ISLAND IN THE SUN: TESLA IS POWERING AN ENTIRE ISLAND WITH SOLAR ENERGY...

Nov 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Earth & Energy In Brief The island of Ta’u originally depended on diesel generators for electricity which, on average, consumed more than 100,000 gallons of fuel every year. Now, the island is powered by a 1.4-megawatt solar array, coupled with a six-megawatt hour energy storage system of 60 Tesla Powerpacks. Power combo With the Tesla and SolarCity merger finally closed, the two energy companies have another collaborative success to celebrate. Tesla announced the completion of the solar energy project on the island of Ta’u in American Samoa in a tweet this Tuesday, accompanied by a video of the site. The Ta’u microgrid — an energy system with distributed sources, in this case solar and battery — is powered by  a 1.4-megawatt solar array, coupled with a six-megawatt hour energy storage system of 60 Tesla Powerpacks....

read more

IS RENEWABLE ENERGY TRUMP-PROOF?...

Nov 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Is Renewable Energy Trump-Proof? Despite the president-elect’s vow to ramp up fossil fuel production, solar and wind advocates say the market—and many Republicans—favor clean energy. A wind farm in Sweetwater, Texas. (Photo: Orjan F. Ellingvag/Corbis via Getty Images) TAKE PART DAILY Erica Gies’ work has appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, Scientific American, The Economist, and other outlets. Bio Donald Trump’s rhetoric on the campaign trail was xenophobic, racist, and misogynistic, and now that he’s been elected president, many people in the crosshairs are afraid for their safety. But despite Trump’s negative comments about renewable energy—denying climate change, vowing to “save $100 billion that the United States is spending on climate policies,” dismissing wind and solar as uneconomic, and touting deregulation to ramp up oil, gas, and coal production—industry insiders say...

read more

LIFE DURING TRUMP: PROGRESS ON CLIMATE CHANGE WILL COME FROM THE BOTTOM UP...

Nov 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Essays By Edward Mazria We are facing two very different and defining moments in history: the ratification of the Paris Climate Agreement and the results of the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Should the U.S. government fail to honor or withdraw from the Paris Agreement, this will be completely inconsistent with our core values and professional and civic responsibilities. The U.S. and global architecture and planning community, along with our colleagues in the building sector and sub-national governments, will continue to lead the effort to implement the objectives contained in the Paris Agreement and drive progress toward an equitable, sustainable, resilient, and carbon-neutral built environment.” Edward Mazria, Founder and CEO, Architecture 2030   As many are left feeling fearful and uncertain in the wake of the 2016 U.S. presidential election, it is important to remember that...

read more

GREENSBURG, KANSAS OVERCAME ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER AND EMBRACED A GREEN FUTURE...

Nov 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] State and local sustainability efforts will be more important than ever. Greensburg, Kansas. CREDIT: City of Greensburg By Jeremy Deaton It’s been a rough week for climate hawks. President-elect Donald Trump is headed to the White House, where he promises to gut federal climate policy. In light of his ascent to power, green groups are looking to alternate venues for action — namely local and regional governments. California and New York have both doubled down on their carbon-cutting goals since Election Day. Portland mayor Charlie Hales said the federal government will not be “a block to the actions we are taking at the local level.” Climate advocates are working to bring more states and cities into the fold, and not just liberal strongholds like Portland and San Francisco. Climate action is a tough sell in some...

read more

MOROCCO LIGHTS THE WAY FOR AFRICA ON RENEWABLE ENERGY...

Nov 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] COP22 host leads by example in the fight against climate change with 52% green energy target by 2020 and Africa’s first city cycle hire scheme The Noor One concentrated solar power plant in Ouarzazate is one of the largest solar plants in the world. Photograph: Fadel Senna/AFP/Getty Images Global development is supported by About this content Celeste Hicks  THE GUARDIAN.COM As the host of this year’s COP22 climate change conference in Marrakech, Morocco has been keen to demonstrate its green credentials and make this COP the “African COP”. In the past year, Morocco has banned the use of plastic bags, launched new plans for extending the urban tram networks in Casablanca and Rabat, started the process of replacing its dirty old fleet of buses and taxis, launched Africa’s first city bicycle hire scheme,...

read more

ELON MUSK: TESLA SOLAR ROOF WILL LIKELY COST LESS THAN A NORMAL ROOF...

Nov 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] FUTURISM Getty Images In Brief On Thursday Elon Musk said that his company’s solar roof will likely cost less than a normal roof, including labor costs. SolarCity CEO Lyndon Rive said that the companies are aiming for 40 cents a Watt, which would put it in line with the competition. Tesla CEO Elon Musk said the solar roof that will be sold under a combined Tesla-SolarCity will likely cost less than a normal roof to install. Tesla and SolarCity shareholders voted in favor of the merger, a deal worth $2 billion, Thursday. In late October, Musk unveiled a new solar roof product to show his vision for a combined company with SolarCity, but did not provide specifics on how much it would cost. Musk with one of the solar roof shingles.Tesla On Thursday after the...

read more

OBAMA’S INTERIOR MAKES IT EASIER TO BUILD RENEWABLE ENERGY ON PUBLIC LAND IN TRUMP ERA...

Nov 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] interior design   GRIST Jim Choate   FLICKR.COM The Bureau of Land Management finalized a rule on Thursday that enables solar and wind development on public land in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The rule has been in the works since 2011, but the timing of the final announcement seems … intentional. Clearing the way for renewable development should push along the Climate Action Plan created by the Obama administration, which asked the Department of Interior to permit 20,000 megawatts of renewable energy by 2020. So far, the agency says its approved enough projects to produce 15,500 megawatts — enough to power about 5.1 million homes. But as Sammy Roth of the Desert Sun points out, those numbers are overstated, because projects have moved slowly or been canceled altogether. Just 31 of 60 are in construction or operation. Some environmentalists hope the finalized...

read more

TRUMP’S INFLUENCE ON THE FUTURE OF CLEAN ENERGY IS LESS CLEAR THAN YOU THINK...

Nov 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Michael Liebreich   THE GUARDIAN.COM The president-elect is a political novice whose energy plan doesn’t account for the economic reality of coal and renewable energy Trump’s election has small business advocates expecting changes in government policy on issues like health care and the environment. Photograph: Evan Vucci/AP   As the world struggles to absorb the implications of Donald Trump’s unexpected victory in the US general election, no one is facing the future with more trepidation than those working on clean energy, clean transportation, climate and the environment. Hillary Clinton had promised to build on Obama’s substantial progress in this area; now they worry that it may be reversed, and then some. What does the future hold, under a Trump government, and how worried should we be? Businesses have seen the light with solar energy...

read more

THE TOP FIVE MOST URGENT CLIMATE CHANGE STORIES THAT MAINSTREAM MEDIA SUPPRESSED IN ELECTION YEAR...

Nov 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Juan Cole / Informed Comment  VIA TRUTHDIG I used the word “suppressed” in the title quite deliberately. Corporate television media in the United States is colluding in a cover-up of the threat of climate change, and they have specifically blacked out the climate change issue with regard to this election. The guilty parties are Comcast (owner of NBC Universal, including MSNBC/ NBC.com), the Walt Disney Company (the owner of ABC), Viacom/ CBS, Time Warner (owner of CNN), and Twenty-First Century Fox (i.e. sleazy presslord Rupert Murdoch). These five media conglomerates run by Stephen B. Burke, Robert A. Iger,  Leslie Moonves, Jeff Zucker, and, well, Rupert Murdoch are trying to drown your grandchildren.  Please do drop them a line (contacts hyperlinked except Fox, which is a multi-billion-dollar trolling operation so why bother?)...

read more

ELECTRIC FLOORS COULD GENERATE RENEWABLE ENERGY FROM WALKING...

Oct 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Tim Radford / Climate News Network Chuck Coker / CC BY-ND 2.0 LONDON—US scientists have found a new way to generate energy at home: the tribo-electric floor. Tread on it and it will convert the kinetic energy of a footstep into a current of electricity. And it’s made from the waste wood pulp that already serves as cheap flooring throughout the world. Xudong Wang, an engineer and materials scientist, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and colleagues report in the journal Nano Energy that they have taken cellulose fibres from forest waste material and chemically treated them in a way that creates an electric charge when they come into contact with untreated wood pulp fibres. The result: a patented, tribo-electric nanogenerator floor covering that can harness the energy of any footfall, and turn it into...

read more

WORLD’S LARGEST PASSIVE HOUSE SETTLEMENT TOPS OFF IN GERMANY...

Oct 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT.COM View Slideshow The world’s largest passive house development just celebrated a topping out ceremony in a monumental step forward for sustainable architecture in Germany. Created by Frey Group, the energy-efficient Heidelberg Village is the epicenter of Bahnstadt, Heidelberg’s newest urban district where all buildings are designed to meet passive house standards. The new project is a “living community” emphasizing multigenerational living, access to green space, and a heterogenous neighborhood setup that encourages social interaction. Located on the land of a former old freight train terminal, the 116-hectare Bahnstadt celebrates sustainable architecture and diversity in its living, work, and cultural spaces all built to passive house standards for an ultra-low energy footprint. The 6,100-square-meter Heidelberg Village, located at the heart of Bahnstadt, encapsulates the urban development’s values with ecological...

read more

The world’s fourth-largest emitter ratifies Paris climate agreement Getting India on board is a huge deal for global climate action....

Oct 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Natasha Geiling   THINK PROGRESS   CREDIT: AP PHOTO/GURINDER OSAN, FILE On Sunday, October 2 — the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi — India formally ratified the Paris climate agreement, bringing the total number of countries that have officially joined the historic pact to 62, representing 51.89 percent of global emissions. That places the agreement on the brink of entering into force, as it requires 55 countries representing 55 percent of global emissions to ratify the treaty domestically before it officially kicks in. The European Union — whose 28 member states account for about 10 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions — has indicated it will ratify the agreement in a vote Tuesday, October 3, meaning the agreement could enter into force as early as November. “We are now on the verge of entry into force for the Paris Agreement at a pace...

read more

BUILDING A BETTER ‘BURB’: THE RACE TO DESIGN A SUSTAINABLE SUBURBIA IS ALSO MAKING THE SUBURBS KIND OF COOL...

Oct 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Ecological concerns have led to a long overdue look at the design of suburbs. The results could be revolutionary Diane Stopyra   SALON.COM Topics: Editor’s Picks, New Urbanism, suburban sprawl, suburbia, urban planning, Innovation News, Sustainability News Cite, New Mexico(Credit: Perkins+Will) Suburbia is an easy target. But its problems run deeper than disillusioned housewives waking up from their American dreams in cookie-cutter colonials. Suburban living is not environmentally sustainable — at least, not yet. But a new crop of designers, architects and urban planners is envisioning a world in which minivans, manicured lawns and mail carriers are replaced by autonomous cars — aka, suburbia 2.0. While cities conjure up images of smog clouds and smokestacks, studies show the carbon footprint of a typical suburban home is four times greater than that of an urban dwelling:  Larger households require more heating and cooling....

read more

BRILLIANT GRAPHIC SHOWS SURFACE AREA REQUIRED TO POWER CALIFORNIA WITH 100% RENEWABLES...

Sep 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Tafline Laylin  INHABITAT View Slideshow Cold hard science in the clean energy space has a wonderful way of debunking misinformation fueled by politics and corporate greed, and nobody does that better than the husband and wife team behind the Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI). Elizabeth and Monoian and Robert Ferry have dished up an illuminating new infographic which demonstrates how much surface area is required to transition California away from energy sources that jeopardize planetary health to 100 percent renewables; take a closer look after the jump. LAGI writes: “Starting in 2009 with the Surface Area Required to Power the World with Solar, we have been making the case that the renewable energy transition, while a huge undertaking, is not any more ambitious in scale than previous human endeavors, and that the...

read more

LESSONS FROM A CITY BUILT WITHOUT LIGHT SWITCHES AND WATER TAPS...

Sep 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The best way to future-proof cities is to let them innovate—and sometimes fail. Wind tower at Masdar Institute of Science and Technology in Masdar City, United Arab Emirates (left); Birmingham, England. (Photos: Iain Masterton/Getty Images; Loop Images/UIG via Getty Images) Sep 19, 2016 Katharine Gammon has written for Nature, Wired, Discover, and Popular Science. A new mom, she lives in Santa Monica.   For 2,000 residents living just outside Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, experiencing the city of the future is a kind of waking dream. Masdar City is designed to take advantage of renewable energy, with a goal of being the most sustainable city in the world. It doesn’t even have light switches or water taps. The 87,000 solar panels that power the city and the mostly recycled water running through its...

read more

WAVE POWER HAS FINALLY COME TO THE UNITED STATES...

Sep 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] GRIST Briefly Stuff that matters the motion of the ocean Shutterst Less than a mile off the shores of Hawaii, two buoys are hard at work, bobbing up and down as they turn energy from the ocean’s movement into electricity. That electricity travels ashore to Oahu’s power grid through an undersea cable. It’s a test project, producing only enough power for about a dozen households. But it’s the first successful wave-energy project in the United States so far (in the wake of an abandoned project off the Oregon coast), despite experiments that date all the way back to the 19th century. Though development lags decades behind wind and solar, wave power has huge potential. The U.S Department of Energy projects that waves off the U.S. coastline could power more than 200 million homes. But harvesting energy from...

read more

Signs That Wind Power Is Gaining Strength in the U.S. (Video)...

Sep 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Juan Cole TRUTHDIG The Iowa Utility Board has approved a $3 bn. MidAmerica wind farm project which will be the country’s largest, due to come on line in 2019, and which will generate enough electricity to power 800,000 homes! I looked this up, and there are only about 1.2 million households in Iowa!  This one project could power 2/3s of the state’s homes!  Of course, you still have commercial uses of power, and then the transportation sector includes 4.3 million registered vehicles, which are almost all fueled by carbon-emitting petroleum.  But still, you have to wonder if Iowa will be the first 100% green energy state.  (Iowa has the advantage of being a midwest wind corridor; some other areas of the country, like the Deep South, are much less well endowed...

read more

LOS ANGELES CITY COUNCIL BACKS PLANNING FOR 100 PERCENT RENEWABLE ENERGY...

Sep 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Samantha Page Climate Reporter at @ThinkProgress. Solar electrical panels are installed on the roof of a home in Glendale, CA. CREDIT: AP PHOTO/REED SAXON The Los Angeles City Council took a major step Friday toward making the city run on clean energy alone. The Council directed the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) to develop a plan for going 100 percent renewable, including looking at where, when, and how the city should allocate resources to achieve that goal. In the motion, Councilmembers Paul Krekorian and Mike Bonin wrote that “the city has an opportunity to re-create its utility in a way that recognizes the potential for a fossil-free future, demonstrates global leadership in its commitment to clean energy, and protects ratepayers from the increasing costs of carbon-based fuels.” It passed unanimously, 12–0,...

read more

WHAT WILL IT TAKE TO POWER 23 MILLION HOMES WITH OFFSHORE WIND?...

Sep 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Obama administration unveils a strategy to exploit a vast but untapped source of renewable energy. (Photo: AWEA) Taylor Hill is an associate editor at TakePart covering environment and wildlife.   For the first time, the United States government has outlined a strategy to tap an enormous source of renewable energy—offshore wind. How much? According to the report, titled The National Offshore Wind Strategy, as much as 86,000 megawatts of electricity could be generated by offshore wind by 2050—enough to power 23 million homes while reducing the country’s greenhouse gas emissions by 1.8 percent. Advertisement It won’t be easy. The plan envisions rows of giant turbines anchored off nearly every U.S. coastline within 30 years. So far, only one offshore project has made the leap from planning to construction—the Deepwater Wind project off...

read more

Giant paper boats use holographic photovoltaic cells to boost California coral growth...

Sep 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] 1 by Tafline Laylin  INHABITAT View Slideshow A team from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania envisions a bold new world where giant paper boats float off Santa Monica Pier, harnessing solar energy to revitalize California’s coastal ecology. Another finalist of LAGI 2016: Santa Monica, an international design competition that promotes renewable energy and public art, Paper Boats is designed to harness solar energy using concentrated photovoltaics (CPV), reflectors, and Holographic Planar Concentrator (HPC) technology. Unlike other energy and water-generating designs, this energy is redirected to accelerate coral growth. And if you are weary of designs that don’t yet exist, note that LAGI’s competition guidelines require all entries to be technologically and physically feasible. In this way, Paper Boats, The Pipe, and other LAGI designs symbolize potential applications of existing technology. “Throughout the years, over-hunting and over-fishing...

read more

The Tide Is Turning for a New Source of Green Energy...

Sep 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The first underwater turbines are connected to Scotland’s power grid. A tidal energy turbine is loaded onto a barge in Invergordon, Scotland. (Photo: Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images) Taylor Hill is an associate editor at TakePart covering environment and wildlife.   Two turbines installed off Scotland’s coast aren’t harnessing the country’s winds to generate power. Instead, these blades are spinning underwater, using an even more predictable renewable power source in the region—tides. The offshore array is the world’s first network of tidal turbines to deliver electricity to the power grid, according to Nova Innovation, the company behind the development. Advertisement That’s a big step for green power generation, as it shows commercial viability for a marine-based power source to create renewable energy. Unlike solar and wind power, where power production stops when the sun...

read more

Is blue the new green? Wave power could revolutionize the renewable-energy game...

Aug 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] There’s enough wave energy in the oceans to power the world, and scientists are finally close to harnessing it. Diane Stopyra   SALON.COM   A 30 MegaWatt “wave farm” of Pelamis Wave Energy Converters (Credit: Business Wire)   Unless you’re a surfer, a sailor or the owner of beachfront property during hurricane season, you probably don’t spend much time thinking about the power of waves. That may be changing soon. Like a large, slowly building swell miles from shore, the wave-power revolution has quietly and gradually gained momentum. And this month it began the crest: The Department of Energy announced it would allocate as much as $40 million in funding to develop of the nation’s first open-water wave-energy-testing facility in a location to be determined. When it comes to tapping the commercial viability of this renewable resource,...

read more

The First U.S. Offshore Wind Farm Is Complete...

Aug 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The 30-megawatt project is set to be operational in November. Deepwater Wind CEO Jeffery Grybowski stands on a boat during a media tour of Deepwater Wind’s project off Block Island, R.I., Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. Deepwater Wind’s $300 million five-turbine wind farm off Block Island is expected to be operational this fall. CREDIT: AP PHOTO/MICHAEL DWYER The country’s first offshore wind farm is complete and set to start putting electricity on the grid by November, the developer announced last week. The five-turbine, 30-megawatt Block Island Wind Farm — providing enough electricity to power roughly 18,000 homes for a year — is not going to overhaul the state’s electricity supply, but it is a powerful step forward for Rhode Island and for the country. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) photographs the first foundation jacket installed by Deepwater Wind in...

read more

TO GET TO NET ZERO, THINK BIGGER...

Aug 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Allison Hibbs ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE Guest Author The importance of implementing net zero at the district scale   The World Green Building Council (WGBC) just launched a revolutionary project calling for all buildings to reach net zero by 2050 in an action plan known as Advancing Net Zero. The announcement provides a shot in the arm to the net-zero design and construction industry at a global level, further increasing the impetus for governments, developers, and service providers to make ambitious net-zero commitments and action plans across the world. But it also requires the industry to confront a long-standing barrier—the assumption that net-zero buildings come at a significantly higher capital cost than business as usual. In fact, when approaching net-zero energy (NZE) at a district level and leveraging an integrative whole-systems design approach, the...

read more

U.K. Approves World’s Largest Wind Farm...

Aug 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] CREDIT: SHUTTERSTOCK The U.K. government on Tuesday approved phase two of the world’s largest wind farm, adding 300 turbines to a project 55 miles off England’s shore, in the North Sea. The Hornsea Two project will provide 1.8 gigawatts of generating power, in addition to the first phase’s 1.2 gigawatts. In all, the 3 gigawatts provided by Hornsea is enough to power 2.5 million average (U.S.) households. At that size, the combined project is roughly equivalent to a nuclear power plant. CREDIT: DONG ENERGY “Offshore wind is already on course to meet 10 percent of the U.K.’s electricity demand by 2020,” said Huub den Rooijen, Director of Energy, Minerals and Infrastructure at The Crown Estate, the government’s asset management firm. “Major developments of Hornsea Project Two’s scale will pave the way for its...

read more

Elon Musk’s new solar roofing plan isn’t so new after all...

Aug 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Dow Powerhouse shingle and ready to mingle By Heather Smith GRIST Now that Tesla’s buyout of Solar City is looking like a done deal, the man who turned boring electric cars into sexy hot rods wants to shake up the staid world of roofing. Tesla’s CEO Elon Musk has a vision of a new kind of roof made of solar panels, and he wants to sell it you. “It’s not something on the roof — it is the roof,” Musk told a group of Wall Street analysts during a call last week to discuss quarterly earnings. “Which is a quite difficult engineering challenge and not something that is available anywhere else.” The fact is, solar roofs have been around for more than a decade. Witness this news report, from three years ago: But...

read more

Oregon Finds Switching From Coal to Renewable Energy Is a Bargain...

Aug 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Replacing coal-fired electricity with ever-cheaper wind and solar power will raise utility rates just 0.1 percent by 2030. A solar array installed at a winery near McMinnville, Oregon. (Photo: George Rose/Getty Images) TAKE PART DAILY John R. Platt covers the environment, technology, philanthropy, and more for Scientific American, Conservation, Lion, and other publications.   Oregon may have a reputation for rainy weather, but the outlook for the renewable energy there is definitely sunny. Earlier this year the state passed legislation that requires utilities to stop generating electricity from coal by 2030. At the time, one of Oregon’s two main energy utilities, Pacific Power, predicted that the switch to renewables would come with a fairly high cost, hitting customers with a rate increase of 0.8 percent per year through 2030. That’s a cumulative increase...

read more

5 Inspiring Signs That Sustainability Is Gaining Traction in the U.S....

Aug 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Since the Paris Climate Agreement was signed in December, there have been several environment-related developments that provide some hope for the future. By Rosaly Byrd, Laurèn DeMates / Huffington Post   VIA ALTERNET Macro of a green leaf cut out in the shape of the United States of America. Photo Credit: Myotis/Shutterstock The first half of 2016 saw devastating events that have left many—including us—feeling pessimistic about the future of the U.S. and the world. However, since December 2015’s Paris Climate Agreement, there have been various environment-related developments that provide us with some hope that, at least in regard to making sure our world is liveable in the future, we are starting to move forward Here are five inspiring signs that sustainability is gaining traction in the United States. 1. All about renewables. The...

read more

Democratic Platform Calls For WWII-Scale Mobilization To Solve Climate Crisis...

Jul 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Mark Stehle/Invision for NRG/AP Images Micro-wind turbines and solar panels installed at Lincoln Financial Field generate renewable energy during NRG Home’s 2nd Annual Media Charity Flag Football Game in Philadelphia Wednesday, November 19, 2014.   This month, the full Democratic Platform Committee approved the strongest statement about the urgent need for climate action ever issued by a major party in this country. The platform makes for the starkest possible contrast with a party that just nominated Donald Trump — a man who has called climate change a hoax invented by and for the Chinese, who has denied basic reality such as the drought in California, and who has vowed to (try to) scuttle the unanimous agreement by the world’s nations in Paris to take whatever measures are...

read more

Did An Entire Region Of The U.S. Just Disincentivize Renewables? This Lawsuit Says Yes....

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock During the 2014 polar vortex, wind generation saved consumers $1 billion, according to industry estimates.   During the polar vortex of 2014, power companies struggled. There wasn’t enough natural gas power in the pipeline (pun intended), and prices skyrocketed. The shortage was expensive for homeowners — some saw their monthly bill go up five-fold from January to February — but for utilities, it was expensive, dangerous, and scary. No one wants to be on the hook for a bunch of families losing power in the middle of a -7°F night. Following the prolonged cold snap, PJM, the entity that oversees utilities in the Mid-Atlantic and parts of Appalachia and the Midwest, put a plan into action: It would help the local utilities ensure that power was...

read more