WHAT SHOULD YOU DO WITH YOUR FOOD SCRAPS?...

Nov 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock Waste watchers By Ask Umbra®  GRIST Tweet Q. Dear Umbra, When disposing of food waste, what’s better: putting it down the garbage disposal, or disposing of it in the solid waste stream? I know my water treatment plant incinerates solids, and my waste provider landfills its waste. Which uses less energy? Jake Worcester A. Dearest Jake, This is the kind of question we face multiple times every day, but I daresay it’s especially timely this season. Soon enough, we’ll all be poised over our collective sinks, scraping forks at the ready, wondering what to do with all those turkey carcasses, potato skins, and Aunt Mildred’s leftover brussels sprouts. Garbage disposal? Garbage? Feed it all to the dog? What’s a conscientious eater to do? You probably already know this, Jake, so at the...

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US MILITARY PLANS TO DUMP 20,000 TONS OF HEAVY METALS AND EXPLOSIVES INTO THE OCEANS...

Nov 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Dahr Jamail, Truthout | Report US Navy forces engage in maneuver training in the Philippine Sea, November 28, 2013. The massive amount of heavy metals and highly toxic compounds the Navy introduces into the environment will not be cleaned up by the Navy, nor will the Navy contribute to medical tests for people whose health may suffer. (Photo: Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ricardo R. Guzman / US Navy) The US Navy has been conducting war-game exercises in US waters for decades, and in the process, it has left behind tons of bombs, heavy metals, missiles, sonar buoys, high explosives and depleted uranium munitions that are extremely harmful to both humans and marine life. Truthout recently reported that the Navy has admitted to releasing chemicals into the oceans that are known...

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CONVICTED COAL BARON: ‘I AM AN AMERICAN POLITICAL PRISONER”...

Oct 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Kiley Kroh Senior Editor at ThinkProgress. Former Massey CEO Don Blankenship releases a 67-page booklet from federal prison. Don Blankenship. CREDIT: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster Don Blankenship, the former CEO of Massey Energy who is currently serving a one-year sentence in federal prison for conspiring to violate safety standards, is defending himself in the form of a 67-page booklet, “American Political Prisoner,” the Wall Street Journal reported. The 2010 explosion at Blankenship’s Upper Big Branch mine in West Virginia killed 29 people — the worst coal mining disaster in roughly 40 years — and Blankenship was found guilty of a misdemeanor for his “part in a dangerous conspiracy” to flout federal mine safety regulations, in the words of Judge Irene C. Berger. (Much to the dismay of prosecutors and some victims’ families, Blankenship was acquitted of three felony charges...

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Widespread Mercury Contamination Across Western North America, Study Finds...

Oct 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment It’s in the air, soil, sediment, plants, fish and wildlife. By Susan Kemp / U.S. Geological Survey   VIA ALTERNET   Red deer on the bank of azure lake. Rocky Mountains of Canada Photo Credit: kavram/Shutterstock An international team of scientists led by the U.S. Geological Survey, recently documented widespread mercury contamination in air, soil, sediment, plants, fish, and wildlife at various levels across western North America. They evaluated potential risk from mercury to human, fish, and wildlife health, and examined resource management activities that influence this risk. Wetland habitats, such as the Great Salt Lake wetlands, provide critical feeding areas for many fish and wildlife species. (image: Collin Eagles-Smith, USGS)Mercury is widespread in the environment, and under certain conditions poses a substantial threat to environmental health and natural resource conservation. We gathered...

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THE PATENT THAT COULD DESTROY MONSANTO AND CHANGE THE WORLD …...

Sep 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] ECOSNIPPETS.COM   If there’s anything you read – or share – let this be it. The content of this article has potential to radically shift the world in a variety of positive ways. And as Monsanto would love for this article to not go viral, all we can ask is that you share, share, share the information being presented so that it can reach as many people as possible. In 2006, a patent was granted to a man named Paul Stamets. Though Paul is the world’s leading mycologist, his patent has received very little attention and exposure. Why is that? Stated by executives in the pesticide industry, this patent represents “the most disruptive technology we have ever witnessed.” And when the executives say disruptive, they are referring to it being disruptive to the chemical...

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$90 Billion Whistleblower Suit Filed Against Four of America’s Largest Chemical Companies...

Sep 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment The companies are accused of selling billions of dollars worth of harmful isocyanate chemicals and intentionally concealing their dangers to consumers. By Lorraine Chow / EcoWatch   VIA ALTERNET Lake Jackson, Texas MAY 31, 2016: Dow Chemical company’s new Texas Innovation Center built in 2015. Photo Credit: Ric Frazier / Shutterstock.com Four of the country’s largest chemical companies have been accused of selling billions of dollars worth of harmful isocyanate chemicals but intentionally concealing their dangers to consumers and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) over the past several decades. BASF Corporation, Bayer Material Science LLC, Dow Chemical Company and Huntsman International LLC have been named in a False Claims Act (FCA) lawsuitbrought by New York law firm Kasowitz, Benson, Torres & Friedman LLP on behalf of the U.S. government. EcoWatch learned that the recently unsealed whistleblower...

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HOW BIG PHARMA’S INDUSTRIAL WASTE IS FUELING THE RISE IN SUPERBUGS WORLDWIDE...

Sep 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Madlen Davies, The Bureau of Investigative Journalism | Report Factories that produce antibiotics are releasing untreated waste fluid containing active ingredients into surrounding areas, leading to bacteria in the environment becoming resistant to the drugs. (Photo: Global Environment Facility / Flickr) Pharmaceutical companies are fuelling the rise of superbugs by manufacturing drugs in factories that leak industrial waste, says a new report which calls on them to radically improve their supply chains. Factories in China and India — where the majority of the world’s antibiotics are produced — are releasing untreated waste fluid containing active ingredients into surrounding areas, highlights the report by a coalition of environmental and public health organisations. Ingredients used in antibiotics get into the local soil and water systems, leading to bacteria in the environment becoming resistant to...

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Army Corp Of Engineers Approves Yet Another ILLEGAL Pipeline Through Endangered Ecosystems...

Sep 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  by Jafari Tishomingo  COUNTER CURRENT NEWS.COM   The U.S Army Corp of Engineers has OK’d the final permits for the Sabal Trail, a pipeline that traverses trough environmentally sensitive parts of north central Florida. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimated that some 1,200 acres would be destroyed or impacted during construction. Later, the agency changed that projection to less than 900 acres.Then the EPA changed their minds again and dropped significant environmental concerns over the project that included whether the potential for sinkholes and damage to the aquifer had been downplayed by Sabal Trail and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. In some cases, the EPA claimed impacts to wetlands are considered temporary and by temporary meaning it could only 50 years to revegetate. The complete Sabal Trail project will be a $3.2 billion,...

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24 States Are Suing Federal Govt to Stop Clean Power Plan—Even Though Majority of Their Voters Want It...

Sep 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment The Clean Power Plan seeks to reduce greenhouse gases from power plants two to three percent a year. By Rich Robinson / AlterNet Big pollution in polish coal power plant. Photo Credit: Doin Oakenhelm/Shutterstock As litigators prepare oral arguments for the 24-state suit to stop the federal government from implementing the Clean Power Plan (CPP), a Citizen Cabinet survey finds that two-thirds of registered voters in the states party to the suit (67 percent) actually favor the Plan. Eight states were also surveyed, including three are party to the lawsuit; in all three – Florida, Ohio, and Texas – two-thirds or more also support the plan. In Oklahoma, which filed a lawsuit independently from the multi-state case, 68 percent of registered voters also favor the plan. Across the country as a whole,...

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Contamination Threatens One of the World’s Biggest Freshwater Supplies...

Aug 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Scientists find high salt and arsenic concentrations in an aquifer that 750 million people rely on for drinking water and irrigation. This dry-season rice crop in northwest Bangladesh’s Barind region was irrigated using water pumped from wells that sink almost 250 feet deep into the Bengal Aquifer System, which is in South Asia’s Indo-Gangetic Basin. (Photo: WG Burgess) Emily J. Gertz is an associate editor for environment and wildlife at TakePart.   Three-quarters of a billion people across four South Asian nations rely on one vast water basin for much of their irrigation and drinking water. Called the Indo-Gangetic Basin, it stretches east to west over 618 million acres, sitting like a cap over the Indian subcontinent, and contains about 7,200 cubic miles of groundwater, roughly 20 times the annual...

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Watch the Film That Reveals the Pollution Crisis You Didn’t See at the Rio Olympics...

Aug 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] ‘The Discarded’ director Annie Costner talks about telling the stories of Rio residents fighting to clean up an environmental disaster in Guanabara Bay. Trash floats in Guanabara Bay, site of sailing events for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo: Matthew Stockman/Getty Images) Aug 16, 2016 Todd Woody is TakePart’s editorial director, environment.   With the Summer Olympics under way in Rio de Janeiro, the global media has focused on athletes’ fears about the horrific pollution of Guanabara Bay, the arena for swimming, sailing, rowing, and windsurfing competitions. Filmmakers Annie Costner and Adrienne Hall wanted to tell a different story—one about the impact on Cariocas, as Rio’s residents are called, of the untold tons of untreated sewage and garbage that pour into the bay, litter its shores, and clog its tributaries. Their 18-minute documentary,...

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Prenatal Pesticide Exposure Linked to Lower IQs in New Study...

Aug 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Expectant mothers living near agricultural lands where organophosphate pesticides were used gave birth to children with lower IQ. Beyond Pesticides   farmer spraying pesticide in the rice field Photo Credit: Narong Jongsirikul/Shutterstock A new study finds lower IQ (intelligence quotient) in children born to mothers who during their pregnancy were living in close proximity to chemical-intensive agricultural lands where organophosphate pesticides were used. This study adds to the body of scientific literature that links prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides with lower IQ’s in children. Organophosphate pesticides, a relatively older generation of highly neurotoxic pesticides still widely used on farms in California, have been associated with a broad range of diseases in both children and adults.  This latest study supports health and environmental advocates’ call to eliminate these toxic pesticides in agriculture and move toward safer, sustainable, and organic management...

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UNITED STATES MAP OF POISONED PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS...

Aug 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Community New York Rev. Billy & The Stop Shopping Choir, Organizer Our map will expose 100,000 toxic sites where Monsanto’s Roundup and Glyphosate are sprayed in parks, playgrounds and public spaces. Over 13.42 billion pounds of Glyphosate have been sprayed on our planet in the past decade. Glyphosate use has risen exponentially since the introduction of genetically modified crops.   The EPA is holding a public hearing on glyphosate on October 18th. We want to present our map as evidence. Scientific studies show that Glyphosate is carcinogenic and toxic. Glyphosate is persistent in our blood, bodies, soil and water. It is in our breast milk and most organic foods. It is ubiquitous. Glyphosate has been linked to non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, birth defects, celiac disease, allergies and asthma.   It only costs one dollar to reveal one public place that has...

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NOW RESIDENTS OF THE U.S.’S SECOND LARGEST PIG PRODUCING STATE CAN SEE WHERE THE WASTE FLOWS...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Emery Dalesio Manure is sprayed on a North Carolina field.   Livestock farming — especially hog and poultry farming — is big business in North Carolina. The country’s second-largest pig producer and third-largest chicken producer, North Carolina has thousands of farming operations clustered throughout the state. And while those farms produce billions of dollars in economic revenue, they also produce something far more sinister: millions of tons of animal waste that can make its way into the air or water, polluting nearby communities and watersheds. In an effort to help spotlight the issue of animal farming and waste disposal in North Carolina, Waterkeeper Alliance and the Environmental Working Group have teamed up to release a first-of-its-kind mapping project, detailing exactly where North Carolina’s hog and poultry...

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THE NUMBER ONE THING WE CAN DO TO PROTECT EARTH’S OCEANS...

May 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Strict agreements and governance over our bodies of water is the only way to conserve them for years to come. By Liza Gross  BILL MOYERS  & CO. Scientists know how to cure many of the ills plaguing ocean waters farther than 200 nautical miles from shore, beyond the jurisdiction of nations. Restricting fishing, shipping and deep seabed mining in biodiversity hot spots would go a long way toward restoring ocean health, they say. (Photo by Stephen Coates/AFP/Getty Images) This post originally appeared at Ensia.com. When New England fishers complained of working harder and harder to catch fewer and fewer fish, Spencer Baird assembled a scientific team to investigate. Though a fishery failure would once have seemed inconceivable, Baird wrote in his report, “an alarming decrease of the shore fisheries has been thoroughly...

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THE WORLD’S LARGEST CRUISE SHIP AND ITS SUPERSIZED POLLUTION PROBLEM...

May 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE GUARDIAN As Harmony of the Seas sets sail from Southampton docks on Sunday she will leave behind a trail of pollution – a toxic problem that is growing as the cruise industry and its ships get ever bigger At full power the Harmony of the Seas’ two 16-cylinder engines would each burn 1,377 US gallons an hour of some of the most polluting diesel fuel in the world. Photograph: Peter Nicholls/Reuters John Vidal   When the gargantuan Harmony of the Seas slips out of Southampton docks on Sunday afternoon on its first commercial voyage, the 16-deck-high floating city will switch off its auxiliary engines, fire up its three giant diesels and head to the open sea. But while the 6,780 passengers and 2,100 crew on the largest cruise ship in the world...

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LONG BEACH FILES LAWSUIT AGAINST MONSANTO...

May 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TRUTHDIG posted by emma niles   The Port of Long Beach. (via Flickr) Following the lead of six other West Coast cities, the city of Long Beach on Thursday filed paperwork to sue Monsanto, alleging that the agrochemical giant is responsible for chemical contamination of its water sources, including the Port of Long Beach. The Long Beach Post reports: According to the complaint, PCBs find their way to Long Beach waters when they leach, leak, off-gas and escape their intended applications, causing runoff during naturally occurring storm and rain events, after being released into the environment. … The city said it continues to “incur significant costs related to PCBs in its storm water and the sedimentary deposits in the Port of Long Beach and adjacent ocean floor areas,” according to a release. In...

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Can Entrepreneurship Save the Planet?...

May 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Watch a clip of the new documentary ‘Time to Choose’ from Oscar-winning filmmaker Charles Ferguson. By Alexandra Rosenmann / AlterNet Photo Credit: Falco Ink. Climate change is the greatest crisis that humanity faces, and an opportunity to implement radical changes in infrastructure. Academy Award-winning documentary director Charles Ferguson’s new film TIME TO CHOOSE captures the scope of global innovation in response to climate change. In our journey to create a sustainable future and world for the better, Ferguson investigates the steps we can take to stop the global threat. The films’ scope across five continents, investigates the costs of fossil fuels and industrialized agriculture – and their drivers. From the poisoned waters of Appalachia, dangerous coal pits of China, deforestation in Indonesia the red night skies of Nigeria’s gas lands, the effects of...

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SCIENTISTS JUST PINPOINTED ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF FRACKING’S ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT...

May 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: BILL DICKINSON/FLICKR View of the New River bridge in Fayette County, West Virginia. Wolf Creek, a tributary of the New River, has traces of fracking waste chemicals that are affecting the local ecosystem, according to a new study. Researchers discovered the chemicals near a fracking fluid waste site. The New River is a local water source.   A dumping site for fracking fluids long suspected to be leaching into Wolf Creek, a West Virginia waterway with ties to a county’s water supply, has indeed contaminated the creek with multiple chemicals, a new U.S. Geological Survey study has found. The “study demonstrates definitively that the stream is being impacted by [unconventional oil and gas extraction] wastewaters,” Denise Akob, USGS scientist and lead author of the study,...

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DERAILED IN D.C.: “BOMB TRAINS,” POISON TRACKS AND MY CHEMICAL EXPOSURE...

May 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Richard Eskow  AMERICANS FOR A SAFE FUTURE A CSX freight train derailed in Washington, D.C. last week. The Washington Post reported that ethanol, which is colorless and highly flammable, was leaking out of one of the overturned cars in the accident’s immediate aftermath. The 14-car derailment also “spilled half the liquid contents of a 15,500-gallon tanker” filled with a sodium hydroxide onto the ground beside the Rhode Island Avenue Metro Station. That’s nearly 8,000 gallons of something the Post describes as a “highly caustic chemical.” Sodium hydroxide is also known as “lye.” If that name sounds more familiar, perhaps it’s because killers often use it to dissolve their victims’ bodies on TV crime shows. It has also been used by a host of real-life murderers, including Mexican drug cartel assassins and the...

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PREVENTING THE NEXT FLINT WITH TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN MAKE AT HOME...

Apr 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] How do we know the water flowing from our taps is safe and free from contaminants? For the most part, we trust that regulators and inspectors have done their jobs, and we likely don’t think about it much. We just fill our glasses, take our showers, and brush our toddlers’ teeth. But then Flint happens, or the 2014 Elk River spill in West Virginia that left 300,000 people in nine counties without water for weeks. In West Virginia, a group of students, ecologists, and public radio journalists have hatched a DIY pilot project they hope will keep another Flint or Elk River from happening. They placed six simple, low-cost sensors—developed by Public Lab and the MIT Media Lab—in the Monongahela River to show that ordinary citizens can collect and interpret water-quality data in...

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Fracking a Possible Cause of Disturbing Birth Defects and Deaths Found in Horses...

Apr 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Research has linked the presence of the byproducts of hydraulic fracturing to numerous animal deaths and stillbirths. By Lorraine Berry / Raw Story Photo Credit: Screenshot/Ithaca Journal In New York’s Southern Tier, local newspapers are investigating the connection between a local racetrack owner’s sick foals and the fracking fluids present on his farmland. The Ithaca Journal featured a report by Tom Wilber in which he investigated the ongoing issue with foals being born without the ability to swallow — seventeen of them so far — on the breeding farm of Jeff Gural, owner of the Tioga Downs, Meadowlands Racetrack, and Vernon Downs. The foals have survived, although all of them have had to be transported to Cornell’s School of Veterinary Medicine, located fifty miles north in Ithaca, New York. An earlier study by Cornell professor Robert Oswald...

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‘Catastrophic Leak’ Found at Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington State...

Apr 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment “This is probably the biggest event to ever happen in tank farm history.” The Watchers Radioactive waste ; Chemist in protective suit the disposal of radioactive waste Photo Credit: overcrew/Shutterstock The amount of radioactive waste that has been leaking between the two walls of one of the underground tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State for several years grew dramatically on Sunday, April 17, with up to 13,000 liters (3,500 gallons) of new waste. The leak occurred at the double-shell storage known as AY-102, which has been leaking small amounts of nuclear waste since 2011. It is estimated that about 265 liters (70 gallons) of waste leaked from the tank in recent years. Although it’s unclear exactly how much waste spilled out over the weekend, estimates place the amount at somewhere between 11,300...

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JUST MONTHS AFTER THE LARGEST NATURAL GAS LEAK IN U.S. HISTORY, PORTER RANCH IS HIT WITH ANOTHER LEAK...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Brian Melley This photo taken Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2016 shows a neighborhood in the Porter Ranch section of Los Angeles where residents have moved out because of a natural gas leak from a Southern California Gas Co. storage facility. Porter Ranch already experienced the largest recorded natural gas leak in U.S. history over the winter, when a leak at the Aliso Canyon Storage Facility spewed more than 97,000 metric tons of methane into the atmosphere. Thousands of families were evacuated during the nearly four-month long leak, which was sealed in February. Over the weekend, the neighborhood was hit with another natural gas leak. “This is horrible,” Porter Ranch resident Gabriel Khanlian told ThinkProgress. “This issue is not over with in any way.” Residents had been complaining...

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AS FRACKING CHEMICALS REACH A CREEK COMPANIES FIGHT AGAINST A FRACKING WASTE BAN...

Apr 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] CREDIT: Bill Dickinson/Flickr View of the New River bridge in Fayette County, West Virginia. A tributary of the New River has traces of endocrine disrupting chemicals associated with fracking, according to a new study. Researchers discovered the chemicals near a fracking fluid waste site. The New River is a local water source.   The smell of gas surrounding the northern streets of Lochgelly, West Virginia, was so pungent that Brad Keenan could taste it as he was driving home with his windows up that evening in 2004. He called 911 and the gas company, thinking a punctured gas line was to blame, but the smell and the evacuation it prompted came from something few knew existed in town: fracking waste. “I had no idea what was going on,” said Keenan, 54, who by...

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OIL INDUSTRY’S SUPPRESSION OF CLIMATE SCIENCE BEGAN IN 1940’S, DOCUMENTS REVEAL...

Apr 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Nadia Prupis / Common Dreams   VIA TRUTHDIG Tim J Keegan / CC BY 2.0 A trove of newly uncovered documents shows that fossil fuel companies were explicitly warned of the risks of climate change decades earlier than previously suspected. And while it’s no secret—anymore—that the companies knew about those dangers long ago, the documents, published Wednesday by the Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), reveal even more about the broader industry effort to suppress climate science and foment public doubt about global warming. Industry executives met in Los Angeles in 1946 to discuss growing public concern about air pollution. That meeting led to the formation of a panel—suitably named the Smoke and Fumes Committee—to conduct research into air pollution issues. But the research was not meant to be a public service;...

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THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON FUNGICIDES...

Apr 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Mark Sumner  DAILY KOS This guy might not be the only one who ends up in a fog. Science Matters Daily Kos While Republicans are actively trying to bring back DDT to please big agriculture, concern is growing about other pesticides and fungicides that are already out there. In your food. In your body. In your brain. … a team of University of North Carolina Neuroscience Center researchers led by Mark Zylka subjected mouse cortical neuron cultures—which are similar in cellular and molecular terms to the the human brain—to 294 chemicals “commonly found in the environment and on food.” The idea was to see whether any of them triggered changes that mimicked patterns found in brain samples from people with autism, advanced age, and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. This is initial research, and obviously mouse brain...

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HOW A PAPER PLANT IN ARKANSAS IS ALLEGEDLY POISONING THE PEOPLE OF CROSSETT...

Apr 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Tech & Science By Emily Crane Linn NEWSWEEK The Georgia-Pacific’s aeration pond in Crossett, Arkansas. The paper and plywood plant employs a large amount of the surrounding community and many in the area blame the plant’s pollution for the severe health issues residents are facing. Nicolaus Czarnecki/ZUMA/Alamy “Let me give you a sketch of the neighborhood,” Leroy Patton said as he put his car in Park on the side of Lawson Road. He took his toothpick out of his mouth and used it to point to an empty house, an abandoned doll lying facedown in the weeds in front of the hollow structure. The Lawson couple used to live here, Patton says; the street was named for them. “They’re dead from cancer and stroke.” He pointed to another property. “Down here is Pat....

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Infographic: How Ocean Pollution Impacts Marine Life—and All of Us...

Apr 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Much of the plastic we produce ends up in the ocean, where it kills fish, sea turtles and marine mammals. By Torben Lonne / AlterNet Environmental Pollution – A discarded white plastic bags drifts over a tropical coral reef Photo Credit: Richard Whitcombe/Shutterstock The world’s oceans are a magical, diverse and abundant ecosystem that mankind needs in order to survive. The oceans cover over 72 percent of the planet’s surface, provide over 97 percent of the world’s water supply and over 70 percent of the oxygen we breathe. We have so much to thank the oceans for; however, they are threatened daily by natural and manmade pollution. Ocean pollution comes in many forms, but the largest factor affecting the oceans is plastic. Over the last decade, we have produced more plastic than...

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WHILE THEY WERE SHOUTING — A BOTANIST’S LAMENT ABOUT PRESIDENTIAL POLITICS...

Apr 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  By Andrew C. Revkin   Photo Clockwise from top left, Donald J. Trump, Hillary Clinton, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Senator Ted Cruz of Texas during campaign events.Credit Left, Eric Thayer for The New York Times; Top right, Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times; Bottom right, Max Whittaker for The New York Times Peter H. Raven, a lifelong prober and defender of biological diversity and president emeritus of the Missouri Botanical Garden, just distributed a note placing this year’s surreally unpredictable presidential race (watch in virtual “surreality” here) in the broader context of consequential environmental and social trends that perpetually seem to hide in plain sight. He starts with a retro-feeling reflection by Adlai Stevenson and then links to an essay he just wrote for Environmental Health News, which is reposted here:...

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