ENERGY COMPANY WANTS TO LEGALLY DUMP COAL ASH WASTE INTO VIRGINIA RIVERS...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Alejandro Davila Fragoso The Possum Point Power Station will transfer millions of gallons of treated water from toxic coal ash ponds into Virginia’s Quantico Creek if the state water board decides Thursday to allow Dominion, an energy company, to do so. The same could happen in the James River with another Dominion owned facility.   DUMFRIES, VA — From their spacious living room, Taya Barnett and her husband Donald could look out the window Sunday afternoon and see Virginia’s Quantico Creek in all its grandeur. It was rainy but pleasant. Droplets fell here and there on the back porch. All while the blue sky revealed itself through the clouds that reflected on waters that flow through the largest protected natural area in the D.C. metropolitan...

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Headaches and Nosebleeds Reported as Months-Long Methane Leak Continues in Los Angeles (VIDEO)...

Dec 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Over 1,000 families have chosen to relocate and the school district recently authorized the two local schools to move out of the area. By Hilary Lewis / Earthworks  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Lano Lan/Shutterstock Have you ever seen methane? What about benzene? Or the chemical the gas company adds to make your stovetop gas stink, mercaptan? I asked residents at a Save Porter Ranch meeting in northwest Los Angeles if they had seen the pollution they knew was in their community, pouring down from the SoCal Gas storage facility on the hill behind town. No one responded. For months now, methane pollution has been billowing from the breached facility into their community. Families have reported bad odors resulting in headaches and nosebleeds. Over 1,000 families have already chosen to relocate and the...

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Incredible Infographic Shows How We Have Ruined Our Oceans — and Ourselves as a Result...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment From plastic trash and discarded fishing gear to oil spills and pesticide runoff, human beings have treated the oceans as a vast dumping ground. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: Fotos593/Shutterstock.com The oceans cover more than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface and contain 97 percent of the Earth’s water. But they remain largely a mystery to us. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, less than five percent of the world’s oceans have been explored. It has often been said that we know more about the moon than we do the oceans. But one thing we do know about the oceans is that they are getting more and more polluted. From plastic trash and discarded fishing gear to oil spills and pesticide runoff, human beings have treated the oceans...

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FRACKING EXPANDS IN LATIN AMERICA, THREATENING TO CONTAMINATE WORLD’S THIRD-LARGEST AQUIFIER...

Dec 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Fracking Spanning an area that includes southern Brazil and part of Paraguay, Argentina and Uruguay, the Guaraní Aquifer holds 20 percent of South America’s water. By Santiago Navarro, Renata Bessi / Truthout   VIA ALTERNET December 11, 2015 Photo Credit: Calin Tatu/Shutterstock.com Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking – a method whereby hydrocarbons trapped within rocks are extracted – is expanding rapidly in Latin America. Fracking emits benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene, which are considered by the World Health Organization to be carcinogenic and responsible for blood disorders and other immunological effects. Despite these adverse health effects, however, reserves have already been mapped out in Bolivia, Colombia, Venezuela, Paraguay, Uruguay, Chile, Argentina, Brazil and Mexico. In Mexico, recently passed energy reform legislation promotes fracking as a means of extracting shale gas – and with the reform,...

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Owner Of Mine That Spilled Toxic Waste Into A Colorado River Compares The EPA To Rapists...

Dec 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Nicole Gentile – Guest Contributor & Jessica Goad -CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Brennan Linsley In this Aug. 14, 2015 photo, water flows through a series of sediment retention ponds built to reduce heavy metal and chemical contaminants from the Gold King Mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about 1/4 mile downstream from the mine, outside Silverton, Colo.   Photos of the bright-orange colored Animas River in southwestern Colorado made international headlines in August after three million gallons of toxic mining sludge poured into it. Contractors working for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally released the waste while attempting to clean up the site, abandoned by its original owners decades ago. But now, three months later, the owner of the Gold King Mine told the Durango Herald that it’s he who feels “victimized”...

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THINGS ARE COMPLICATED BETWEEN ARCTIC SEA ICE AND AIR POLLUTION...

Oct 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] NASA By Suzanne Jacobs GRIST Sea ice and air pollution are in a bit of a love-hate relationship right now. On the one hand, pollution from extracting and burning fossil fuels is causing global warming, which is melting all the sea ice. On the other hand, other kinds of pollution from burning said fossil fuels is reflecting sunlight and thus delaying said melting. So while sea ice’s friends are all, “That pollution is bad news, man!,” ice is all: And it is bad news: Summer sea ice levels in the Arctic were their fourth lowest on record this year, Scientific American reports. And thanks to our own complicated relationship with greenhouse gases (above GIF also applies), those levels are declining at a rate of about 13 percent per decade. But in a recent paper published in Geophysical Research Letters,...

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INDONESIA’S WILDFIRES ARE AS BAD AS SOME OF THE PLANET’S WORST AIR POLLUTERS...

Oct 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] An eye-popping amount of greenhouse gas issues from the thousands of blazes in the Southeast Asian country. Smoke rises as a fire burns in a forest in Ogan Komering Ilir Regency, a regency of South Sumatra province, Indonesia, on Oct. 20. (Photo: Nova Wahyudi/Antara Foto/Reuters)   They’ve burned for weeks, producing toxic smoke that has blanketed much of Southeast Asia and caused air quality to plummet. But just how bad is the pollution generated by the wildfires raging across Indonesia? Between Sept. 1 and Oct. 14, the fires—which are allegedly being intentionally set by businesses looking to make a buck producing palm oil—may have produced more air pollution than Germany does in a calendar year. Although Germany has one of the worst air pollution problems in Europe, try this on for size: The pollution generated...

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STUDY LINKS FRACKING TO PREMATURE BIRTHS, HIGH-RISK PREGNANCIES...

Oct 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock Women who live near fracking wells were 40 percent more likely to have a preterm birth, a new study found.   A new study from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has linked hydraulic fracturing — the process of pumping chemical-laced water into shale to extract the oil or gas embedded within — to premature births and high-risk pregnancies. Preterm births were 40 percent higher among women who lived in areas of intense drilling and fracking operations, and these women’s pregnancies were 30 percent more likely to be considered “high-risk,” the authors found. Preterm birth — when a baby is born earlier than the 37th week of pregnancy — is associated with a range of medical problems, according to the Centers for Disease Control...

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THIS INTERACTIVE MAP SHOWS THE TOXIC SITES NEAR YOU...

Oct 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Thaddeus Rombauer By Katie Herzog GRIST Despite the jaunty name, Superfund sites are not actually super fun. In fact, they are the opposite. They are hazardous waste sites, and you probably don’t want to raise your kids or park your bounce house near them unless you’re pro-cancer. The first — and most famous — Superfund site was Love Canal, a neighborhood in Niagara Falls, N.Y., where 22,000 tons of toxic waste were buried by Hooker Chemical Company and caused illnesses, miscarriages, birth defects, and death among residents. There are currently more than 1,300 Superfund sites in the U.S., and now, thanks to media artist Brooke Singer, you can more easily find any in your area — and then decide if it’s time to pack your bags and move somewhere less likely to make you grow a tail. Singer is the creator of...

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OBAMA SQUANDERS OPPORTUNITY TO CLEAN UP SMOG AND FIGHT CLIMATE CHANGE...

Oct 2, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Reuters / Mike Blake By Ben Adler   GRIST Like liberals who are struggling to accept that Pope Francis met with America’s most anti-gay county clerk last week, environmentalists are feeling betrayed by President Obama. On Thursday, the Environmental Protection Agency released a new regulation for ground-level ozone, a primary ingredient in smog — and it’s much weaker than green groups wanted. The Obama administration has a long and tortured history with the smog rule; the EPA moved to strengthen it in 2011 but was overruled by the White House. Now the administration has finally imposed a new rule, only it’s too lax and four years too late. EPA is lowering the definition of a safe level for ozone from below 75 parts per billion to 70 ppb. That’s still well above what the...

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EPA RULE AIMS TO CURB TOXIC COAL PLANT POLLUTION IN WATERWAYS...

Oct 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Matthew Brown This June 17, 2011 photo shows PPL Montana’s J.E. Corette coal-fired power plant along the Yellowstone River in Billings, Mont. The Environmental Protection Agency announced new rules Wednesday aimed at curbing the amount of pollution that power plants dump into streams. The rule, known as the Steam Electric Power Generating Effluent Guidelines, targets steam electric power plants — plants that use steam to drive the electric generator — that dump large amounts of toxic pollutants into streams every year. The rule, according to the EPA, marks the first time the federal government has set limits on the amount of toxic metals that power plants can discharge into streams. The EPA estimates that the rule will keep 1.4 billion pounds of toxic metals and other...

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DESPITE ALL-CLEAR FROM EPA, NEW STUDIES SHOW LINGERING CONTAMINATION AFTER ANIMAS RIVER SPILL...

Sep 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Natasha Geiling CREDIT: AP Photo/Brennan Linsley Water flows down Cement Creek just below the site of the blowout at the Gold King mine which triggered a major spill of toxic wastewater, outside Silverton, Colo., Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015.   On September 2, the EPA released data showing that water and sediment samples taken from the San Juan River — whose largest tributary, the Animas River, was tainted with three million gallons of toxic wastewater from the Gold King Mine spill earlier this summer — had returned to pre-spill levels. On September 16, during a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, EPA administrator Gina McCarthy reiterated those findings. But a spate of recently released studies paint a less positive picture of the river’s return to health. According to Al...

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THE MOST PROFOUNDLY EVIL CRIME COMMITED BY EXXONMOBIL TO DATE...

Sep 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   JACQUELINE MARCUS FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT (Photo: JW Randolph)From the time I was a teenager, I’ve wrestled with the question of good and evil. The question led me to the study of philosophy and literature. When I was sixteen years old, I began reading the Russian authors, starting with Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment.   Naïve, I sided with Alyosha Karamazov, a saintly loving monk—a man who, despite the despicable things that humans do to one another, held faith in the goodness of God, and in the idea that humans are fundamentally good, but they do evil things in a state of ignorance. This idea that evil is committed in a state of ignorance goes back to Plato’s definition of wrongdoing, a concept that St. Augustine accepted, only he referred to the Higher Good...

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DUTCH STUDENT DESIGNS OCEAN CLEANUP ARRAY...

Sep 2, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]         the ocean cleanup array won the 2015 INDEX: award due its potential to address one the largest global challenges. the innovative and well-researched idea by 21-year-old dutch engineering student boyan slat, will greatly improve the condition of the earth’s greatest natural resource, as well as the lives of millions. ‘we live in a plastic age and we’ve already recognised a number of global challenges related to the oceans,’ explains index: award jury member katinka von der lippe, strategic design, aestethics & design management at eker design/hydrolift. ‘it’s about time we’re serious about a resource that makes up over 70% of the world’s surface.’ a rendered image of the plastic collection platform         the solution will not only have tremendous benefits for the environment and biodiversity, but will improve...

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TOO WARM, TOO FEW FISH: HEALTH WARNING FOR WORLD’S OCEANS...

Aug 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Kieran Cooke, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Overfishing compounds ocean damage from climate change. (John Wallace / NOAA via Wikimedia Commons) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The world’s oceans—covering nearly two-thirds of the Earth’s surface, and on which much of human life depends—are under severe pressure, a report says. Over-fishing has dramatically reduced fish stocks. The thousands of tonnes of rubbish dumped in the oceans wreak havoc on marine life, while climate change is warming and acidifying them, putting them under further stress. These are the sobering conclusions of a wide-ranging study of the Earth’s ecosystems by the Worldwatch Institute, a US-based organisation widely rated as one of the world’s foremost environmental think-tanks. “Our sense of the ocean’s power and omnipotence—combined with scientific ignorance—contributed to...

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WE’RE MAKING MASSIVE WASTE ISLANDS IN THE SEA...

Aug 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] We’re making massive waste islands in the seahttps://youtu.be/mMG1SdeYLFE By Clayton Aldern  GRIST https://youtu.be/mMG1SdeYLFE That message in a bottle you tossed into the sea as a youngrapscallion? Remember how you didn’t get a response? It’s because oceans aren’t the same thing as carrier pigeons. Instead of sending bottles bobbing merrily on their way across the Pacific, ocean currents tend to push bits of trash to convergence points in the ocean called garbage patches.The video above shows a new data visualization from NASA illustrating the phenomenon. By mapping the paths of free-floating ocean buoys distributed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration over a period of 35 years, scientists were able to verify the garbage patch effect, as well as the locations of the patches. Aside from providing these insights, the visualization is a win...

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EPA’s Colorado Mine Spill: What You Need to Know...

Aug 13, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The agency spilled 3 million gallons of toxic wastewater into a Colorado river. Here’s the latest. By Clara Chaisson / OnEarth Magazine  VIA ALTERNET August 12, 2015 Photo Credit: EPA Right now Colorado’s Animas River looks more like an ad for Tang than the scenic blue ribbon it usually is. Last Wednesday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally released three million gallons of heavy-metal-laden mining waste, and the toxic surge is making its way downriver. Here’s the latest on what’s going on. Wait, the EPA did that? Yes. The agency is typically in the business of cleaning upthis kind of mess, but in this case, well, it screwed up — big time. While supervising the drainage of the Gold King Mine near Silverton, Colorado (one of many abandoned mines in the area) workers breached an...

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“Catastrophe!” Screamed the Newspaper Headline...

Aug 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] via DAILY KOS by Thinking FellaFollow for Four Corners Kossacks At approximately 10:30am on Wednesday, August 5th, 2015, the wheels were set in motion for a man-made disaster in the Animas River watershed near Durango, Colorado. Truth be told–those wheels have been grinding slowly for decades, but on the date & time above the dam finally broke. Literally. Our river now looks like this: Photo courtesy of The La Plata County Emergency Management Office Follow me over the pile of toxic Heavy Metals for a sad tale of greed, corruption, delays, misguided civic boosters, the EPA, and my town’s beloved & now destroyed river. I suppose this story begins over a century ago, in the rugged & beautiful southern Rocky Mountains. The San Juan Mountains, beautiful as they are, held a thing even...

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ABANDONED MINE LEAKS MILLIONS OF GALLONS OF BRIGHT ORANGE, TOXIC WATER INTO COLORADO RIVER...

Aug 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: EPA A mine blew out last week, leaking three million gallons of bright orange water into a Colorado river.   Three million gallons of bright orange wastewater has spilled from an abandoned mine in Colorado, after Environmental Protection Agency efforts to contain the mine’s toxic water went awry last week. According to the EPA’s onsite coordinator, a team was working to “investigate and address contamination” at a nearby mine when they unexpectedly triggered the spill from the Gold King Mine, which is still pumping 500 gallons of contaminated water per minute into the Animas River, near Silverton, Colorado. The EPA has been trying for years to get some areas around Silverton declared a Superfund site — a designation which would direct federal funds toward cleanup — but...

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AFTER 6 YEARS OF TALK, INTERIOR DEPT. FINALLY RELEASES NEW COAL MINING RULES TO MIXED REVIEW...

Jul 19, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]     Environmental advocates give them a mixed review. Kate Sheppard Senior reporter/Environment and energy editor, The Huffington Post   WASHINGTON — The Department of the Interior issued long-awaited regulations on Thursday for protecting streams from the adverse effects of surface coal mining. The proposed rules, issued by the department’s Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, mark the first major update to the surface mining regulations in 32 years. They will require coal companies to do before and after environmental analysis at mining sites, mandate that companies invest in restoration work like replanting trees, and increase requirements for monitoring of impacts during mining operations. The rules have been in the works for six years. “A lot has changed since rules were written in the early 1980s,” said Interior Secretary Sally Jewell in a call...

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NATIONS AGREE TO LEAVE ARCTIC FISH ALONE, BUT THE U.S. KEEPS DRILLING...

Jul 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] With melting sea ice opening the Arctic Ocean to a potentially huge increase in commercial fishing, the five nations that border the region signed a declaration Thursday that will prohibit trawling in international waters. The United States, Canada, Russia, Denmark, and Norway agreed that while the frigid Arctic isn’t a productive commercial fishery, climate change means it could be as the ice melts and fish migrate north to warming waters So, Why Should You Care? Instead of exploiting the potential fishery in a Wild West–style aquatic rush, the five nations are planning to impose a moratorium until more scientific research can give a clearer picture on the sustainability of the region. Then regulations will be issued to regulate commercial fishing. The deal “will prevent a problem from arising ahead of time,” David Balton,...

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DDT’S TOXIC LEGACY CONTINUES...

Jul 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] More than 40 years after it was banned in the U.S., DDT is still in the environment — and it’s still being sprayed in many African homes to combat malaria. By Kristin Schafer / Pesticide Action Network North America  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Zerbor/Shutterstock.com Last month’s groundbreaking DDT study — linking exposure in the womb to increased risk of breast cancer — represents more than an interesting footnote in the story of this legacy pesticide. Not only is DDT still in our environment more than 40 years after it was banned in the U.S., it also continues to be sprayed inside homes in many African countries as part of malaria control programs — a practice that could be quadrupling the risk, it turns out, of breast cancer among daughters of women exposed to...

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THE TEN DIRTIEST POWER COMPANIES IN THE U.S....

Jul 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]  GRIST Duke Energy By Tim McDonnell This story is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Coal-fired power plants are the single biggest driver of global climate change in the United States. That’s why President Barack Obama’s Environmental Protection Agency is moving quickly to put the finishing touches on a new set of regulations, called the Clean Power Plan, that aim to reduce the nation’s overall carbon footprint 30 percent by 2030 by cracking down on emissions from the energy sector. Unsurprisingly, many power companies — particularly those that rely on coal as their main source of fuel — are crying foul. Recently, one major coal company and a dozen coal-reliant states tried to block the new rules in federal court. (The court decided last month not to hear the challenge, since the rules haven’t yet been...

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THE UNSEEN EXTINCTION WIPING OUT THE WORLD’S WILDLIFE...

Jun 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Researchers find that species we ignore, such as snails, are disappearing at a rapid pace — a sign that a mass extinction is upon us. By John R. Platt / TakePart   VIA ALTERNET For years now, conservationists have warned that Earth is in the middle of the “sixth great extinction,” with dozens of species going extinct every day owing to habitat loss, pollution, climate change and other factors. But here’s even worse news: That may be just the tip of the iceberg. According to new research, previous estimates may seriously underestimate the number of species that we’re losing. A paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that we may have already lost 130,000 species, or a staggering 7 percent of the world’s total biodiversity. How could we...

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CANCER-CAUSING CHEMICALS FOUND IN DRINKING WATER NEAR TEXAS FRACKING SITES...

Jun 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha PageCLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/LM Otero   Scientists have found elevated levels of cancer-causing chemicals in the drinking water in North Texas’ Barnett Shale region — where a fracking boom has sprouted more than 20,000 oil and gas wells. Researchers from the University of Texas, Arlington tested water samples from public and private wells collected over the past three years and found elevated levels of heavy metals, such as arsenic. Their findings, released Wednesday, showed elevated levels of 19 different chemicals including the so-called BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylenes) compounds. Heavy metals are toxic when ingested, and BTEX compounds are considered carcinogenic when ingested. Exposure to BTEX compounds is also associated with effects on the respiratory and central nervous system. The study found elevated levels of toxic methanol and...

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FUKUSHIMA: THE STORY OF A NUCLEAR DISASTER...

Jun 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Louise Rubacky   TRUTHDIG The New Press To see long excerpts from “Fukushima” at Google Books, click here. “Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster” A book by David Lochbaum, Edwin Lyman, Susan Q. Stranahan and the Union of Concerned Scientists In “Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster,” a team of scientists and a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist recount what happens when a catastrophe strikes that no one imagines. No one with the clout to prevent it, that is. It’s a tale of entwined worlds that must cooperate intelligently in order to protect the public. The tensions and cross-purposes among them, however, lead to indecision, inaction and increased calamity. In crisis, these worlds—the nuclear energy industry, two powerful governments, and international regulatory commissions—are about as effective as a machine lubed with super...

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A ‘HOUSE OF HORRORS’: Thousands Of Michigan Residents Subject To Contaminated Drinking Water...

Jun 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Rupali Srivastava  CLIMATE PROGRESS Unsafe drinking water worries Flint, Michigan, residents. CREDIT: Shutterstock Thousands of Michigan residents are being exposed to potentially contaminated drinking water that could pose threats to their health and well-being, residents and lawmakers said at a Wednesday hearing. Members of both political parties and chambers of the state Congress invited residents from the Detroit area to voice concerns about the drinking water. Since withdrawing from the Detroit water system in April 2014, the city of Flint, which is about 70 miles northwest of Detroit and has a population of nearly 100,000, has used water from the Flint River for its residents, drawing criticism from many who say it is unsafe. Safety tests conducted in 2014 and early 2015 showed high levels of TTHM or THM in the drinking...

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Every Day, U.S. Factory Farms Produce Enough Waste to Fill the Empire State Building...

May 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment A new reports says factory farms are a #LoadOfCrap. By Anastasia Pantsios / EcoWatch   VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Food & Water Watch Factory farming has been expanding in the U.S. over the last two decades, and the size of those farms has increased dramatically — dominating the market, squeezing out smaller producers and setting the agenda for farming practices — to the detriment of food consumers. That’s the conclusion of a new study, Factory Farm Nation: 2015 Edition, released by Food & Water Watch. “Over the last two decades, small- and medium-scale farms raising livestock have given way to factory farms that confine thousands of cows, hogs and chickens in tightly packed facilities,” says the report. “Farmers have adopted factory farming practices largely at the behest of the largest meatpackers, pork processors, poultry...

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You Wouldn’t in a Million Years Believe What’s Killing Off Dolphins...

May 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Bottlenose dolphins in the northern Gulf of Mexico have been dying at unusually high rates since 2010. Can you guess why? By Sabrina Canfield / Courthouse News   VIA ALTERNET NEW ORLEANS (CN) – Lung and adrenal lesions in dolphins, and an increase in bottlenose dolphin deaths in the Gulf of Mexico, is likely linked to exposure to pollutants from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, according to researchers by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association. According to a report published Wednesday in the peer-reviewed online journal PLOS ONE, bottlenose dolphins in the northern Gulf of Mexico have been dying at unusually high rates since 2010. This ongoing die-off includes the highest number of bottlenose dolphin deaths on record and coincided – not coincidentally, according to the study – with the largest offshore oil spill...

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Pipeline Spews 21,000 Gallons of Oil Along California Coast...

May 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Four-mile-long oil slick fouls some of the state’s most beautiful coastline at Refugio State Beach. By Anastasia Pantsios / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department A broken pipeline spewed oil into the Pacific Ocean Tuesday, creating an oil slick four miles long on some of the state’s most beautiful coastline at Refugio State Beach just north of Santa Barbara. An estimated 21,000 gallons of oil spilled, according to an early Coast Guard estimate. Refugio State Beach and area fisheries are closed, and it is unknown when the beach will reopen. “I’m a surfer, I’m a fisherman—I like sitting out here and breathing it in,” construction worker Josh Marsh, who was part of the clean-up crew, told the Los Angeles Times. “To see it like this, to see it destroyed—it hurts.” After  people...

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