DUBAI MAKES A STRONG PUSH FOR CLEAN ENERGY, WILL MAKE SOLAR POWER MANDATORY BY 2030...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] mre Solt/ Wiki Commons FUTURISM In Brief Dubai announces commendable initiatives focusing on the use of clean and renewable energy for 2030. Solar Power Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid recently unveiled Dubai’s Clean Energy Strategy 2050, and there is a notable renewable energy target: Mandatory use of rooftop solar power by 2030. “Through this strategy, which is based on innovation, research and development, we aim to explore the future of the energy sector to unveil initiatives that will make use of the scientific and technological developments in this sector and take the lead in their development and application,” said Shaikh Mohammad in a release. This announcement complements the country’s goal of generating 75% of the city’s energy via solar power by 2050. Ultimately, by 2030, the country hopes to reach  25% of this goal. In order to accomplish this...

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Starbucks’ Deforestation-Free Pledge Is a Total Joke...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The world’s largest coffeehouse company needs to wake up and smell the coffee. By Elliot Negin / The Huffington Post   VIA ALTERNET   SCARSDALE, NY – SEPTEMBER 15, 2013: A tall Starbucks coffee in front of a woman working on a laptop computer. Photo Credit: Sean Wandzilak / Shutterstock.com Starbucks has a bigger problem than the controversy over its new red holiday cup. It’s still buying palm oil and other agricultural products that might be linked to tropical forest destruction, and a coalition of science, environmental and labor organizations isn’t happy about it. Today that coalition sent a letter to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz (above) urging him to strengthen his company’s procurement policy to ensure it doesn’t contribute to deforestation, a significant cause of global warming. The commodities in question include wood, paper products and palm oil,...

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A KINDER, GREENER NEW YORK CITY...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture Living in New York City can be many things: exciting, dynamic, culturally rich, god awfully expensive. But one thing it is not for most people is natural: unless you live directly on a park, your everyday exposure to nature might be limited to a handful of sidewalk trees, used as much for canine territorial outposts as natural beautifiers. But if the Green Line by Perkins Eastman Architects goes through, connecting with nature in one of the most concrete-laden lands in the world might get a lot easier. The Green Line would create a green corridor along Broadway, connecting Union Square in the south to Central Park in the north. Including the area of the park, this would effectively create a five mile green corridor from 14th to 110th...

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HAFENCITY’S FLOOD-PROOF DESIGN IN GERMANY CAN CHEAT RISING SEA LEVELS...

Dec 17, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Medlock   INHABITAT Hamburg, Germany is one of the world’s many cities threatened by rising sea levels, yet its development of the eco-friendly HafenCity district may be part of the solution. The island sits a mere 4.5 or 5 meters above sea level, yet instead of abandoning the area and moving inward, the city has developed HafenCity into a model of sustainability for its 2,000 residents. Even more impressive is its simple solution to annual flooding and the effects of climate change. The area used to be an industrial harbor, yet now houses thousands of citizens in swanky, solar-powered apartments and entertains visitors with commercial spaces in “the new downtown” Hamburg. HafenCity has strict policies about new developments, requiring them to adhere to the Gold Standard, or the equivalent of LEED Platinum...

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PLUG & PLAY SOLARPOD CAN BE INSTALLED ON ANY ROOF – WITHOUT DRILLING A SINGLE HOLE...

Dec 17, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Colin Payne  INHABITAT Solar power is taking the nation by storm, but one challenge some homeowners face is how to mount them on roofs that you can’t punch holes through. SolarPod, a new technology that just got its UL certification, offers a system that mounts to any roof type – without the need to drill holes. This is particularly useful for gable roofs. Designed to withstand 130 mile-per-hour winds, the SolarPod system also cuts installation costs and allows for easy system expansion. The first of its kind, SolarPod’s recent certification received a Class A fire rating that puts it on par with other solar systems from around the world. According to Cleantechnica, SolarPod Grid Tied is an integrated and modular “plug & play solar system that can be tilt adjusted (for any...

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Leading the Way: Here Are 3 of World’s Most Sustainable Communities...

Dec 17, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] These towns aren’t waiting for world leaders to take charge on climate change. YES! Magazine   VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: TeWeBs/Wikimedia Commons Explore three communities across the world that are leading the way in clean energy. These towns aren’t waiting for world leaders to take charge on climate change. Instead, they are doing what they can, right now, to transition away from fossil fuels and work toward an environmentally sustainable future. This is an episode of “In the World,” an original series by Fusion that features people, places around the world on the cutting edge of the green energy...

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GARDEN CITY, MEGA CITY

Dec 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by The Dirt Contributor An increase in density doesn’t have to mean a decrease in the quality of life. Quality of life can be ensured with improved access to communal green space, which doesn’t have to be limited to parks on the ground. In a lecture at Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD), Wong Mun Summ and Richard Hassell, the founders of WOHA, an architecture firm based in Singapore, depicted enormous residential towers that are lush and verdant, with vines spilling over the edges of shared balcony gardens, and trees and shrubs covering the rooftops, creating a dense, leafy canopy. Vertical surfaces are swathed in healthy greenery. I marveled at their rendering skills before realizing that they were showing built projects. Summ and Hassell named their lecture “Garden City, Mega City,” suggesting...

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VIDEO: MEET THE ARCHITECT WHO BUILDS SOLAR HOMES FROM RECYCLED MATERIALS...

Dec 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Kate Yoder   GRIST In Taos, N.M., recycled tires are the building blocks for a community of radical, off-the-grid homes called “Earthships.”Meet their architect, Michael Reynolds. He’s the rugged, eccentric star of a seven-minute short film from The Atlantic, directed by Flora Lichtman and Katherine Wells for The Adaptors podcast, which gives us a snapshot of life in these captivating solar homes built from natural and recycled materials.Even though his architectural vision appears to be centered around the idea of sustainability, Reynolds isn’t your typical environmentalist. In the film, he says, “I’m so sick of recycling and sustainable and green and organic. They’re rhetoric things.” However, he doesn’t shy away from climate change — quite the contrary, in fact. “I’m not going to argue with the people dancing on the top level of the Titanic before...

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Dozens of Nations Back Regenerative Farming Initiative That Can Help Solve Global Warming...

Dec 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Food The U.S.—a primary driver of the climate crisis—still isn’t on board with this historic climate agreement. By Katherine Paul, Ronnie Cummins / AlterNet Photo Credit: GlebStock/Shutterstock.com France, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, the U.K., Germany and Mexico are among more than two dozen countries that have signed on to an agreement that one day may be recognized as the most significant climate initiative in history.France’s 4/1000 Initiative: Soils for Food Security and Climate puts regenerative food and farming front and center in the climate solutions conversation. This is why the Organic Consumers Association, its Mexico affiliate Via Organica, IFOAM Organics International and more than 50 other activist allies across the globe have signed on in support of the Initiative. Unfortunately, the U.S. government is not yet on board with the plan, even though our...

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FRACKING EXPANDS IN LATIN AMERICA, THREATENING TO CONTAMINATE WORLD’S THIRD-LARGEST AQUIFIER...

Dec 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Fracking Spanning an area that includes southern Brazil and part of Paraguay, Argentina and Uruguay, the Guaraní Aquifer holds 20 percent of South America’s water. By Santiago Navarro, Renata Bessi / Truthout   VIA ALTERNET December 11, 2015 Photo Credit: Calin Tatu/Shutterstock.com Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking – a method whereby hydrocarbons trapped within rocks are extracted – is expanding rapidly in Latin America. Fracking emits benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene, which are considered by the World Health Organization to be carcinogenic and responsible for blood disorders and other immunological effects. Despite these adverse health effects, however, reserves have already been mapped out in Bolivia, Colombia, Venezuela, Paraguay, Uruguay, Chile, Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. In Mexico, recently passed energy reform legislation promotes fracking as a means of extracting shale gas – and with the reform,...

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IN HISTORIC PARIS CLIMATE DEAL, WORLD UNANIMOUSLY AGREES NOT TO BURN MOST FOSSIL FUELS...

Dec 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm  CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Twitter/Pedro Sirgado   In a literally world-changing deal that was almost unthinkable just a year ago, some two hundred leading nations unanimously embraced a plan that will leave most of the world’s fossil fuels unburned. As part of a concerted effort to avoid catastrophic climate change, the world unanimously committed to an ongoing effort of increasingly deeper emissions reductions aimed at keeping total warming “to well below 2°C [3.6°F] above preindustrial levels.” The full text of this Paris Agreement goes even further, with the parties agreeing “to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5°C above preindustrial levels, recognizing that this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change.” Already, global coal use appears to be plateauing, and global oil use will likely follow...

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VIDEO: What Does Climate Change Have to Do With Hunger in America?...

Dec 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By The Nation On October 27, 2015, the Sacramento Public Library hosted a discussion in honor of The Nation‘s 150th anniversary. In this recording, you’ll see Nation contributor Sasha Abramsky expose just how many Americans go hungry every day in a country that produces more food than any other. Nation environment correspondent Mark Hertsgaard unravels the myth of food scarcity in the face of climate change. Amber Stott, director of Sacramento’s Food Literacy Center  reveals how malnutrition in our own backyards are making children susceptible to previously adult diseases. Chanowk Yisrael, founder of Yisrael Family Urban Farm, outlines his transition from the tech industry to urban agriculture, and the impact of gentrification on food deserts. Lesley McClurg, food and sustainability reporter for Capital Public Radio, moderates the...

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RENEWABLE ENERGY AFTER COP21: NINE ISSUES FOR CLIMATE LEADERS TO THINK ABOUT ON THE JOURNEY HOME...

Dec 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Richard Heinberg  POST CARBON INSTITUTE Download as PDF COP21 in Paris is over. Now it’s back to the hard work of fighting for, and implementing, the energy transition. We all know that the transition away from fossil fuels is key to maintaining a livable planet. Several organizations have formulated proposals for transitioning to 100 percent renewable energy; some of those proposals focus on the national level, some the state level, while a few look at the global challenge. David Fridley (staff scientist of the energy analysis program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory) and I have been working for the past few months to analyze and assess many of those proposals, and to dig deeper into energy transition issues—particularly how our use of energy will need to adapt in a ~100 percent renewable future. We...

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AFRICAN NATIONS COMMIT TO GAME-CHANGING REFORESTATION PLAN...

Dec 13, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] An ambitious agreement announced at the Paris climate talks would create 78 million acres of forest by 2030. Tree saplings are watered by hand in a reforestation project in Ghana. (Photo: Universal Images Group via Getty Images) TAKE PART John R. Platt covers the environment, technology, philanthropy, and more for Scientific American, Conservation, Lion, and other publications.   Africa could be a much greener place in 15 years. An ambitious new program announced this week at the Paris climate conference anticipates the restoration of 386,000 square miles of degraded and deforested land across the continent. The African Forest Landscape Restoration Initiative (AFR100) has secured commitments from six nations to restore 78.3 million acres and has pending promises from four more countries. The program has been officially adopted by the African Union, and international...

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TOMORROW’S WORKPLACE WILL HAVE VIRTUAL-REALITY PODS AND IN-OFFICE VEGETABLE PLOTS, SAY STUDENTS...

Dec 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Tamy Cozier The day-long Workspace Invader event asked 16 students to design the office of the future. Renderings courtesy HÅG/ING Media Given the constant proliferation of new technologies, it’s hard to say with any certainty what the workplace of the future will look like. Undeterred, design professionals continue to do their best at speculating—often via competitions and workshops—and many of their radical creations often appear ripped from sci-fi storyboards. In November, as part of a one-day workshop, 16 London-based students were tasked with illustrating their ideal future-oriented workplace. The event, called Workspace Invader, paired students with eight leading architects from several U.K. practices who helped them draft their concepts for the offices of tomorrow. The results were fantastic—holograms, virtual-reality rooms, and in-office vegetable plots all figured into their collective vision. “It was amazing to see how diverse our ideas were and how optimistic...

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MICRO GOES EVEN MORE MAINSTREAM...

Dec 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture When LifeEdited began several years ago, the micro housing conversation was happening but primarily in small pockets–the odd tiny house in northern California, Gary Chang’s transforming Hong Kong apartment and so. But in the last few years, spurred by things like the adAPT NYC competition and, we like to think, our own efforts, the micro-housing movement has grown considerably and become far more mainstream. Its growth is further evidenced by this short feature by Katie Couric on her Yahoo News program. The feature includes LifeEdited CEO Graham Hill in the LifeEdited apartment as well as other projects we’ve covered recently such as Jeff Wilson in his Kasita prototype apartment in Austin TX and NYC’s Carmel Place micro-apartment building. Ultimately, we hope mainstream media features like this have a normalizing effect...

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ROBERT POLLIN SHOWS US THAT “GREENING THE GLOBAL ECONOMY” IS DOABLE...

Dec 11, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Bill Scher  AMERICANS FOR A SAFE FUTURE Above: Economist and author Robert Pollin discusses his latest book, “Greening the Global Economy,” with Isaiah J. Poole while at a congressional briefing in Washington December 8. The expected Paris climate agreement will be a landmark achievement, not just for the environment, but for peace. Never before has the entire world come together to save each other from harm. But the fight to protect the climate will not be over. The pledges made by each country will not be enough on their own to sufficiently limit the rise in global temperatures. What is our next step? Prof. Robert Pollin, co-director of the Political Economy Research Institute at University of Massachusetts-Amherst, has laid out a road map in his new book “Greening The Global Economy.” He has done...

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CONGRESS MOVES TO SABOTAGE THE PARIS CLIMATE SUMMIT...

Dec 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Elizabeth Kolbert   THE NEW YORKER House Speaker Paul Ryan, and other congressional Republicans, are signalling a lack of support for the climate talks. House Speaker Paul Ryan, and other congressional Republicans, are signalling a lack of support for the climate talks. Credit Photograph by Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via AP Don’t trust the United States: as the international climate summit in Paris grinds along, this is the message Republicans in Congress are trying to send the delegates. The logic, such as it is, of the claim is that merely by making it the House G.O.P. goes a long way toward proving its validity. On Tuesday, at a news conference in Paris, President Barack Obama exhorted negotiators to keep in mind what is at stake at the summit. “This one trend—climate change—affects all...

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ENERGY GAME-CHANGERS LOOK TO THE FUTURE...

Dec 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     New ways are being developed to capture and store maximum power from sun and wind. (lutmans via Flickr) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. PARIS—Researchers now know how to keep the whole of the US powered by wind, water and sunlight without ever needing to fall back on emergency fossil fuel generators. They have also discovered how to extract hydrogen from methane without spilling any greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. And they have worked out a new and simple way to get the best available power from a wind turbine, and how to charge pocket electronic devices without plugging them into a socket. None of these technologies is ready for the market yet, and one of them exists...

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HERE’S HOW THE AIRLINE INDUSTRY COULD CUT ITS EMISSIONS IN HALF...

Nov 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Nick Stockton   GRIST This story was originally published by Wired and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Fuel economy is hardwired into the airline industry’s DNA. After all, fuel costs money, and using less of the stuff is an easy way to beef up the bottom line. Well … maybe not easy, but certainly worth doing. Saving fuel, by reducing carbon emissions, can help save the planet. And those cuts could come at little to no cost to the companies themselves. At least, that’s what a bunch of researchers in the U.K. think. They estimate — in a new paper published today in Nature Climate Change — that airlines can cut emissions in half by the year 2050. Those savings would come in the form of things like new aircraft designs, fuel...

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CALIFORNIA’S FIRST OFF SHORE WIND POWER PROJECT FACES ENVIRONMENTAL HEADWINDS...

Nov 21, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY The state wants more renewable energy, but environmental restrictions make getting projects off the ground difficult. The cruise liner Queen Mary 2 passes the Burbo Bank Offshore Wind Farm in the Irish Sea. (Photo: Phil Noble/Reuters) Nov 20, 2015 Editor, reporter, and radio producer Zachary Slobig has covered coastal issues for Outside, NPR, Los Angeles Times, and many others.   Pollution-free, renewable energy for some 300,000 homes could arrive on the California coast in the next decade if a new wind farm plan can navigate the contentious climate that thus far has derailed all offshore power projects in the state since 1969. Offshore wind development firm Trident Winds wants to put 100 floating wind turbines—tethered to the seafloor with a system of cables—15 miles off the coast from Morro Bay....

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WE CAN MIMIC NATURE TO BETTER MANAGE WATER...

Nov 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Liz Camuti If it weren’t for us, bison and beavers might still roam Chicago, Illinois, the location of the 2015 ASLA Annual Meeting and Expo. The absence of these keystone species, which once provided important roles in the continental water cycle, represents a marked shift in national ecosystem functioning. However, landscape architects and engineers from Andropogon Associates and Biohabitats are thinking about how to bring back the ecosystem services these species once provided in order to more sustainably manage water. “We’re not bringing bison back to the edge of Chicago where they would have been, but looking at their functionality, the lessons that can be learned from them. Their ecosystems were widespread and featured a highly-decentralized water management system,” said Keith Bowers, FASLA, president of Biohabitats. “We need to ask ourselves how we can turn...

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VERTICAL FOREST FOR LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND...

Nov 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   stefano boeri plans second ‘vertical forest’ for Lausanne, Switzerland stefano boeri plans second ‘vertical forest’ for lausanne, switzerland all images courtesy of stefano boeri architetti       italian architect stefano boeri has been chosen to build a 117 meter-tall residential tower in lausanne, switzerland. the project, which bears many similarities with boeri’s ‘bosco verticale’ in milan, will be home to more than 100 trees as part of 3,000 square meters of greenery. apartment units protrude from the structure offering views towards the adjacent lake geneva. named ‘la tour des cedres’, work on the building is set to get underway in 2017, with a completion date yet to be established. stefano boeri’s milan-based studio will develop the scheme in collaboration with studio laura gatti and burohappold engineering. the highrise will be home...

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GOING OFF FOSSIL FUELS WOULD BOOST DISPOSABLE INCOME ANDCREATE A MILLION JOBS...

Nov 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Bob Leverone Construction jobs in clean sources of electricity are expected to boom under a low-carbon scenario.   A new report has found that transitioning to a clean energy economy would be an economic boon to the United States, increasing employment, reducing costs to consumers, and benefiting investors. The report, from NextGen Climate America, showed that investment in efficiency, renewable sources of electricity, and fuel switching — such as moving from fossil fuel-powered cars to electric vehicles — would add a million jobs by 2030, and roughly 2 million jobs by 2050, while increasing GDP by $290 billion and improving household income. The researchers looked at scenarios that would reduce emissions by 80 percent below 1990 levels. “While addressing climate change is one of our greatest...

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THE PLAN TO SAVE THE WORLD

Nov 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] What success at the Paris climate conference looks like. —By Rebecca Leber   MOTHER JONES More than 300,000 computer-controlled mirrors gather light at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in Primm, Nevada Chris Carlson/AP This story originally appeared in the New Republic and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Right now, we’re in a car, hanging on for dear life as we hurtle around a mountain bend. If we don’t hit the brakes soon, we’re going to lose control, crash through the guardrail, and careen into the abyss. We’ve been fully warned about the danger ahead, but now here we are, testing our fate. Already, the effects of climate change are clear and significant. Last year was the hottest in recorded history, and it’s all but certain that 2015 will...

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ETHICAL DESIGN PRACTICES MAY HELP SLOW GENTRIFICATION...

Nov 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT   by Jared Green Gentrification replaces diversity with homogenized people and places. This process has “rippling social and cultural effects,” said Winifred Curran, a professor at DePaul University at the ASLA 2015 Annual Meeting in Chicago. There are many reasons why gentrification has been happening across American cities — and the process may prove nearly unstoppable — but there are ways landscape architects and other designers can ensure they don’t further contribute to the problem. Instead of creating “shiny new parks” that spur on redevelopment, they can work with existing communities to design public spaces that are “just green enough” and celebrate a community’s diversity. Landscape architecture firms can also create internal ethical policies to ensure they are supporting diversity rather than supplanting it through designed spaces produced in a fundamentally non-democratic way. The most damaging effect of gentrification is...

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MUJI’S TINY HOUSES SHOW OFF HUGE STYLE...

Nov 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander   LIFE EDITED Architecture Japanese retailer MUJI’s bread and butter is simple, neutral colored, no-frills household products, furniture and the occasional piece of clothing. As part of the “Tokyo Midtown DESIGN TOUCH” event, the company is dabbling in house design, showing off three tiny houses–MUJI Huts–that embody the brand’s stark but elegant aesthetic. The size and the lack of decor aren’t a function of laziness, but the company’s exploration into “what it means to live a more sustainable lifestyle through minimalism,” according to Inhabitat. The three prefabricated MUJI Huts were designed in partnership with leading designers Naoto Fukasawa, Jasper Morrison, and Konstantin Grcic, each of whom built their huts around a central material: wood, cork and aluminum, respectively. The idea behind the concept is to create an easily-moved tiny house that can...

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MOROCCO POISED TO BECOME A SOLAR SUPERPOWER WITH LAUNCH OF DESERT MEGA-PROJECT...

Nov 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] World’s largest concentrated solar power plant, powered by the Saharan sun, set to help renewables provide almost half the country’s energy by 2020 THE GUARDIAN Ouarzazate solar plant will create enough electricity to power a million homes once it is finished. Photograph: Graeme Robertson for the Guardian Arthur Neslen in Ouarzazate The Moroccan city of Ouarzazate is used to big productions. On the edge of the Sahara desert and the centre of the north African country’s “Ouallywood” film industry it has played host to big-budget location shots in Lawrence of Arabia, The Mummy, The Living Daylights and even Game of Thrones. Now the trading city, nicknamed the “door of the desert”, is the centre for another blockbuster – a complex of four linked solar mega-plants that, alongside hydro and wind, will help provide...

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TERRACE FARMING: AN INDIGENOUS MODEL FOR FOOD SECURITY...

Nov 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Marianela Jarroud, Inter Press Service | Report Terraces built by Atacameño Indians in the village of Caspana in Alto Loa, in the northern Chilean region of Antofagasta. This ageold farming technique represents an adaptation to the climate, and ensures the right to food of these Andes highlands people. (Photo: Marianela Jarroud / IPS) Caspana, Chile – Terrace farming as practiced from time immemorial by native peoples in the Andes mountains contributes to food security as a strategy of adaptation in an environment where the geography and other conditions make the production of nutritional foods a complex undertaking. This ancient prehispanic technique, still practiced in vast areas of the Andes highlands, including Chile, “is very important from the point of view of adaptation to the climate and the ecosystem,” said Fabiola Aránguiz. “By...

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U.N. PREDICTS THE IMPACT OF EXISTING GLOBAL CLIMATE PLEDGES...

Nov 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Clayton Aldern   GRIST Your sleepless nights of anticipation are about to end: The U.N. just released its report on the projected aggregate effects of countries’ intended nationally determined contributions (INDCs). Just us? In the event you haven’t been biting your nails to the extreme cuticular degree that we have over at Grist HQ, here’s the scoop. Since the end of February, countries around the globe have been submitting emissions reduction pledges — INDCs — to the U.N. in the run-up to the year end’s Paris climate negotiations. But countries’ INDCs are a bit of mixed bag. Everyone tends to use drastically different metrics for reporting their targets, which makes calculating the collective impact on global greenhouse gas emissions trickier than it should be. Luckily, the U.N. is up to the task. On Friday,...

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