HOW TO GET SOLAR PANELS ONTO MORE AFFORDABLE APARTMENT BUILDINGS...

May 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock A guest view By Laurie Mazur  GRIST This is a guest post from Laurie Mazur, editor for the Kresge Foundation/Island Press Urban Resilience Project. Solar power seems like the ultimate no-brainer. Free energy from the sun! And the cost of installing solar panels — like other renewables — has plummeted in recent years. Still, solar power has not yet penetrated one of the markets that needs it the most: affordable multifamily housing. That could change, thanks to the advent of solar photovoltaic systems with backup battery storage (solar + storage). A new report, “Closing the California Clean Energy Divide,” shows how solar + storage can overcome technical and financial problems that discourage owners of affordable apartments from embracing solar. Coauthored by the California Housing Partnership, Center for Sustainable Energy, and Clean Energy...

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MEET PROTERRA, THE NEXT GENERATION OF BUS...

May 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Proterra   “Everything that has an urban drive cycle will ultimately be an electric vehicle.” That’s what Ryan Popple, the president and CEO of Proterra, the leading U.S. electric bus company, explained to me in a recent interview. The future of transit isn’t cleaner diesel, hybrids, natural gas, or hydrogen fuel-cell buses, argues Popple. The rapidly dropping price for electric batteries combined with new fast-charging technology appears to render the competition obsolete. Right now, the biggest question isn’t which technology will win in the bus market — it’s how quickly all-electrics will take over, and whether Proterra can keep ahead of the Chinese competition, like electric vehicle giant BYD. Popple is focused on electrifying the transit market, which he expects “will be 100 percent electric” in a...

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What’s the True Cost of Fracking? This Eye-Opening Infographic May Surprise You...

May 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment There are significant pros and cons, making fracking a highly controversial issue. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet KERN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA – NOVEMBER 26, 2013: Pumpjacks extract oil from an oilfield in Kern County, CA. About 15 billion barrels of oil could be extracted using hydraulic fracturing in California. Photo Credit: Christopher Halloran / Shutterstock.com Arsenic. Cadmium. Chromium. Radon. Lead. These are just a few of the toxins used in hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking, a controversial drilling process to retrieve oil and natural gas from shale deposits under the surface of the Earth. Concerns about the process have been mounting, as studies have linked it to a host of environmental and public health problems, from increased infant mortality and low birth weight babies to the release of cancer-causing radioactive gas, contamination of drinking...

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DESIGN ADVOCACY AND MATERIAL SUSTAINABILITY...

May 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Dora Vanette   METROPOLIS MAGAZINE The Downtown Houston Childcare Center, designed by Kirksey Architecure with the goal of providing flexible learning spaces and utilizing natural materials and textures Photo by: Slyworks Photography Throughout 2015, Metropolis’s publisher and editor in chief, Susan S. Szenasy, led the Metropolis Think Tank series of conversations on the seismic cultural shifts reshaping our society and the importance of injecting a new humanism into design and architecture in order to better deal with emerging challenges. As part of these ongoing discussions, Szenasy engages key industry leaders and gives a voice to different knowledge groups that participate in these processes—from architecture firms and clients to researchers and consultants. On August 26, she talked with the principals of Houston-based Kirksey Architecture about architects as design advocates, master builders, and how material sustainability and building codes...

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RENEWABLES ARE LEAVING NATURAL GAS IN THE DUST THIS YEAR...

May 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Nati Harnik, AP   In the first three months of 2016, the U.S. grid added 18 megawatts of new natural gas generating capacity. It added a whopping 1,291 megawatts (MW) of new renewables. The renewables were primarily wind (707 MW) and solar (522 MW). We also added some biomass (33 MW) and hydropower (29 MW). The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) latest monthly “Energy Infrastructure Update” reports that no new capacity of coal, oil, or nuclear power were added in the first quarter of the year. So the U.S. electric grid added more than 70 times as much renewable energy capacity as natural gas capacity from January to March. Of course, generating capacity is often quite different from the amount of power generated, since fossil fuel...

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UNPLUGGING THE COLORADO RIVER

May 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Arizona-Utah border, as seen in the documentary “DamNation.” The efficiency of the dam has dwindled. Credit Ben Knight/Patagonia Could the end be near for one of the West’s biggest dams? By ABRAHM LUSTGARTEN CLIMATE PROGRESS/NYTIMES WEDGED between Arizona and Utah, less than 20 miles upriver from the Grand Canyon, a soaring concrete wall nearly the height of two football fields blocks the flow of the Colorado River. There, at Glen Canyon Dam, the river is turned back on itself, drowning more than 200 miles of plasma-red gorges and replacing the Colorado’s free-spirited rapids with an immense lake of flat, still water called Lake Powell, the nation’s second-largest reserve. When Glen Canyon Dam was built in the middle of the last century, giant dam projects promised to elevate...

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How the Sea Gets Its Smell—and Why It’s Important...

May 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment The ‘smell of the sea’ could play an important role in reducing the effects of climate change. By Ian Johnston / The Independent   VIA ALTERNET Beautiful blue sea, ocean, water and white puffy clouds. California Central Coast. Photo Credit: randy andy/Shutterstock Scientists have discovered just how the “smell of the sea” is produced by a tiny marine organism that is playing a major role in the fight against climate change. The microbes are so small that about half a million of them can be found in just a teaspoon of seawater. But they are also so numerous – they are among the most abundant forms of life – that they appear have a significant effect on the Earth’s climate. Writing in Nature Microbiology, scientists from the UK, US and China said that the microbe, called Pelagibacterales, were...

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NATION’S LARGEST GREEN WALL OF NATIVE PLANTS BREATHES LIFE IN SF MOMA...

May 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT View Slideshow The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) opened to incredible fanfare on Saturday, as thousands eagerly poured into the newly renovated museum that nearly tripled its gallery space after a three-year expansion project. While Snohetta’s new design and the museum’s dizzying amount of art—there are 19 inaugural exhibitions—will be the main draw to many, we have our eye on another museum addition: the SFMOMA Living Wall. Part art, part landscape architecture, the giant living wall designed by Habitat Horticulture is the nation’s largest public green wall of native plants that also boasts impressive eco-friendly elements. SFMOMA Living Wall by Habitat Horticulture, SFMOMA green wall, SFMOMA living wall, San Francisco green wall, nation’s biggest living wall, U.S. biggest public living wall The massive living wall stands...

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These U.S. Cities Are Best Prepared to Adapt to Climate Change...

May 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] While many municipalities have plans to cope with higher temperatures and rising sea levels, few have developed detailed strategies to implement them. By Padma Nagappan / TakePart  VIA ALTERNET Long exposure of the Baltimore Skyline and Inner Harbor Promenade, Baltimore, Maryland Photo Credit: Jon Bilous/Shutterstock Depending on where you live, climate change could lead to longer and hotter summers, heavier downpours, frequent flooding, and more intense wildfires. That has led scores of cities to develop strategies to adapt to climate change. A study just published in the journal Nature Climate Change found that such plans contained many good ideas for improving infrastructure, protecting ecosystems, and educating residents. But researchers concluded that many plans fall short on the details, such as how to prioritize the most urgent needs, estimating costs, securing funding to implement projects, and planning for uncertainties...

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THE HOUSE SCIENCE COMMITTEE HATES SCIENCE AND SHOULD BE DISBANDED...

May 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The House science committee has become a national embarrassment, and does more harm than good. Let’s get rid of it J.D. Trout   Lamar Smith (Credit: AP/Harry Hamburg) As if named by a Congressional Office of Dark Irony, The House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology really seems to hate science. Its current chair, Lamar Smith, R – Tex., is a climate change denier, seeing a conspiracy in the overwhelming scientific consensus on human-caused global warming, where the vast majority of experts in the world see only good science. In the last four or five Congressional sessions, the attacks on science made by the majority membership of HCSST have become increasingly unhinged and prolonged. Rather than acting on House Resolutions that advanced the aims of science, Lamar Smith assumed the role of small-government...

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SOLAR-POWERED HOTEL AT OBERLIN IS FIRST IN U.S. TO BE HEATED AND COOLED WITH GEOTHERMAL ENERGY...

May 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Cat DiStasio  INHABITAT View Slideshow The sleepy town of Oberlin, Ohio is primarily known for being home to an historic college of the same name, but its reputation may be refreshed by the addition of a new LEED-certified hotel. The Hotel at Oberlin, whose profits will establish scholarships for students of Oberlin College, celebrated its opening this month. The hotel has a host of sustainable features, ranging from solar power to geothermal heat, as well as reclaimed building materials and locally-sourced foods in the onsite restaurant, making it an environmental star in the heartland. In addition to 70 guest rooms and suites, the Hotel at Oberlin features a bar and restaurant serving locally-sourced foods. The hotel’s adjoined conference facility, the Peter B. Lewis Gateway Center, includes a 3,800-square-foot event space with state-of-the-art...

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WHY THE ECONOMY SHOULD STOP GROWING — AND JUST GROW UP...

May 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  Listen to the political candidates as they put forward their economic solutions. You will hear a well-established and rarely challenged narrative. “We must grow the economy to produce jobs so people will have the money to grow their consumption, which will grow more jobs…” Grow. Grow. Grow. But children and adolescents grow. Adults mature. It is time to reframe the debate to recognize that we have pushed growth in material consumption beyond Earth’s environmental limits. We must now shift our economic priority from growth to maturity — meeting the needs of all within the limits of what Earth can provide. Global GDP is currently growing 3 to 4 percent annually. Contrary to the promises of politicians and economists, this growth is not eliminating poverty and creating a better life for all. It is instead creating...

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WE CAN STOP SEARCHING FOR THE CLEAN ENERGY MIRACLE. IT’S ALREADY HERE....

May 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Justin Pritchard, AP   Key climate solutions have been advancing considerably faster than anyone expected just a few years ago thanks to aggressive market-based deployment efforts around the globe. These solutions include such core enabling technologies for a low-carbon world as solar, wind, efficiency, electric cars, and battery storage. That’s a key reason almost everything you know about climate change solutions is probably outdated. In Part 1 of this series, I discussed other reasons. For instance, climate science and climate politics have moved unexpectedly quickly toward a broad understanding that we need to keep total human-caused global warming as far as possible below 2°C (3.6°F) — and ideally to no more than 1.5°C. But the media and commentariat generally have not kept up with the science or...

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ONE BUILDING IS SAVING $1 MILLION A YEAR ON ENERGY. WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF THE WHOLE WORLD WAS MORE EFFICIENT?...

May 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Keith Srakocic The U.S. Steel Building in Pittsburgh saves more than a million dollars a year after retrofitting for better efficiency.   Amid all the talk about transitioning to clean energy sources, consider this: The cleanest energy is the energy we never use. It’s also the cheapest, which is one reason that companies are embracing energy efficiency now more than ever. In fact, energy efficiency — now being rebranded for the business sector as energy productivity — is having a moment. “People have been working on this topic for the last 20 to 30 years, but there still are so many opportunities that need to be unlocked,” Jenny Chu, a manager at The Climate Group, told ThinkProgress. Chu was speaking from the Alliance to Save Energy’s...

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E.O. WILSON CALLS FOR PRESERVING HALF OF THE EARTH...

May 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green Half Earth / Liveright In his latest book, Half-Earth: Our Planet’s Fight for Life, famed biologist and author E.O. Wilson makes the case for both preserving and restoring half of the Earth, which he believes is possible if we set aside some of the richest places of biodiversity on land and in the oceans. These arks can protect up to 85 percent of all current life as the planet’s human population continues to grow from the current 7 billion to an expected maximum of 11 billion in coming decades. He believes humans have a moral obligation to be stewards of the millions of species that also call the planet home. And if we do not undertake such an ambitious conservation effort now, there could be potentially massive negative...

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AMID DILMA ROUSSEFF’S IMPEACHMENT, BRAZIL PREPARES TO ROLL BACK ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS...

May 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Jan Rocha / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Damaging new roads and other projects are likely to be nodded through in Brazil. (Lucas Kenzo 436 via Wikimedia Commons) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. SÃO PAULO—Taking advantage of Brazil’s present political turbulence, as the battle to impeach President Dilma Rousseff reaches its climax, reactionary politicians are quietly rolling back environmental and indigenous protection laws in defiance of the country’s commitments under the Paris Agreement. Environmentalists say that if the bill known as PEC 65/2012, now at the Senate committee stage, is approved, it means that major infrastructure projects will be able to go ahead regardless of their impacts on biodiversity, indigenous areas, traditional communities and conservation areas. Instead of a careful if somewhat slow licensing process which...

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URBAN AGRICULTURE CAN’T FEED US, BUT THAT DOESN’T MEAN IT’S A BAD IDEA...

May 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Research shows that the social and cultural benefits of city farms and gardens far outweigh the number of people they can feed. Urban farm near low-income housing in Chicago. (Photo: Linda N./Flickr) Willy Blackmore is TakePart’s Food editor.   Growing up in Iowa is a good way to become familiar with what a field of corn looks like. My eye is more readily drawn to its shiny, lopping leaves and the spike of an unopened tassel than to most any other plant. Driving across Los Angeles, as I do far too often, the crop still catches my eye, but the plots that it grows on here look nothing like the rolling farms back home that each measure in the thousands of acres. Instead, it’s a small berm pushed up against a park fence...

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Leonardo DiCaprio Stands With Great Sioux Nation to Stop Dakota Access Pipeline (Video)...

May 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment The campaign to oppose the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) gains steam with DiCaprio and actors from the upcoming “Justice League” film joining the cause. By Lorraine Chow / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET BERLIN – FEBRUARY 13: Actor Leonardo DiCaprio attends ‘Shutter Island’ Premiere during day three of the 60th Berlin Film Festival at the Berlinale Palast on February 13, 2010 in Berlin, Germany Photo Credit: Denis Makarenko / Shutterstock.com The campaign to oppose the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) continues to gain steam with Leonardo DiCaprio and actors from the upcoming Justice League film joining the cause. Dakota Access—a subsidiary of Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners LP—has proposed a $3.7 billion, 1,168-mile pipeline that will transfer up to 570,00 barrels of crude oil per day from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota and Iowa into Illinois....

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DON’T LOOK NOW, BUT YOU EMIT TOO MUCH — HERE’S HOW TO STOP...

May 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Grist / Shutterstock Living By Ask Umbra on May 9, 2016 Q. Dear Umbra, It’s common knowledge that Americans consume significantly more than our fair share of the Earth’s natural resources. I realize that this is a complex question that does not have a precise answer, but what kind of steps would I need to take in order to bring my consumption more in line with the worldwide average? For instance, would one cross-country airline trip put my consumption of oil above that of the worldwide yearly per capita average? Pete M. San Leandro, Calif. A. Dearest Pete, I love the spin you’re putting on “keeping up with the Joneses.” Rather than trying to match the conspicuous consumption of your local compatriots, here you are hoping to bring your lifestyle more in line...

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THE 4TH LARGEST ECONOMY IN THE WORLD JUST GENERATED 90 PERCENT OF THE POWER IT NEEDS FROM RENEWABLE...

May 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Jeremy Deaton – Guest Contributor CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: shutterstock   On Sunday, for a brief, shining moment, renewable power output in Germany reached 90 percent of the country’s total electricity demand. That’s a big deal. On May 8th, at 11 a.m. local time, the total output of German solar, wind, hydropower, and biomass reached 55 gigawatts (GW), just short of the 58 GW consumed by every light bulb, washing machine, water heater and personal computer humming away on Sunday morning. See the graph below, courtesy Agora Energiewende, a German clean energy think tank. (It’s important to note that most likely, not all of that 55 GW could be used at the time it was generated due to system and grid limitations, but it’s still noteworthy that this quantity of power was produced.)...

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FLORIDA MAYORS RUSH TO PREPARE FOR RISING SEAS...

May 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Cindy Lerner and Carlos Gimenez are, in many ways, typical local politicians. Both are mayors, and both are intimately familiar with the trials and tribulations that their constituents face on a daily basis, from trash pickup to traffic. Both serve communities along the southeastern Florida coast — Gimenez is mayor of Miami-Dade County, the most populous county in Florida and the seventh-most populous county in the United States, while Lerner is mayor of the village of Pinecrest, a suburban village of about 18,000 residents located within Miami-Dade County. And yet both are in a unique position for a local leader: they both believe that climate change is occurring, and that the consequences will hit Florida residents hard. That puts them at odds with the...

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NATIVE COMMUNITIES STAND UP TO PROPOSED OIL PIPELINE: ‘THIS IS KEYSTONE 3’...

May 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Nati Harnik Pipes for the proposed Dakota Access oil pipeline, that would stretch from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to Patoka, Ill., are stacked Saturday, May 9, 2015, at a staging area in Worthing, S.D.   By some accounts, the Dakota Access oil pipeline seems like done deal. Iowa, the last state out of the four the pipeline would cut through to grant a permit, approved the pipeline in March, leaving the project with just one federal approval to gain. And the company in charge of the pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners, appears to not be waiting until that federal permit is granted: It’s already started construction on the 1,154-mile pipeline. But for the native tribes affected by the pipeline, the fight is far from...

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I Sailed Through the Northwest Passage and Saw Firsthand the Devastating Impact of Climate Change...

May 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   One thing is abundantly clear: Obama’s decision to open the Arctic to offshore drilling is simply unacceptable. By David Thoreson / Alaska Wilderness League   VIA  ALTERNET Sailing through an ice-free Northwest Passage, Canada Photo Credit: David Thoreson April marked the sixth anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon tragedy that occurred in the Gulf. We can’t let a similar tragedy happen in the Arctic. Yet, the Obama administration recently released its proposed 5-year plan for offshore leasing, and while the Atlantic has been given a pass from drilling, the Arctic is still open to potential future development. If we want to address climate change in a meaningful way we need to acknowledge that exposing new areas, especially sensitive areas like the Arctic, to potential fossil fuel development simply can’t happen. ADVERTISING In 2007, our 57’ sailboat,...

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WORLD BANK: THE WAY CLIMATE CHANGE IS REALLY GOING TO HURT US IS THROUGH WATER...

May 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Energy and Environment By Chris Mooney The dried-up riverbank of the Ganges is seen from a bridge in Allahabad, India, on May 3. Much of India is reeling from a heat wave and severe drought conditions that have decimated crops, killed livestock and left at least 330 million Indians without enough water for their daily needs. (Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP) This story has been updated. As India, the world’s second-most populous country, reels from an intense drought, the World Bank has released a new report finding that perhaps the most severe impact of a changing climate could be the effect on water supplies. The most startling finding? The report suggests that by 2050, an inadequate supply of water could knock down economic growth in some parts of the world a figure as high as...

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WHAT IS BIOMIMICRY, ANYWAY?

May 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Grist staff This article is published in partnership with: MCAD Let’s play a game. It’s called “Who made it?” and it goes like this: I’ll describe a series of objects, and you guess who made them. If you guess all of them correctly, there will be a special prize waiting for you at the end of this article. Ready? Let’s begin. First up: an autonomous flying machine that uses insects as fuel, navigates with sound, releases a rich fertilizer as its primary emission, and can fold up into a compact pod while not in flight. It’s also biodegradable. Was this lean green flying machine made by San Francisco-based drone startup WinnginIt, or is it just one in a long line of autonomous fliers that nature has been working on for millions of...

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DEAD ZONES DEVOUR OCEAN’S OXYGEN...

May 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     Extremes of heat deprive fish of the oxygen they need to survive near the ocean surface. (Naren Gunasekera via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Scientists in the US have identified a new hazard in a world in which the climates change and the oceans warm: measurable stretches of the seas could become sapped of oxygen. They say that parts of the southern Indian Ocean, the eastern tropical Pacific and the Atlantic are already less oxygen-rich because of global warming. And oxygen deprivation could become increasingly widespread across large regions of ocean between 2030 and 2040. Anyone who has ever kept a home aquarium knows that, in the summer, the fish in the tank are more likely to...

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HOW WILL WE FEED THE MEGACITIES OF THE FUTURE?...

May 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] More people are moving to urban areas, and making new connections with rural farmers will be necessary to feed them. Urban agriculture in the Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco. (Photo: Sergio Ruiz via SPUR/Flickr) Tove Danovich is a journalist based in New York City.   Urban farms may provide a delicious source of delicate salad greens, honey, and even the occasional eggs, but they’re a long way from feeding entire cities. As rural areas continue to house much of the world’s poor, the question of who feeds these dense, agriculture-scarce areas becomes even more important. Linking small or subsistence farmers to urban markets could provide a way out of poverty for them, as well as opportunities for developing better infrastructure, creating new jobs along the way. More people already live in urban areas...

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NUCLEAR WASTE LEAKING AT ‘AMERICAN FUKUSHIMA’ IN NORTHWEST U.S....

May 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Alexander Nazaryan NEWSWEEK U.S. Radioactive Material Washington The Hanford Nuclear Reservation sits on the plains of eastern Washington, where the state meets Oregon and Idaho. This is open country through which cars pass quickly on the way to the Pacific coast or, conversely, deeper into the heartland. The site is nearly 600 square miles in area and has been largely closed to the public for the past 70 years. Late last year, though, it became part of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park, which will allow visitors to tour B Reactor, where plutonium for one of the two atomic weapons dropped on Japan in World War II was produced. This was a hopeful turn for a place that, for four decades, stocked the American nuclear arsenal. A total of nine reactors operated at...

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THIS MASSIVE SEAGRASS DIE-OFF IS THE LATEST SIGN WE’RE FAILING TO PROTECT THE EVERGLADES...

May 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE WASHINGTON POST Energy and Environment By Chris Mooney A massive die off of vital seagrass threatens Florida Bay Play Video2:20 A massive die off of seagrass threatens a resource critically important to the ecology and economy of South Florida. (Photo by Angel Valentin) (Daron Taylor/The Washington Post) EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, Florida — The shallow coastal waters of Florida Bay are famed for their crystal clear views of thick green seagrass – part of the largest stretch of these grasses in the world. But since mid-2015, a massive 40,000-acre die off here has clouded waters and at times coated shores with floating dead grasses. The event, which has coincided with occasional fish kills, recalls a prior die-off from 1987 through the early 1990s, which spurred major momentum for the still incomplete task of...

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CLIMATE CHANGE IS DRIVING OCEAN OXYGEN LEVELS DOWN, AND THAT’S A BIG PROBLEM FOR MARINE ECOSYSTEMS...

Apr 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] BY KATIE VALENTINE – CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: shutterstock   Scientists know that climate change is slowly robbing the oceans of their oxygen, but historically, it’s been hard to differentiate oxygen loss that’s due to natural ocean cycles and warming-driven loss. Now, a new study predicts that within the next 15 to 25 years, warming-caused oxygen loss will be detectable across the worlds’ oceans. The study, published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles, used modelling to determine that, between 2030 and 2040, warming-caused oxygen loss will be severe enough — and data will be comprehensive enough — for scientists to see what parts of the ocean are being affected by human-caused deoxygenation. “Oxygen varies naturally in the ocean quite substantially,” Matthew Long, lead author of the study and scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research....

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