, and farming has become much more intensive. Fertilisers, pesticides, and development of new plant varieties have allowed farmers to increase the average yield of food per hectare to increase by 130% in the same period. It is obvious that this pattern cannot...

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THE MEANING OF ARMORED VEHICLES ROLLING TOWARD STANDING ROCK...

Oct 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Jenni Monet, YES! Magazine | News Analysis Catcher Cuts The Road, an Army veteran, leads a protest march to a sacred burial ground at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota, on September 9, 2016. (Photo: Alyssa Schukar / The New York Times) When opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline galvanized the support of hundreds of US tribes, it became an unprecedented show of Indian Country unity and resolve. Now, it’s a global indigenous movement. Members of tribal communities from around the world have joined in activism led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. A Sami group from Norway was the latest to arrive on Friday. This resistance campaign, many say, has emerged as part of a greater global crisis — a united struggle in which indigenous lands, resources, and...

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9 OF THE MOST HIGH-PROFILE CLIMATE DENIERS...

Oct 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment Donald Trump, James Inhofe and Rupert Murdoch are among the prominent climate deniers engaged in a deliberate misinformation campaign. By Michael Mann / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET   James Inhofe, Donald Trump, Rupert Murdoch Photo Credit: L: James Inhofe (U.S. Embassy Kyiv Ukraine); C: Donald Trump (Gage Skidmore); R: Rupert Murdoch (Ben Terrett) / Flickr Earlier this month, my co-author Tom Toles (the Pulitzer-winning editorial cartoonist for The Washington Post) and I published our new book, The Madhouse Effect: How Climate Change Denial Is Threatening Our Planet, Destroying Our Politics, and Driving Us Crazy. Some great early reviews of the book can be found here, here, here, here, here, here and here. Tom and I had a commentary excerpting parts of the book The Washington Post on September 19. In addition to calling out the most prominent current climate change denier of them all—Donald Trump, we profiled eight other...

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The world’s fourth-largest emitter ratifies Paris climate agreement Getting India on board is a huge deal for global climate action....

Oct 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Natasha Geiling   THINK PROGRESS   CREDIT: AP PHOTO/GURINDER OSAN, FILE On Sunday, October 2 — the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi — India formally ratified the Paris climate agreement, bringing the total number of countries that have officially joined the historic pact to 62, representing 51.89 percent of global emissions. That places the agreement on the brink of entering into force, as it requires 55 countries representing 55 percent of global emissions to ratify the treaty domestically before it officially kicks in. The European Union — whose 28 member states account for about 10 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions — has indicated it will ratify the agreement in a vote Tuesday, October 3, meaning the agreement could enter into force as early as November. “We are now on the verge of entry into force for the Paris Agreement at a pace...

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How Do We Transition from a World of Domination and Extraction to a World of Resilience and Regeneration?...

Oct 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Local Peace Economy At the New Economy Coalition conference, activists build the road by walking. By Mariana Mendoza / AlterNet Photo Credit: CODEPINK How do we transition from a world of domination and extraction to a world of resilience and regeneration? How do we move away from a system that has been ingrained in most of our daily activities and thoughts and grow with the values that support justice and wellness? Throughout my work in the social, economic and environmental justice movement, I have been asking these questions and trying to figure out how to be resilient and regenerative and not repeat the failures of the exploitative and extractive economy. This July, I had the great opportunity to attend to to the New Economy Coalition’s conference CommonBound, where brilliant and powerful people got...

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BREAKING POINT: AMERICA APPROACHING A PERIOD OF DISINTEGRATION, ARGUES ANTHROPOLOGIST PETER TURCHIN...

Oct 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Anthropologist Peter Turchin’s “Ages of Discord” provides a crucial decoder ring for Trump-era social strife Paul Rosenberg SALON.COM   As the 2016 campaign reaches fever pitch, the more heat there is and the less light is shed. Which is why evolutionary anthropologist Peter Turchin’s new book comes as such a breath of fresh air. “Ages of Discord: A Structural-Demographic Analysis of American History” is not about this year’s presidential election, per se, but it’s a quantum leap forward in illuminating the disintegrative trends that America has experienced over the last several decades that are currently driving our politics. Everything from skyrocketing inequality and political gridlock to white working class angst and the rise of mass shootings and other troubling signs of our times — these are all interconnected reflections of where America is...

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BUILDING A BETTER ‘BURB’: THE RACE TO DESIGN A SUSTAINABLE SUBURBIA IS ALSO MAKING THE SUBURBS KIND OF COOL...

Oct 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Ecological concerns have led to a long overdue look at the design of suburbs. The results could be revolutionary Diane Stopyra   SALON.COM Topics: Editor’s Picks, New Urbanism, suburban sprawl, suburbia, urban planning, Innovation News, Sustainability News Cite, New Mexico(Credit: Perkins+Will) Suburbia is an easy target. But its problems run deeper than disillusioned housewives waking up from their American dreams in cookie-cutter colonials. Suburban living is not environmentally sustainable — at least, not yet. But a new crop of designers, architects and urban planners is envisioning a world in which minivans, manicured lawns and mail carriers are replaced by autonomous cars — aka, suburbia 2.0. While cities conjure up images of smog clouds and smokestacks, studies show the carbon footprint of a typical suburban home is four times greater than that of an urban dwelling:  Larger households require more heating and cooling....

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REPORT: NEW TECHNOLOGY CAN MINIMIZE IMPACTS OF INDUSTRIAL FISH FARMS...

Oct 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Researchers say controversial aquaculture operations like one planned for the Southern California coast could be environmentally sustainable. A fish farm in China. (Photo: Xinhua/Chu Yang via Getty Images) Katharine Gammon has written for Nature, Wired, Discover, and Popular Science. A new mom, she lives in Santa Monica.   The United States imports more than 90 percent of its fish, and more than half of that is grown on overseas fish farms. So why not establish aquaculture operations closer to home? “The benefits of creating a robust aquaculture system are significant, and Southern California could serve as a model for the nation,” said Jerry Schubel, president of the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California. Advertisement The aquarium was a partner in a study released Tuesday analyzing the viability of aquaculture operations in...

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EPA PLANS TO ALLOW UNLIMITED DUMPING OF FRACKING WASTEWATER IN THE GULF OF MEXICO...

Oct 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] This article originally appeared on Truthout Environmentalists are warning the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that its draft plan to continue allowing oil and gas companies to dump unlimited amounts of fracking chemicals and wastewater directly into the Gulf of Mexico is in violation of federal law. In a letter sent to EPA officials last week, attorneys for the Center for Biological Diversity warned that the agency’s draft permit for water pollution discharges in the Gulf fails to properly consider how dumping wastewater containing chemicals from fracking and acidizing operations would impact water quality and marine wildlife. The attorneys claim that regulators do not fully understand how the chemicals used in offshore fracking and other well treatments – some of which are toxic and dangerous to human and marine life – can impact marine...

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5 Reasons to Protect Arizona’s Greater Grand Canyon...

Sep 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment A national monument designation for this critical watershed would ensure its protection for future generations. By Mike Matz / Pew Charitable Trusts   VIA ALTERNET View of Colorado River, Page, Arizona, US Photo Credit: Nfoto/Shutterstock The proposed Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument, composed of public lands that surround its famous namesake, is filled with rugged cliffs, pine forests, deep canyons, and grasslands. While this area protects clean drinking water for this parched region, and provides it to millions of people living downstream, the land also supports countless opportunities for outdoor recreation. The Colorado River and its underground springs supply clean water that millions of people downstream rely on—but pollution from some mining and clear-cutting activities threatens this source. (image © Kristen M. Caldon) 1. Protect clean water. World-renowned for its whitewater, the Colorado...

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INHABITAT INTERVIEW: Green Architect & Cradle to Cradle Founder William McDonough...

Sep 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] /wiki/Sustainable_design”>green design movement and one of the preeminent thought-leaders of our time. His approach to sustainable design spans the entire industry – from large-scale projects (like designing the largest and most ambitious green roof in the world) to developing the most rigorous green product standard available. We recently had the opportunity to speak with Bill at the GreenBuild Conference about his work and the future of green design. We were joined by Howard Williams, VP of Construction Specialties, a leading proponent of safe materials in products, who introduced the company’s latest Cradle to Cradle-certified products. The thought-provoking and energetic conversation gave us a taste of how intimately intertwined design is with a product’s real-world impact – read on for our exclusive interview! INHABITAT: What inspired you to write ‘Cradle to Cradle‘ (the book)...

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STANDING FIRM AT STANDING ROCK: WHY THE STRUGGLE IS BIGGER THAN ONE PIPELINE...

Sep 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Sarah Jaffe / Moyers & Company   A “speak-out” on the road to the Dakota Access pipeline construction site earlier in September. (Sarah Jaffe for BillMoyers.com) The first sign that not everything is normal as you drive down Highway 1806 toward the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota is a checkpoint manned by camouflage-clad National Guard troops. The inspection on Sept. 13 was perfunctory; they simply asked if we knew “what was going on down the road” and then waved us through, even though the car we rode in had “#NoDAPL” chalked on its rear windshield. “What is going on down the road” is a massive camp-in led by the Standing Rock nation, aimed at blocking the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (the DAPL in question), which would carry oil...

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ASLA LAUNCHES GUIDE TO RESILIENT DESIGN...

Sep 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] ASLA Launches Guide to Resilient Design THE DIRT  Jared Green Resilient design / ASLA A new online guide launched today by the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) explains how communities can better protect themselves from natural disasters through resilient landscape planning and design. According to the guide, the goal of resilient landscape planning and design is to retrofit communities to recover more quickly from extreme events, now and in the future. In an era when disasters can cause traditional, built systems to fail, adaptive, multilayered systems can maintain their vital functions and are often the more cost-effective and practical solutions. The guide is organized around disruptive events that communities now experience: drought, extreme heat, fire, flooding, and landslides. Biodiversity loss is an underlying threat also explored. The guide includes hundreds of case studies...

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IT’S TIME FOR EVERY ALLY TO SHOW UP IN THE FIGHT AGAINST THE DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE...

Sep 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   The temporary halt to the pipeline’s construction must be made permanent. By Tom Goldtooth and Annie Leonard   THE NATION.COM People against the Dakota Access Pipeline chant in opposition on Thursday, August 11, 2016, at a site where a roadway was being constructed to begin the process of building the pipeline. (AP Photo / Tom Stromme) Over the last month, thousands of Native Americans from across the country have converged to camp in and around the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota to oppose the construction of the multibillion-dollar Dakota Access oil pipeline. The pipeline, which would transfer crude oil to existing pipelines in Illinois, would come within a half-mile of the reservation and cross culturally significant ancestral sites. It would also run under the Missouri River, an important water source for...

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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT COULD FEED THE WORLD’S GROWING POPULATION AND PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT...

Sep 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     African farmers using cattle to thresh wheat in Eritrea, a region vulnerable to climate change. (David Stanley via Flickr) LONDON—More than half of all the world’s maize crops and around a third of all wheat and rice will be grown in regions vulnerable to climate change in the next 50 to 100 years, according to new research. At the same time, the world’s population will grow to 9 billion, and global food production will need to rise by from 60% to 110% by 2050 to keep up with demand. Such changes will inevitably hit the poorest nations hardest, and will put at hazard the planet’s remaining wilderness areas and the surviving wild plants and animals that keep ecosystems stable. But a...

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