TADAO ANDO’S 152 ELIZABETH STREET IN NEW YORK INCLUDES A MONUMENTAL GREEN WALL...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]       ‘152 elizabeth street’ is an ultra luxury condominium building located in new york’s nolita neighborhood. designed by acclaimed japanese architect tadao ando, the scheme measures 32,000-square feet and comprises a total of seven stories and seven residences. each dwelling has been designed as a bespoke custom home, individually configured to highlight craft, detail, and quality. the living green wall measures 55 feet by 99 feet (17 x 30 meters) image by noë & associates and the boundary       developed by sumaida + khurana, ando is collaborating on the project with michael gabellini, the architect of record who is also designing the building’s interiors. in addition to ando’s signature poured-in-place concrete, the scheme also features a living green wall measuring 55-feet-high and 99-feet-wide — one of the largest in...

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PENDA POSES GREEN-FILLED SKY VILLA RESIDENCES IN INDIA...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]         penda has shared the latest development for his magic breeze project in hyderabad / india with the proposal of a residential idea of a ‘house with a garden’ to complement the maze-like garden landscape. the 450,000 square foot development is composed of 127 units; designed as duplex sky villas with each unit divided from its neighbor by a double-height, private garden. these green ‘in-between spaces’ create a sense of openness and vitality to the compound and loosens up the density a tenant would experience in a common condominium building. the complex would be composed of residential 127 units       for the project, penda developed a modular planter system that would be installed as an extension for the balconies of each unit. each planter can be filled with...

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A SOLAR POWERED PLANE JUST CROSSED THE ATLANTIC...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Solar Impulse sunprecedented By Samantha Lee GRIST If you thought there was something solar power couldn’t do, think again, because the sun just carried an airplane across the Atlantic Ocean. Early Thursday morning, Swiss pilot Bertrand Piccard successfully landed the Solar Impulse 2 in Spain after a four-day journey that began in New York. All the while, the scrappy little plane, powered by 17,000 solar cells, emitted no pollution and guzzled no fuel. This flight was the latest leg in a round-the-world journey set to end in Abu Dhabi, and is particularly symbolic “because all the means of transportation have always tried to cross the Atlantic,” Piccard told the Guardian. With seating room for one, the Solar Impulse — which has a larger wingspan than a Boeing 747 but is lighter than a car...

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FOSSIL FUEL COMPANIES IMPOSE MORE IN CLIMATE COSTS THAN THEY MAKE IN PROFITS...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  by David Roberts   VOX (Shutterstock) It is fairly well understood by now that releasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere imposes an economic cost, in the form of climate change impacts. In most cases, however, those responsible for carbon emissions are not required to pay that cost. Instead, it’s borne mainly by the world’s poor and low-lying countries, and of course by future generations, as many of the worst impacts of climate change will emerge years after the emissions that drive them. People sometimes refer to the unpaid cost of carbon pollution as a subsidy, or an “implicit subsidy,” to polluting businesses. The IMF recently issued a report saying that total worldwide subsidies to energy, mainly fossil fuel energy, amounted to $5.2 trillion a year. The reason that number is...

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THE NEW LANDSCAPE DECLARATION: PERSPECTIVE AND CRITIQUE (PART 2)...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Dirt Contributo New Landscape Declaration / LAF The second day of the Landscape Architecture Foundation‘s New Landscape Declaration:  Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future offered critical responses to the 23 declarations delivered on the first day of the event and looked ahead to the next 50 years. Afternoon sessions were divided into five panels, each representing a different aspect of landscape architecture: academic practice, private practice, public practice, capacity building organizations, and emerging voices. Each panelist gave a short talk before engaging in a group discussion, addressing audience-sourced questions, and offering perspectives on what needs to be achieved over the next 50 years: Academic practice: Maintain the value of the “long view” “Academics combine teaching, scholarship, and service” while “taking the long view: looking back, then to now, and forward,” argued...

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THE NEW LANDSCAPE DECLARATION: PERSPECTIVE AND CRITIQUE (PART 1)...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT BY Jared Green New Landscape Declaration / LAF After hearing 23 declarations on the first day of the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF)‘s New Landscape Declaration: Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future, panels of landscape architects on day two critiqued the declarations, delved into some of the important facets of landscape architecture — aesthetics, ecology, society, and innovation — and offered visions for what needs to be achieved over the next 50 years. Aesthetics: Connect Through Creativity The panel, which was led by Adam Greenspan, ASLA, a member of the LAF board of directors, essentially worried that the importance of “physical design, which engages culture and nature,” may be lost in the total quest for sustainability and restoring ecosystems. Their response was designed landscapes must be beautiful if we expect communities...

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Why Conserving Crops’ Wild Cousins May Be Critical for Human Survival...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Food As global food requirements grow with a skyrocketing human population, genes from wild relatives of common crops could play a big role. By Kristen Satre Meyer / Ensia  VIA ALTERNET Portrait of a young woman at work in greenhouse,in uniform and clipboard in her hand . Greenhouse produce. Food production. Tomato growing in greenhouse. Photo Credit: Vlad Teodor/Shutterstock Wild cousins aren’t always appreciated at family gatherings. But when it comes to crops, the opposite is often true: Plant breeding has historically relied on genes from plants growing in the wild as a source of diversity that can be introduced into crop plants to produce new crop varieties that are more resilient, nutritious and productive than those currently cultivated. As human populations increase and shift away from traditional diets, demand for food is...

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THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO DUMPSTER DIVING...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Food How to seriously cut down on your monthly food bill. By Assya Barrette / Greenhighfive   VIA ALTERNET   Photo Credit: Wikipedia I first came into contact with dumpster diving when I volunteered with the organizationFood not Bombs (FNB),Toronto Chapter. Their objective is to recover food that would otherwise have been thrown away, and cook up delicious vegan meals for whomever wants some. Although a lot of the food they get is donated from bakeries and shops (who’d otherwise dump the food), they do dumpster diving to fill in the gaps. Recently, one of the members of the group held a dumpster diving tutorial in downtown Toronto. After I attended the tutorial, I went solo in my town, with huge success. This, coupled with the times I had gone with FNB in...

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FRACKING PRODUCES TONS OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE. WHAT SHOULD WE DO WITH IT?...

Jun 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Byproducts of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, create radioactive waste like the truckload shown here in West Virginia. BIll Hughes down in the dumps By Jie Jenny Zou   GRIST Cross-posted from Center for Public Integrity The Marcellus Shale has transformed the Appalachian Basin into an energy juggernaut. Even amid a recent drilling slowdown, regional daily production averages enough natural gas to power more than 200,000 U.S. homes for a year. But the rise of hydraulic fracturing over the past decade has created another boom: tons of radioactive materials experts call an “orphan” waste stream. No federal agency fully regulates oil and gas drilling byproducts — which include brine, sludge, rock, and soiled equipment — leaving tracking and handling to states that may be reluctant to alienate energy interests. “Nobody can say how much of...

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THE NEW LANDSCAPE DECLARATION: VISIONS FOR THE NEXT 50 YEARS...

Jun 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  BY  Jared Green India’s water crisis / National Geographic Over the next 50 years, landscape architects must coordinate their actions globally to fight climate change, help communities adapt to a changing world, bring artful and sustainable parks and open spaces to every community rich or poor, preserve cultural landscape heritage, and sustain all forms of life on Earth. These were the central messages that came out the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF)‘s New Landscape Declaration: Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future in Philadelphia, which was attended by over 700 landscape architects. The speakers used declarations and short idea-packed talks, and attendees used cards, polls, and an interactive question and commenting app to provide input into a new declaration — a vision to guide the efforts of landscape architects to 2066. As...

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COMMUNITY-SUPPORTED DEVELOPMENT: A FIRST STEP TO COMMUNITY SOLAR FOR ALL...

Jun 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE photo credit: Boardman Hill Solar Farm Communities are a critical actor in the global effort to combat climate change. More than 1,000 locally elected officials from around the world were present at the Paris Climate Conference talks. Their voices, representing distant communities, were widely recognized as drivers of the international agreement. In the United States, communities and governments continue to drive toward more sustainable, inclusive economies by leveraging local solar power—most recently, in the form of community-scale solar. A unique benefit of community-scale solar projects is their very community orientation, which enables “community-supported development.” This concept describes the range of activities that can be taken to reduce the cost of, and drive local interest in, community-scale solar. The communities taking action can include constituent- or community-based organizations, nonprofits, municipalities,...

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IT’S TIME TO PLAN FOR ELECTRIC VEHICLES ON THE GRID...

Jun 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE (RMI) New report identifies important best practices for utilities, regulators, and other stakeholders If you think electric vehicles are still a niche technology, think again. The International Energy Agency (IEA) estimates that more than 1 million electric vehicles (EVs) were on the road in 2015, including 400,000 in the United States. In order to limit global warming to 2°C or less, the agency says the world will need 150 million EVs by 2030 and 1 billion by 2050, implying a 21 percent compound annual growth rate from now until 2050. India is considering a state-financed plan that would let drivers buy EVs for zero money down, then pay for the vehicles out of gasoline savings. The plan aims to transition India’s entire fleet to electric vehicles by 2030. China is...

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U.S. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE JOINS ANTI-SOLAR CRUSADE...

Jun 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] REUTERS/Paul Hackett Throwing shade By Ben Adler GRIST The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is the latest conservative group to start spreading anti-solar messages. In an email sent to supporters on Wednesday, the chamber attacks net metering, a policy in place in many states that pays people with solar panels on their roofs for the electricity they feed into the grid. The group also posted a video on YouTube last week making its anti-net metering case. This is fairly new territory for the chamber, according to energy regulation experts. In its email, the group warns: “While your neighbor is receiving a credit (in the form of a reduced electricity bill) for putting excess energy back on the electricity grid, these outdated net metering policies overlook the costs to use, maintain, and update the grid....

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (JUNE 1 – 15)...

Jun 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  J.R. Taylor A towering waterfall appears to fall from midair into the Grand Canal at the Palace of Versailles / Dezeen The Forgotten Space Under this Sao Paulo Highway Will Become a Hanging Garden and Park – Co.Exist, 6/2/16 “When an elevated highway was built in the middle of downtown São Paulo in 1971, the city said it was attempting to improve traffic. Instead, congestion got worse. The two-mile stretch of road, called Minhocão (‘Big Worm’) is now one of the most polluted parts of a city where smog kills thousands of people a year.” DLANDstudio Launches Phase 1 Design for Rails-to-Trails QueensWay – The Architect’s Newspaper, 6/2/16 “After years of debate over what to do with the 60-year old abandoned Rockaway Long Island Railroad (LIRR), the coalition has been moving...

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A NEW KIND OF URBAN FARM IN DETROIT...

Jun 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT   Jared Green Penrose market garden / Jared Green In the Penrose neighborhood of Detroit, two landscape architects, partners in business and life, are testing out a new model: the market garden. While Detroit has acres of non-profit-run farms growing fresh fruit and vegetables that are then donated to communities, Ken Weikal, ASLA, and Beth Hagenbuch, ASLA, who run GrowTown, want to show the residents of this poor community in Detroit and elsewhere that anyone can apply an intensive, efficient farming method to one-third of an acre, grow high-value produce in all four seasons, and make $50,000 – $70,000 a year. But their market farm model is really just one component of a more ambitious plan they are leading in the community, with support from the Kresge Foundation, non-profits, affordable housing developers...

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Mark Ruffalo Urges President Obama to Keep Fossil Fuels in the Ground in Gripping New Documentary...

Jun 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   A new film introduces the president to the victims of the drilling and fracking boom. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet I recently attended a film screening of Dear President Obama, The Clean Energy Revolution Is Now, a new documentary narrated by actor and activist Mark Ruffalo about the impact of hydraulic fracturing across the United States. Fracking is a controversial drilling process to access oil and natural gas—primarily methane—trapped in underground shale deposits. While the fracking boom has created jobs and stimulated the economy, numerous studies have linked it to many environmental and health impacts. The evening was hosted by ABC Home in downtown Manhattan. The screening at a nearby AMC Theater was followed by a discussion with an energized crowd led by Ruffalo and director Jon Bowermaster at Deepak Homebase, a...

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SCIENTISTS CAPTURE CARBON BY TURNING CO2 EMISSIONS INTO STONE...

Jun 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     Carbon dioxide is a component of the steam rising from the Hellisheidi geothermal power plant in Iceland. (Hansueli Krapf via Wikimedia Commons) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Scientists in Iceland have concrete evidence that carbon capture and sequestration can be made to work. They have buried carbon dioxide in the rocks and watched it turn to stone. There is no guarantee that what works on a small scale at a geothermal plant in south-west Iceland could be practical or economical for the world’s giant fossil fuel power plants. But the study, backed by US partners and launched only in 2012, shows that one problem with carbon dioxide capture as a way of reducing the greenhouse effect can be...

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LARGEST NET-ZERO PLUS COMMERCIAL RETROFIT IN THE U.S. OPENS IN LOS ANGELES...

Jun 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] According to reports, commercial buildings in Los Angeles are expected to produce an increasing amount of carbon emissions at the fastest rate compared to all other typologies. They already account for around 65 percent of the city’s energy use. To combat the potential environmental impact, new construction standards in California will require all commercial structures to be built as net-zero buildings by 2030. Related: The Passive House Standard Will Now Recognize Net Zero and Energy Plus Buildings The NetZero Plus Electric Training Institute (NZP-ETI) retrofit will generate more energy than it will consume each year, thanks to its onsite, roof-mounted solar array. Excess energy will be stored in the building’s battery storage system and fed back into the electric grid system. The multi-million dollar retrofit cuts total energy consumption by 51 percent, and...

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LAST OIL COMPANY PULLS OUT OF ARCTIC OFFSHORE DRILLING EFFORTS IN CHUKCHI SEA...

Jun 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Ryan Koronowski CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock The Pacific Walrus calls the Chukchi and Bering Seas home.   It’s often hard to find good news when it comes to the world’s oceans. Overfishing, coral bleaching, dead zones, acidification, pollution, oil spills, melting sea ice, sea level rise, the odd Cold War-era Russian rocket crashing into Baffin Bay with some leftover toxic fuel in the tank: There are as many marine bad news stories as there used to be fish in the overfished sea. So on World Oceans Day a bit of positive news is a breath of fresh air — or gill-full of clean water. Repsol, a Spanish oil company which owned a significant portion of the drilling leases for Alaska’s Chukchi Sea, abandoned 55 of them last week and plans to drop...

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Noam Chomsky: The Doomsday Clock Is on the Verge of Striking 12...

Jun 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Nuclear weapons, climate change, and the prospects for survival. By Noam Chomsky / TomDispatch  VIA ALTERNET   Photo Credit: Flickr This piece originally appeared on TomDispatch. He hadn’t been in office three months when he went to Prague, capital of the Czech Republic, and delivered remarks on the world’s nuclear dilemma.  They proved to be of a sort that might normally have come from an antinuclear activist or someone in the then just-budding climate change movement, not the president of the United States.  While calling for the use of new forms of energy, Barack Obama spoke with rare presidential eloquence of the dangers of a planet in which nuclear weapons were spreading and of how that spread, if unchecked, would make their use “inevitable.”  He called for a “world without nuclear weapons”...

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THE UNSEEN SLAUGHTER UNDER THE SEA...

Jun 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Unseen Slaughter Under the Sea Ocean Defenders Alliance is on a mission to stop abandoned “ghost nets” from killing dolphins, sea turtles, and millions of other marine animals. Taylor Hill is an associate editor at TakePart covering environment and wildlife. LOS ANGELES—As we set off for our destination off the Southern California coast, Captain Rex Levi weaves Mr. Barker’s LegaSea, a 55-foot Chris Craft yacht, between the massive cargo ships plying Los Angeles Harbor. The dockworkers’ strike of the past winter is over but still reverberates at sea as the behemoths queue 35 deep, waiting their turn to offload cars, clothes, and other merchandise at the Port of Los Angeles. Mr. Barker’s LegaSea belongs to environmental group Ocean Defenders Alliance and is named for Bob Barker, the game-show host and animal rights...

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CHANGING SKYLINE: WHAT WESTERN ARCHITECTS CAN LEARN FROM AFRICA...

Jun 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Kéré created a demonstration project for the Perelman Building atrium. Brightly colored parachute cords are suspended from mosquito net By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic Francis Kéré had to travel long and far from his tiny farming village in Burkina Faso, an African nation that skirts the edge of the Sahara, before he ended up with a show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As a boy of 7, he was sent away to a larger town to attend school. Later, he made his way to Germany to study architecture. In 2001, he took his design skills back to his village and fashioned a modern school out of handmade mud bricks. That one-story structure may look like a simple little schoolhouse – albeit one with a rakishly tilted metal roof – but its...

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HOW ONE COUNTY TOOK ON ATLANTIC COAST PIPELINE — AND THE TRUE COST OF NATURAL GAS...

Jun 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Brad Horn   THE WASHINGTON POST Battling a pipeline View Photos In Virginia, one woman’s fight to save her land Glass Hollow Road is a stretch of black asphalt in Virginia’s rural Nelson County, just west of Charlottesville. Ringed by lush green mountains, it runs for a mile or two before being swallowed by the forest. It’s lined with an occasional house, an occasional cow, and nothing is optional about waving to an oncoming driver. A short way down the road is a little white, single-story house and a not-so-little white barn, along with a dozen rusty vehicles slowly becoming one with the earth. For this house, there have been two pivotal moments in recent memory. The first occurred in December 1977, when a 19-year-old Virginia native named Heidi Cochran first laid eyes...

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CO2 TURNED INTO STONE IN ICELAND IN CLIMATE CHANGE BREAKTHROUGH...

Jun 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE GUARDIAN Radical new technique promises a cheaper and more secure method of burying CO2 emissions underground instead of storing it as a gas Site close to the Hellisheidi geothermal powerplant, where CO2 was injected into volcanic rock. In two years it was almost completely mineralised. Photograph: Juerg Matter/Science Damian Carrington   Carbon dioxide has been pumped underground and turned rapidly into stone, demonstrating a radical new way to tackle climate change. The unique project promises a cheaper and more secure way of burying CO2 from fossil fuel burning underground, where it cannot warm the planet. Such carbon capture and storage (CCS) is thought to be essential to halting global warming, but existing projects store the CO2 as a gas and concerns about costs and potential leakage have halted some plans. The new...

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THE SECOND-LARGEST CITY IN THE U.S. IS ON THE VERGE OF BEING 100% RENEWABLE...

Jun 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock It takes a lot of energy to run all those lights. But could it all be green?   Los Angeles is a city born of Thomas Edison’s inventions. The movie camera, obviously, helped propel it to become the second-largest city in the United States, but the light bulb, too, is integral to the city’s heritage. Unlike many of the country’s older cities, Los Angeles barely knew a time without electricity. There is even a hip bar called The Edison paying homage to the city’s history in a former power plant in the heart of downtown. Cities have a very unique ability to be at once visionary and pragmatic Growing up alongside the car and electricity industries, Los Angeles has long been seen as one of the...

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CALIFORNIA’S PRIMARY HAS OILY FINGERS ALL OVER IT...

Jun 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TV Spot By Heather Smith   GRIST In the months leading up the California primary, all eyes have been focused on the Hillary vs. Bernie cage match. That’s too bad, because there’s another Democrat-on-Democrat struggle going on in the race for the California Assembly that’s full of suspense. It’s another episode in Big Oil’s ongoing fight to roll back the state’s ambitious climate laws. California has the most wide-ranging climate plan in the country. It’s also home to a Democratic party that rewrote its platform last February to call for an end to coal-fired electricity and to investment in “new fossil fuel infrastructure projects.” But the state remains one of America’s top oil producers and consumers, so it’s not surprising that the petroleum industry has spent a lot of money in statewide elections, aiming...

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THERE’S A MINI-EARTH IN ARIZONA THAT’S TEACHING US TO SAVE THE REAL ONE...

Jun 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Newsweek By Nina Burleigh  GRIST This story was originally published by Newsweek and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. As scientists model dire predictions of environmental disasters from human-caused climate change, and global political instability in our nuclear-tipped world revives the possibility of that Armageddon, the fantasy that we might someday be able to flee the wreckage and sustain ourselves on some ersatz Earth is increasingly appealing. Unfortunately, attempts to create a suitable substitute habitat have not yet succeeded. As far as anyone knows now, Earth, abused and getting more damaged thanks to our unsustainable habits, really is all we got. The urgency and poignancy of this fact was the subject of dozens of talks last month at an environmental summit for young leaders sponsored by One Young World,...

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RAINY U.K. GETS MORE POWER FROM SOLAR THAN COAL FOR THE FIRST TIME IN OVER A CENTURY...

Jun 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock Renewable sources such as solar, wind, and geothermal, produced more electricity for the UK in May 2016 than coal did.   As the world hits ever-increasing records for heat and CO2 concentrations, sometimes it’s good to look at the bright side. In May, for the first time ever, solar produced more electricity than coal in the United Kingdom. Shares of total U.K. electricity generation met by solar and coal during January to May 2016 (%). Sources: Sheffield Solar and Gridwatch. CREDIT: Carbon Brief During last month, coal generation fell to zero on several days — possibly the first time that has happened since the country introduced widespread electrification in the late 1800s, according to analysis from Carbon Brief, a U.K.-based energy tracker. This is not a...

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NORWAY, FIRST COUNTRY TO BAN DEFORESTATION...

Jun 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] KATIE POHLMAN OF ECOWATCH ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT (Photo: World Wildlife Fund)Article reprinted with permission from EcoWatch Norway has become the first country to ban deforestation. The Norwegian Parliament pledged May 26 that the government’s public procurement policy will be deforestation-free. Any product that contributes to deforestation will not be used in the Scandinavian country. The pledge was recommended by Norwegian Parliament’s Standing Committee on Energy and Environment as part of the Action Plan on Nature Diversity. Rainforest Foundation Norway was the main lobbying power behind this recommendation and has worked for years to bring the pledge to existence. “This is an important victory in the fight to protect the rainforest,” Nils Hermann Ranum, head of policy and campaign at Rainforest Foundation Norway said in a statement. “Over the last few years, a number...

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