SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING THAT MAKES SENSE...

Jan 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture There was a time when American single family homes weren’t so absurdly large. In 1950, the average household had 3.83 people and the average new single family home was 983 sq ft, making for a pretty reasonable 291 sq ft per person. Compare that to 2014, when the average household had 2.54 people and the average new single family home was 2,690 sq ft, or 1059 sq ft per person. That’s a 360% increase in per capita housing size. Yikes! What’s worse is this continual embiggening of the American home has dwindled the options of modestly sized homes for those who want them. We frequently get notes from people who want to downsize, but say they are forced into homes larger than they want because there’s virtually nothing...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (JANUARY 1 – 15)...

Jan 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by J.R. Taylor Can a Professionally Designed Garden Add Value to Your Home? – The Huffington Post, 1/4/15 “This year marks the 300th anniversary of the birth of Capability Brown – the landscape architect renowned for designing over 170 country house estates and gardens during the 18th century. His elegant style of undulating parkland and serpentine lakes can still be seen at dozens of locations, including Blenheim Palace and Stowe.” See a Rooftop Garden in Brooklyn Inspired by the High Line – Architectural Digest, 1/6/15 “Few cities in the world have real estate as expensive as New York’s. For its millions of residents, the idea of certain amenities, such as a private garden—must be quickly abandoned. Yet one apartment building in Brooklyn’s trendy Dumbo neighborhood is creatively changing all of that.”...

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BIRDS ARE GOING EXTINCT: ENTIRE SPECIES ARE HANGING BY THEIR WINGTIPS....

Jan 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] SALON.COM Deforestation and the pet trade have ravaged avian populations, and the consequences for mankind could prove dire Gerardo Ceballos, Anne H. Ehrlich and Paul R. Ehrlich, Earth Island Journal A visit to the California Academy of Sciences, located in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, speaks volumes about the disaster that has befallen birds with the spread of humanity. A maze of narrow corridors in the scientific collections leads an explorer to the Ornithological Collection. There you will find a cabinet with a sign: “Extinct Birds.” If you look inside, you’ll experience a dreadful moment as you take in
the sight of specimens of species that no longer exist. Your eyes will move from the imperial woodpecker and the passenger pigeon to the Guadalupe Island petrel, among many others. Each is carefully preserved in...

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THERE IS NO PLANET B: WE’RE NOT COLONIZING THE MILKY WAY ANY TIME SOON...

Jan 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Jenny McCarthy arrives at the American Music Awards at the Microsoft Theater on Sunday, Nov. 22, 2015, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP) Forget what you saw in “Interstellar.” The odds of our successfully relocating to another planet are virtually nil Kim Stanley Robinson, Scientific American   There is no planet B: We’re not colonizing the Milky Way any time soon This article was originally published by Scientific American. The idea that humans will eventually travel to and inhabit other parts of our galaxy was well expressed by the early Russian rocket scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, who wrote, “Earth is humanity’s cradle, but you’re not meant to stay in your cradle forever.” Since then the idea has been a staple of science fiction, and thus become part of a consensus image of humanity’s...

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DISRUPTIONS ARE NEEDED TO ACHIEVE A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE...

Jan 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green “The Paris climate agreement didn’t create the commitments we need to limit global warming to a 2 degree Celsius increase,” said Laura Tuck, vice president for sustainable development at the World Bank at Transforming Transportation, a conference in Washington, D.C. “But it was an awesome achievement. All 190 countries — everybody — is in.” All countries are now focused on how to achieve a net-zero carbon world by 2050. For Andrew Steer, president of the World Resource Institute (WRI), the success of the Paris climate meeting, and the long-term movement towards the ambitious 2050 goals, signifies the “renaissance of moral imperative around the world.” Tuck and Steer called for undertaking “disruptive approaches” to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) from the transportation sector, which accounts for the second largest...

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WHY A REPUBLICAN CONGRESS MIGHT ACTUALLY BE THE END OF THE WORLD...

Jan 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Keystone XL may be dead for now, but it’s only one of several measures that would put the planet in grave danger Michael Klare, TomDispatch.com  VIA SALON.CO   The Keystone Oil Pipeline is pictured under construction in North Dakota (Credit: Reuters) This piece originally appeared on TomDispatch. Pop the champagne corks in Washington! It’s party time for Big Energy. In the wake of the midterm elections, Republican energy hawks are ascendant, having taken the Senate and House by storm. They are preparing to put pressure on a president already presiding over a largely drill-baby-drill administration to take the last constraints off the development of North American fossil fuel reserves. The new Republican majority is certain to push their agenda on a variety of key issues, including tax reform and immigration. None of their...

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WE’VE FINALLY FIGURED OUT HOW CLIMATE CHANGE WILL BENEFIT FUTURE GENERATIONS...

Jan 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Katie Herzog When we talk about climate change, everyone is always going on about “saving future generations.” Well, what about the generations of 102,000 A.D.? Turns out we’re doing them a great favor! According to a study published in the journal Nature, climate change may have postponed the next ice age by as much as 50,000 years. Bloomberg reports: [R]esearchers in Germany were able to use computer models to replicate the last eight glacial cycles and provide predictions on when the next might occur. The scientists found that even without further output of heat-trapping gases, the next ice age probably wouldn’t set in for another 50,000 years. That would make the current so-called inter-glacial period “unusually long,” according to the lead author, Andrey Ganopolski. “However, our study also shows that relatively moderate additional anthropogenic CO2-emissions...

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THE SEVEN CHARTS YOU NEED TO FATHOM CALIFORNIA’S WATER PROSPECTS...

Jan 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Nathanael Johnson   GRIST It’s finally raining in California — just when we’d begun to think that it would never rain again. But the state is deep in water debt. Traditionally, California has depended on snowmelt for about a third of its water. The recent storms have gotten California’s snowpack up to slightly above average for this time of year, but it’s going to take a lot more than that to refill reservoirs. First the good news: Snow! Compare the current snowpack (above) to this time last year. Why are we seeing more snow? Well, it got colder and wetter. Last year, average minimum temperature in the Sierra Nevada mountains was 32.1 degrees, which meant it just wasn’t cold enough to snow in most places. “Temperatures are getting warmer every year,” said Doug Carlson, an information officer...

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CATTLE GRAZING IS A CLIMATE DISASTER, AND YOU’RE PAYING FOR IT...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] REUTERS/Max Whittaker By Ben Adler GRIST The rules governing cattle grazing on federal lands are so obscure that your average climate change correspondent hasn’t given much thought to them. But now that a gang of pathetic losers with guns has occupied a federal wildlife sanctuary in Oregon to gripe about the federal government’s audacity to set rules for how ranchers use publicly owned land, it’s worth taking a look at this policy. As it turns out, ranchers using federal land, like the Bundy family that is leading the occupation and the Hammond family in whose name they took up arms, are recipients of massive federal subsidies for activities that exacerbate climate change and damage sensitive ecosystems. It’s time the taxpayers stopped indulging these whiny welfare queens and kicked them off the dole. Why this...

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NEW MAP SHOWS THE IMPACT OF SEA LEVEL RISE...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] New Map Shows the Impact of Sea Level Rise THE DIRT by Jared Green World leaders have begun to get serious about fighting climate change, but the incredible risk of a rising sea remains in this century and far into the future. According to Climate Central, a research organization, a 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) global temperature increase, which is our current path, could result in sea level rise that would submerge land where 470 – 760 million people now live. If the world’s governments actually meet the declared goal of the UN climate summit in Paris and reduce and draw down carbon emissions, keeping the world to a 2 °C warming (3.6 °F) temperature increase, 130 million would need to evacuate over coming decades. To understand how serious this could be, here’s some...

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BOOST YOUR SUSTAINABLE CITY AMBITIONS...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  THE DIRT BY JARED GREEN The American Architectural Foundation’s Sustainable Cities Design Academy (SCDA) is looking for innovative public-private partnerships with ambitious sustainable planning and design goals. Teams are encouraged to apply to participate in an intensive 2.5-day design workshop led by SCDA in Washington, D.C., August 3-5, 2016. Since 2009, SCDA has helped 55 project teams from 50 cities in the U.S. hone their sustainable plans and designs. Some recent highlights: Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania: In 2009, a team of planning officials and developers met to discuss how best to achieve their goal of urban, mixed-use development on the 1,000-acre former ship yard. The team sought guidance on “best practices in sustainable planning, design, and development, including strategies coordinated with the recently launched GreenPlan Philadelphia and LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED ND)...

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TO PRESERVE AND PROTECT: WORKING WITH ARBORISTS...

Jan 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View Johanna Phelps  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Tree 1199 post-construction and the newly planted landscape beyond, Governors Island, NYC. Image courtesy of Mathews Nielsen Our last post discussed the increasing formal integration of cyclists into streetscape design. Here we examine how arborists partner with landscape architects to ensure healthy environments for the trees that line our urban bike paths and enhance our public spaces. As landscape architects we love trees! Be they pre-existing or newly planted, trees are often the backbone to a site design. Mature, statuesque trees add invaluable character to a place and are often a site’s greatest asset or attraction. Take for instance the Queens Giant, a tulip tree located in Alley Park Pond in Queens; it’s an estimated 350-450 years old, possibly the oldest living thing in New York...

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SO YOU’RE A MINIMALIST. NOW WHAT?...

Jan 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander   LIFE EDITED Behavior Minimalism and tiny house living have really taken off as mainstream topics in the last several years. Marie Kondo’s book “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing” has become a cultural sensation and multi-year best seller. Our CEO Graham Hill’s NY Times Op-ed about living with less was one of that publication’s most read articles in 2013. And consider the numerous TV shows about tiny houses: Tiny House Nation, Tiny House Hunters, Tiny House Demolition and so forth. More than fascination with small spaces, people seem to be longing for the simplification needed to live in such small spaces. But here’s the thing about minimal living: after you’ve pared down and organized your stuff, after you’ve moved into an appropriately sized space,...

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6 CITIES DESIGNING FOR HEALTH

Jan 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   From Detroit to Edinburgh, these cities are helping residents live more healthful and equitable lives. Anna Clark YES MAGAZINE Houston Photo from Shutterstock. Restore the bayous for connection While long dependent on the oil and gas industry, Houston is increasingly investing in sustainability. The city’s $480 million Bayou Greenways Initiative, a massive public-private project, will connect 10 bayous and creeks across the city and its periphery. In the past, bayous were straightened out and paved over to control flooding. Now, Houston is bringing these low-lying rivers back to their natural life: slow, gleaming waterways full of fish and bordered by wildflowers, grasses, and native trees. The city is also adding 4,000 acres of new and equitably distributed green spaces that will improve water quality. And it’s providing an alternative to high-traffic streets...

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Breathing Fire: How ‘Dragon Water’ Could Help Power the Planet...

Jan 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The quest is on to develop new technology that can tap the intense heat deep below the Earth’s surface and supply the whole world with electricity. By Paul Brown / Climate News Network   VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: N.Minton/Shutterstock.com An ambitious project is being launched to drill deep into the Earth’s crust to harness super-heated “dragon water” that would generate massive quantities of renewable energy. Unlike traditional geo-thermal heat, which exploits hot rocks to produce steam for turbines, this project goes far deeper − to where the pressure and temperature are huge but the potential benefits are 10 times as great. There is an infinite amount of energy beneath the Earth’s crust. The problem is the technology to harness it. The European Union (EU) believes that deep drilling techniques developed by the oil industry...

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HEROIC FOOD FARM GIVES VETERANS A NEW MISSION AS FARMERS GROWING SUSTAINABLE FOOD...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] “To be a good farmer, you have to be really good at a lot of things,” says Leora Barish, founder of non-profit veteran farming organization Heroic Food. “What [people] don’t realize is that veterans are great for farms and farming and for our food supply because they have a work ethic like nobody’s business and they have the endurance and they have the mission drive and grit and everything else that are required to start a farm.” Barish started the Heroic Food Farm in the spring of 2015 as a vehicle for teaching and training military veterans in sustainable farming so that they can utilize their unique skills in a new way. Inhabitat recently visited the farm, located just outside of Hudson, NY, to find out more about its inspiring mission as the...

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GROWING POWER GROWS FISH, VEGGIES, AND COMMUNITY WITH AQUAPONIC FARM...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Greg Beach   INHABITAT Gardeners and farmers who live in colder climates are well aware of the limitations posed by a short growing season. But these challenges often yield outstanding innovative practices, such as those used by Growing Power in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Growing Power harnesses natural cycles to power a farm that produces over one million pounds of food every year. Because of its ultra efficient greenhouse system, Growing Power is able to continue its harvest even through the frigid Great Lakes winters. Will Allen, the founder of Growing Power, created an aquaponics system that captures energy produced by natural systems. The greenhouses are heated by indoor compost piles, which generate heat as they break down organic matter. These compost pile heaters are also an excellent source of fertile soil for growing high-quality vegetables...

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THERE’S A HUGE PROBLEM WITH THE NEW FOOD GUIDELINES THAT NO ONE IS TALKING ABOUT...

Jan 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] And it poses a big threat to health. —By Nick Stockton MOTHER JONES Climate change: It’s what’s for dinner. MaraZe/Shutterstock This story originally appeared in Wired and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Every five years, the government tries to tell Americans what to put in their bodies. Eat more vegetables. Dial back the fats. It’s all based on the best available science for leading a healthy life. But the best available science also has a lot to say about what those food choices do to the environment, and some researchers are peeved that new dietary recommendations released yesterday seem to utterly ignore that fact. Broadly, the 2016-2020 dietary recommendations aim for balance: More veggies, leaner meats, try some fish! Oh, and eat way less sugar, no more than...

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WITH TWICE THE PROTEIN AS QUINOA, THE PULSE MIGHT BE THE YEAR’S NEW HOT “SUPERFOOD”...

Jan 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Global Pulse Confederation Market in Makalle, Tigray, Ethiopia   Move over, quinoa, kale, and açaí– 2016’s newest superfood might come in a familiar package (or can). Pulses — the dried edible seeds of legume plants, which include things like lentils, dried peas, and beans — are hoping to get their moment in the spotlight, thanks in part to a United Nations campaign to make 2016 the International Year of Pulses. Pulses have twice the protein of quinoa and require just 1/10 the amount of water needed to produce beef. Pulses are already a well-known entity outside of the developed world — according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, pulses make up nearly 75 percent of the average diet in developing countries. Nutritionally, pulses are a...

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IT’S THE LITTLE THINGS THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE...

Jan 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander   LIFE EDITED Architecture A reader tipped us off to the east bay town of Albany, California, which, like its neighbor to the south, Berkeley, has become increasingly hospitable to accessory dwelling units (ADU’s), both as a way to increase density as well as creating an “aging in place” strategy; ADUs can let older, emptied nest adults inhabit small dwellings behind the big homes that they might have once used for their full houses. We found this nice example in Albany on Tiny House Listing of how one family, through the addition of an ADU, turned a fairly typical single family house into a mini compound that housed three generations. While ADUs are often used to house older generations, this particular one, at least initially, was used to house younger ones. The house owner...

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HERE’S NEW NEWS ABOUT PESTICIDES AND BEES...

Jan 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Nathanael Johnson Bees are struggling, and several environmental organizations want to try to help them out by banning neonicotinoid pesticides. Now the EPA has published an assessment showing that one particular neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid, hurts bees. If you know about the travails of bees, but you’re a normal person who doesn’t follow this stuff obsessively, you are probably thinking one of two things: 1. Wait, haven’t we known for years that neonics are killing bees? 2. Wait, I thought I heard that neonics weren’t the problem! Does this prove that they actually are? Each of these starting places is part right, but also part wrong — so let’s back up one step. Background First, it’s crucial to zero in on what “killing bees” means. There’s a lot of overheated rhetoric about honeybees going extinct; that’s just not happening. There’s also...

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DUPONT’S DEADLY DECEIT: THE DECADES LONG COVER-UP BEHIND THE “WORLD’S MOST SLIPPERY MATERIAL”...

Jan 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] For decades DuPont operated above the EPA and knowingly concealed the dangers of Teflon exposure Sharon Kelly, Earth Island Journal   Topics: Earth Island Journal, dupont, Teflon, Sustainability News, Working Ahead News, Social News, Business News, Life News, News, Politics News DuPont’s deadly deceit: The decades-long cover-up behind the “world’s most slippery material” This originally appeared on Earth Island Journal. Almost two decades ago, Carla Bartlett, a then 41-year -old West Virginia secretary and mother of two, was first diagnosed with cancer – what her surgeon later labeled a “garden variety” type of kidney cancer. “I was scared to death,” Bartlett, now 59, told an Ohio federal jury this fall during hearings in the first of more than 3,500 personal injury and wrongful death suits by West Virginia and Ohio residents against the...

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A WILD LIBERTY: THE SIXTH MASS EXTINCTION...

Jan 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Grant A. Mincy, Center for a Stateless Society | Op-Ed   (Photo: Deforestation via Shutterstock) The Sixth Mass Extinction Of all the complex, wicked problems addressed by the current environmental movement, perhaps the most urgent is the rarely discussed mass extinction. We are currently experiencing Earth’s sixth great mass extinction crisis — on par with the rate that ended the reign of the dinosaurs, thus terminating the Mesozoic. Stuart Pimm of Duke University, a recognized expert in the field of conservation biology, has published a landmark study in the peer-reviewed journal Science pertaining specifically to the causes of species decline. The number one culprit, by far, is habitat destruction. This is rather dangerous in regards to our surrounding ecology. Pimm’s publication describes the current plight of flora and fauna around the planet. Pimm notes...

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3 New Years Resolutions That Will End the World’s Dependency on Fossil Fuels...

Jan 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment The more renewable energy we use, the cheaper it gets. Fossil fuels get more expensive the more we burn them. So clean energy will win the affordability race. By Carl Pope / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: oatawa/Shutterstock 1. Take Delivery: Accelerate pre-2020 Compliance with Emission Reduction Pledges The Paris accord—by contrast with Rio and Kyoto—was a bottom-up exercise in open-source diplomacy. National governments largely were significantly influenced by the leadership of cities, the private sector and community and civic organizations. But it was still nations that agreed to the text. And the text, as massive commentary has groaned and complained, is not binding. (Neither, in any meaningful sense, were Rio and Kyoto. The U.S. violated Rio which it ratified, and Canada walked from Kyoto. No traffic tickets were issued). Renewable energy...

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GREENBUILD GOES MAINSTREAM

Dec 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] It may be more challenging than anyone has supposed for Greenbuild to penetrate popular consciousness. Susan S. Szenasy  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE MSNBC’s Mika Brzezinski interviews director James Cameron at this year’s Greenbuild conference. Courtesy Greenbuild International Conference & Expo In November, I boarded Amtrak to head to Washington, D.C. Our capital city, boasting more monuments than any other in the country, apparently inspires Greenbuild, the annual conference of the United States Greenbuilding Council (USGBC), to make some monumental announcements. Much has been accomplished in the organization’s 23 years of environmental advocacy. But it may be best known for its LEED-rating programs, which consider construction and planning at all scales, asking architects, builders, and developers to pay attention to, among other things, water, energy, and health—all that our home planet, and the living creatures that inhabit...

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SOUTH AFRICAN INSURANCE COMPANY BACKS TREE-PLANTING EFFORT TO REDUCE EFFECTS OF DROUGHT...

Dec 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Insurance companies are typically a fairly passive partner in disaster, showing up only when things have gone horribly wrong. The largest agricultural insurer in South Africa has broken the mold by backing a massive effort to slow the effects of drought, which threatens farmlands in the small country. Planting millions of trees has helped to reduce land degradation and ward off desertification, and the initiative could even lead to increased water supplies in communities that have lived under water restrictions for nearly a decade.  Rather than sit idly by and watch farmers lose untold acreage of croplands, Santam is working to actively reduce drought risk for its customers by funding Living Lands, an international nonprofit that has been active in South Africa since 2008. Working with government agencies, community organizations, and individual farmers,...

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SELF-SUSTAINING, RESILIENT COASTAL COMMUNITY NEAR BOSTON...

Dec 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Paul Lukez Architecture and team are designing a self-sustaining, resilient coastal community near Boston   by Cat DiStasio   INHABITAT The reality is clear: the global sea level is rising. Coastal cities are under threat of flooding during storms, and many areas are ill-equipped to sustain such an attack of nature. Increasingly, this is where technology and design converge, resulting in new approaches to city infrastructure and housing that is resilient enough to withstand or even benefit from the changing conditions. Paul Lukez Architects (PLA) brought together a multidisciplinary team to address this complex challenge in a Boston neighborhood which is surrounded by water on three sides, making it particularly vulnerable to the rising tides. Harnessing Energy from Rising Tides. In essence, the PLA-led team looked at the harsh reality of rising sea levels...

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DISASTER-PROOF SCHOOL DESIGN

Dec 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Lucy Wang   INHABITAT New York-based SHoP Architects has unveiled plans to build 50 solar-powered, disaster-proof schools in the Nepalese regions hit hardest by the April 25 earthquake. The design firm teamed up with nonprofits Kids of Kathmandu and Asian Friendship Network for the project, which will not only replace lost schools but also offer improved infrastructure that can work off-grid and even, in some cases, provide electricity and clean water to neighboring villages. SHoP Architects designed the schools to be as flexible and adaptable as possible to varying terrains and needs. The structures are made from an easily assembled kit of parts comprising readily available local materials such as earth brick, which provides stabilizing thermal mass. The earthquake-resistant schools will be set atop concrete slab foundations and erected with steel truss roof...

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BOTTLED AIR FROM CANADA IS SELLING LIKE CRAZY IN CHINA...

Dec 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Sadly, this isn’t a gag from “Silicon Valley.” Vitality Air is marketing itself to smog-filled Chinese cities AJ Dellinger, The Daily Dot   (Credit: Bob Richardson) This article originally appeared on The Daily Dot. If someone told you there is a Silicon Valley startup selling bottled air to China, you would probably think it’s a joke. And it is; the startup is actually in Alberta, Canada. Vitality Air produces and sells “hand-bottled” air from Banff and Lake Louise, two Canadian locales known for their Rocky Mountain surroundings and crystal clear bodies of water. ADVERTISING More from The Daily Dot: “Mall Santa helps with special moment for grieving family” The startup has been capturing that air in “massive cans” through a clean compression process, which according to Vitality Air, “lock[s] in the pure air...

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SEVEN REASONS 2015 WAS THE SWEETEST YEAR YET FOR SAVING BEES...

Dec 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Thanks to policy changes and pesticide bans, the dwindling bee population is finally getting some much-needed protection. (Photo: Flickr) Dec 15, 2015 Nicole Mormann is TakePart’s editorial fellow. She covers a variety of topics, including social justice, entertainment, lifestyle, and environment.   We may have run for the hills as kids if we saw a few bees buzzing nearby, but without them, we wouldn’t have been able to enjoy some important staple foods growing up: Apples, avocados, almonds, blueberries, cherries, and pumpkins—these are just a sampling of the many crops that rely on the pollination power of bees. Bees pollinate more than $15 billion worth of U.S. crops each year, and yet massive bee die-offs in recent years are costing the economy an estimated $5.7 billion annually, not to mention the possible loss...

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