PREVENTING THE NEXT FLINT WITH TECHNOLOGY YOU CAN MAKE AT HOME...

Apr 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] How do we know the water flowing from our taps is safe and free from contaminants? For the most part, we trust that regulators and inspectors have done their jobs, and we likely don’t think about it much. We just fill our glasses, take our showers, and brush our toddlers’ teeth. But then Flint happens, or the 2014 Elk River spill in West Virginia that left 300,000 people in nine counties without water for weeks. In West Virginia, a group of students, ecologists, and public radio journalists have hatched a DIY pilot project they hope will keep another Flint or Elk River from happening. They placed six simple, low-cost sensors—developed by Public Lab and the MIT Media Lab—in the Monongahela River to show that ordinary citizens can collect and interpret water-quality data in...

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Fracking a Possible Cause of Disturbing Birth Defects and Deaths Found in Horses...

Apr 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Research has linked the presence of the byproducts of hydraulic fracturing to numerous animal deaths and stillbirths. By Lorraine Berry / Raw Story Photo Credit: Screenshot/Ithaca Journal In New York’s Southern Tier, local newspapers are investigating the connection between a local racetrack owner’s sick foals and the fracking fluids present on his farmland. The Ithaca Journal featured a report by Tom Wilber in which he investigated the ongoing issue with foals being born without the ability to swallow — seventeen of them so far — on the breeding farm of Jeff Gural, owner of the Tioga Downs, Meadowlands Racetrack, and Vernon Downs. The foals have survived, although all of them have had to be transported to Cornell’s School of Veterinary Medicine, located fifty miles north in Ithaca, New York. An earlier study by Cornell professor Robert Oswald...

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‘Catastrophic Leak’ Found at Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington State...

Apr 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment “This is probably the biggest event to ever happen in tank farm history.” The Watchers Radioactive waste ; Chemist in protective suit the disposal of radioactive waste Photo Credit: overcrew/Shutterstock The amount of radioactive waste that has been leaking between the two walls of one of the underground tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State for several years grew dramatically on Sunday, April 17, with up to 13,000 liters (3,500 gallons) of new waste. The leak occurred at the double-shell storage known as AY-102, which has been leaking small amounts of nuclear waste since 2011. It is estimated that about 265 liters (70 gallons) of waste leaked from the tank in recent years. Although it’s unclear exactly how much waste spilled out over the weekend, estimates place the amount at somewhere between 11,300...

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JUST MONTHS AFTER THE LARGEST NATURAL GAS LEAK IN U.S. HISTORY, PORTER RANCH IS HIT WITH ANOTHER LEAK...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Brian Melley This photo taken Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2016 shows a neighborhood in the Porter Ranch section of Los Angeles where residents have moved out because of a natural gas leak from a Southern California Gas Co. storage facility. Porter Ranch already experienced the largest recorded natural gas leak in U.S. history over the winter, when a leak at the Aliso Canyon Storage Facility spewed more than 97,000 metric tons of methane into the atmosphere. Thousands of families were evacuated during the nearly four-month long leak, which was sealed in February. Over the weekend, the neighborhood was hit with another natural gas leak. “This is horrible,” Porter Ranch resident Gabriel Khanlian told ThinkProgress. “This issue is not over with in any way.” Residents had been complaining...

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AS FRACKING CHEMICALS REACH A CREEK COMPANIES FIGHT AGAINST A FRACKING WASTE BAN...

Apr 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] CREDIT: Bill Dickinson/Flickr View of the New River bridge in Fayette County, West Virginia. A tributary of the New River has traces of endocrine disrupting chemicals associated with fracking, according to a new study. Researchers discovered the chemicals near a fracking fluid waste site. The New River is a local water source.   The smell of gas surrounding the northern streets of Lochgelly, West Virginia, was so pungent that Brad Keenan could taste it as he was driving home with his windows up that evening in 2004. He called 911 and the gas company, thinking a punctured gas line was to blame, but the smell and the evacuation it prompted came from something few knew existed in town: fracking waste. “I had no idea what was going on,” said Keenan, 54, who by...

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OIL INDUSTRY’S SUPPRESSION OF CLIMATE SCIENCE BEGAN IN 1940’S, DOCUMENTS REVEAL...

Apr 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Nadia Prupis / Common Dreams   VIA TRUTHDIG Tim J Keegan / CC BY 2.0 A trove of newly uncovered documents shows that fossil fuel companies were explicitly warned of the risks of climate change decades earlier than previously suspected. And while it’s no secret—anymore—that the companies knew about those dangers long ago, the documents, published Wednesday by the Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), reveal even more about the broader industry effort to suppress climate science and foment public doubt about global warming. Industry executives met in Los Angeles in 1946 to discuss growing public concern about air pollution. That meeting led to the formation of a panel—suitably named the Smoke and Fumes Committee—to conduct research into air pollution issues. But the research was not meant to be a public service;...

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THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON FUNGICIDES...

Apr 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Mark Sumner  DAILY KOS This guy might not be the only one who ends up in a fog. Science Matters Daily Kos While Republicans are actively trying to bring back DDT to please big agriculture, concern is growing about other pesticides and fungicides that are already out there. In your food. In your body. In your brain. … a team of University of North Carolina Neuroscience Center researchers led by Mark Zylka subjected mouse cortical neuron cultures—which are similar in cellular and molecular terms to the the human brain—to 294 chemicals “commonly found in the environment and on food.” The idea was to see whether any of them triggered changes that mimicked patterns found in brain samples from people with autism, advanced age, and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. This is initial research, and obviously mouse brain...

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HOW A PAPER PLANT IN ARKANSAS IS ALLEGEDLY POISONING THE PEOPLE OF CROSSETT...

Apr 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Tech & Science By Emily Crane Linn NEWSWEEK The Georgia-Pacific’s aeration pond in Crossett, Arkansas. The paper and plywood plant employs a large amount of the surrounding community and many in the area blame the plant’s pollution for the severe health issues residents are facing. Nicolaus Czarnecki/ZUMA/Alamy “Let me give you a sketch of the neighborhood,” Leroy Patton said as he put his car in Park on the side of Lawson Road. He took his toothpick out of his mouth and used it to point to an empty house, an abandoned doll lying facedown in the weeds in front of the hollow structure. The Lawson couple used to live here, Patton says; the street was named for them. “They’re dead from cancer and stroke.” He pointed to another property. “Down here is Pat....

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Infographic: How Ocean Pollution Impacts Marine Life—and All of Us...

Apr 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Much of the plastic we produce ends up in the ocean, where it kills fish, sea turtles and marine mammals. By Torben Lonne / AlterNet Environmental Pollution – A discarded white plastic bags drifts over a tropical coral reef Photo Credit: Richard Whitcombe/Shutterstock The world’s oceans are a magical, diverse and abundant ecosystem that mankind needs in order to survive. The oceans cover over 72 percent of the planet’s surface, provide over 97 percent of the world’s water supply and over 70 percent of the oxygen we breathe. We have so much to thank the oceans for; however, they are threatened daily by natural and manmade pollution. Ocean pollution comes in many forms, but the largest factor affecting the oceans is plastic. Over the last decade, we have produced more plastic than...

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WHILE THEY WERE SHOUTING — A BOTANIST’S LAMENT ABOUT PRESIDENTIAL POLITICS...

Apr 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  By Andrew C. Revkin   Photo Clockwise from top left, Donald J. Trump, Hillary Clinton, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Senator Ted Cruz of Texas during campaign events.Credit Left, Eric Thayer for The New York Times; Top right, Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times; Bottom right, Max Whittaker for The New York Times Peter H. Raven, a lifelong prober and defender of biological diversity and president emeritus of the Missouri Botanical Garden, just distributed a note placing this year’s surreally unpredictable presidential race (watch in virtual “surreality” here) in the broader context of consequential environmental and social trends that perpetually seem to hide in plain sight. He starts with a retro-feeling reflection by Adlai Stevenson and then links to an essay he just wrote for Environmental Health News, which is reposted here:...

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ALMOST HALF OF NATURAL WORLD HERITAGE SITES ARE THREATENED BY INDUSTRY, NEW REPORT SAYS...

Apr 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Rick Bowmer A view from the South Rim of the Grand Canyon National Park in Ariz. The Grand Canyon National Park suffers from unsustainable water use, according to a new UNESCO report, and is one of many sites worldwide facing threats from human activity.   Nearly half of all the natural World Heritage sites, including the Grand Canyon and the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the United States, are threatened by harmful industrial activity, according to a new World Wildlife Fund survey. World Heritage sites are symbols of conservation and culture that have been nominated by their countries for demonstrating outstanding universal value. Areas are inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List for their unique natural values, such as the scale of natural habitats, health...

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THE SIX INDIGENOUS WOMEN AT THE HEART OF FRACKING RESISTANCE IN ARGENTINA...

Apr 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Nancy Piñeiro Moreno and Translated by Laura Beratti, teleSUR | News Analysis These six Mapuche women have taken the risk of putting their bodies on the line to stop the drilling rigs from further endangering their community. Aboriginal women are central to the continent-wide resistance against extractivism, and the story of these women from the Campo Maripe community in the Argentine Patagonia is a solid example of their ongoing contribution, and the importance of indigenous resistance for social movements worldwide. Early one morning in March 2015, the lamgen Chela (‘sister’ in Mapuche language) says goodbye, gives me some jars of jam for my mother, and a message as I leave: “I know I don’t know her, but say hello to your mom for me okay.” A few minutes earlier I had...

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TPP WOULD FUEL CLIMATE CHAOS AND EMPOWER CORPORATE POLLUTERS...

Apr 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] MARK RUFFALO OF ECOWATCH ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT (Photo: EcoWatch)Article reprinted with permission from EcoWatch Many pundits were caught off-guard by the transpartisan fury over America’s trade policy rocking the presidential primary season. But it’s no surprise to me. I grew up in a working class family in Kenosha, Wisconsin. So I know why Americans have had enough of shiny promises, job-killing trade deals and Wall Street bailouts that propel ordinary people into an economic nose dive. Hard working Americans of all political stripes recognize when the rules have been rigged against them, because they live day-to-day with the results. No doubt revolutionary change is an appealing alternative. Since the North American Free Trade (NAFTA) and World Trade Organization agreements in the mid-1990s, America has lost more than five million manufacturing jobs net....

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Did You Know That Recycling Can Be a Dangerous Job?...

Mar 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Labor We need to raise pay and improve working conditions for recycling workers. By Gail Bateson, Barbara Rahke / AlterNet Photo Credit: Wikipedia Americans have made a decision: We’re throwing away the throwaway economy. Curbside recycling is available in more than 9,000 municipalities, and one-third of America’s waste stream is now diverted from landfills. It’s great that we’re conserving raw materials, saving money and reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. Now it’s time to make another decision: We need to raise pay and improve working conditions for recycling workers. These are green jobs and good for the environment. But they are also dangerous, with high rates of serious injury and even the risk of death. On March 1, a 42-year-old worker was killed at a Waste Management recycling plant in northeast Philadelphia, crushed to...

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STATE AGS VOW TO TACKLE CLIMATE CHANGE AND FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY FRAUD...

Mar 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Mary Altaffer New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman speaks during a news conference, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016, in New York.   A group of state attorneys general just declared war on big polluters. The group, representing 17 states, said it will pursue climate change litigation. Massachusetts and the U.S. Virgin Islands officially joined an ongoing investigation into potential fraud by ExxonMobil, and all the states committed to working together as “creatively, collaboratively, and aggressively” as possible to combat climate change. “We have heard the scientists; we know what is being done to the planet,” New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said at a press conference Tuesday in Manhattan. The group also came together to defend the EPA’s Clean Power Plan, formally filing its petition in...

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TOXIC POLLUTION IS STILL SEEPING INTO THE ANACOSTIA RIVER...

Mar 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jessica Tefft James Connolly, then executive director of the Anacostia Watershed, left, and Dick Turner of Fresh Creek Technologies, stand on a dock on the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. in early 2000. Pollution still washes into the Anacostia River as clean up efforts continue.   For over 140 years the Anacostia River that traverses Prince George’s County in Maryland into Washington, D.C. has been the dumping ground for industry and residents alike. While the industry disposed of toxic wastes, people dumped trash in obnoxious proportions and with that, the Anacostia turned into one of the most polluted rivers in the country. “Twenty-seven years ago we were pulling refrigerators, tires, cars,” Jim Foster, president of the Anacostia Watershed Society, told ThinkProgress, “people were dumping a...

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CARBON SINKS: THE NEXT BIG THING (PART 3)...

Mar 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE BLOG HUFFINGTON POST William S. Becker Executive Director, Presidential Climate Action Project This is the 3rd in a four-part post on using ecosystems to store carbon. Part 1 was about the need to bring the Earth’s carbon cycle back into balance. Part 2 discussed how restoring carbon sinks is a necessary part of America’s climate action plan. In this part, I describe why we should not always choose a technical fix to solve environmental problems. The late American critic Lawrence Clark Powell noted, “We are the children of the technological age”. He might have added that like children, we run to technology when we have a problem. We want a technical fix. A technical fix has appeal because it allows people to continue business as usual without the usual consequences — to...

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MICHAEL SHEEN AND MASSIVE ATTACK MEMBERS SUPPORT WELSH ANTI-FRACKING FILM...

Mar 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE GUARDIAN Welsh actor narrates A River documentary highlighting risk of river pollution from shale gas drilling in Pontrhydyfen village, Richard Burton’s birthplace   The actor Michael Sheen has given his support to an anti-fracking film opposing shale gas drilling in the Welsh village of Pontrhydyfen, Richard Burton’s birth place. Sheen narrates the documentary A River, which is soundtracked by original music from Robert Del Naja and Euan Dickinson of Massive Attack, and warns of a pollution risk to the river Afan from potential fracking in the area. Shown at the House of Commons on Wednesday, the film tells the story of how the river, which flows through the Afan Forest Park and converges with the river Pelenna in Pontrhydyfen, recovered from pollution caused by a century of industrial mining to become a...

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GLOBAL WARMING’S TERRIFYING NEW CHEMISTRY...

Mar 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Our leaders thought fracking would save our climate. They were wrong. Very wrong. By Bill McKibben / The Nation  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Calin Tatu/Shutterstock Global warming is, in the end, not about the noisy political battles here on the planet’s surface. It actually happens in constant, silent interactions in the atmosphere, where the molecular structure of certain gases traps heat that would otherwise radiate back out to space. If you get the chemistry wrong, it doesn’t matter how many landmark climate agreements you sign or how many speeches you give. And it appears the United States may have gotten the chemistry wrong. Really wrong. There’s one greenhouse gas everyone knows about: carbon dioxide, which is what you get when you burn fossil fuels. We talk about a “price on carbon” or argue...

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TO CUT OCEAN TRASH, ADRIAN GRENIER AND DELL ENLIST FILMMAKERS AND VIRTUAL REALITY...

Mar 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  NYTDOT Andrew C. Revkin   Photo Two scenes from a virtual-reality “ride” that takes viewers into the realm of whales, fish and sonic and plastic pollution.Credit Dell On a weekend visit to South by Southwest, the annual Austin festival focused on the intersection of ideas, technology, music and film, I ran into Adrian Grenier, who’s best known as an actor but is building a career as a filmmaker and campaigner with a focus on the environment. Photo Adrian Grenier shows off a 3-D virtual reality ocean journey at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Tex.Credit Courtesy of Dell Grenier, who last year signed on as the “social good advocate” for Dell, was there with the company’s sustainability and supply-chain directors and a remarkable virtual-reality “ride,” for lack of a better description, in...

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WOULD SAVING A LIVABLE CLIMATE DESTROY BUGGET’S FOSSIL FUEL EMPIRE?...

Mar 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  by Joe Romm  CLIMATE  PROGRESS CREDIT: Bruce Crummy, AP BNSF oil train derailment in 2013.   Billionaire Warren Buffett has bet the future of his company Berkshire Hathaway on dirty energy. In recent years he has been building a vertically-integrated fossil fuel empire — one that develops, delivers, processes, and burns the most climate-destroying fuels. The final part of this series on Buffett looks at how BNSF Railways is the engine of his carbon-intensive conglomerate, creating a massive risk for shareholders in this increasingly carbon-constrained world — a risk the “Oracle of Omaha” needs to be far more upfront about. Is Warren Buffett “The Profiteer” of “Climate Killers”? When Rolling Stone named Warren Buffett one of its 17 “Climate Killers” in 2010, they called him “The Profiteer.” They zeroed in on his recent...

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IN ONE OF THE MOST POLLUTED PLACES IN AMERICA, AIR QUALITY BOARD WEAKENS POLLUTION RULES...

Mar 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   On Friday, Southern California’s air quality board voted during a closed-door meeting to forcefully roll back pollution regulations in favor of regulations backed by oil refineries and other polluters. At the same time, the board also voted to dismiss their executive officer Barry Wallerstein, who had presided over the board since 1997. The South Coast Air Quality Management District board manages pollution in a four-county region of Southern California, including some of the most polluted areas in the country. Under Wallerstein’s tenure, the number of days that air quality exceeded federal standards dropped by a third, but environmental and public health groups are quick to note that Southern California’s pollution levels are still far from meeting federal health standards, according to the Los Angeles...

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Methane Discovered in Drinking Water Near Fracking Wells...

Mar 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment A Stanford researcher found the highest risk of leaks was from shallow natural gas wells drilled in California, Pennsylvania, and Texas. By Padma Nagappan / TakePart   VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: By Ostroff Law (Fracking Lawyer) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons A Stanford University scientist has found that people who live near shallowly drilled oil and natural gas wells risk drinking water contaminated with methane. A potent greenhouse gas, methane is highly flammable. “The main risk is from chemical spills and poorly constructed wells that leak,” said Rob Jackson, a professor of earth system science at Stanford, who presented his findings at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Washington, D.C., last week. “Our research shows that most problems typically occur within half a mile.” “In Parker County, Texas, we found homes...

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AN ATTEMPT TO LET COAL PLANTS EMIT UNLIMITED MERCURY WAS JUST SHUT DOWN BY SCOTUS...

Mar 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Emily AtkinCLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Regulations that limit heavy metal pollution from oil- and coal-fired power plants will continue to be enforced by the EPA — at least for now — thanks to Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. On Thursday, Roberts unilaterally rejected a petition from 20 conservative-led states asking the court to temporarily halt the regulations. Halting the regulations would effectively allow power plants to emit unlimited mercury, arsenic, chromium, and other toxic heavy metals into the environment. Led by Michigan, the states had asked the Supreme Court to stay the Mercury Air Toxics Standard — commonly referred to as MATS — while the D.C. Circuit court considers its legality. Last summer, the Supreme Court found that the EPA had not properly considered how much the rule would cost...

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Hold Your Breath — Nearly 200 Infrared Videos Expose Methane Pollution All Across the United States (VIDEO)...

Mar 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] It’s not just Aliso Canyon — fugitive, toxic methane gas escaping into the air is a much more widespread problem than anyone could have imagined. By Earthworks / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET Just as the worst methane leak in California’s history is sealed and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) acknowledged that America pollutes much more methane than previously estimated, Earthworks — the group that filmed the videos revealing the scope of the methane disaster in Los Angeles County — released a map of 180+ infrared videos of oil and gas methane pollution events across the country.     The map, created with the help of FracTracker Alliance, includes two new videos that epitomize the national methane pollution problem. The first is of a well near Longmont, Colorado: The second one is of a massive pipeline blowdown in North Dakota’s Bakken shale region: “In November of...

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Supreme Court Refuses To Take Up Case Challenging The Cleanup Of The Chesapeake Bay...

Mar 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Alex Dominguez Debris floats in the Chesapeake Bay north of the Bay Bridge on Monday, Sept. 12, 2011 in Sandy Point State Park, Md.   The Chesapeake Bay can forge ahead with its much-needed cleanup plan, after the Supreme Court decided Monday that it wouldn’t be taking up a case challenging the rule. The court’s decision not to take up the case, brought by the American Farm Bureau Federation and other agriculture and business interests, means that a lower court’s decision last July, which found that the effort is legal, stands. The cleanup effort, called the Chesapeake Bay Clean Water Blueprint sets a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for how much nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment pollution can enter the bay. Under the TMDL, these forms of...

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CALIFORNIA MOVES FORWARD WITH DRILLING IN PROTECTED AQUIFIERS...

Feb 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File California has both water and oil underground. Which is worth more?   A California regulator is asking the EPA to officially allow oil drilling and wastewater disposal in a protected aquifer near San Luis Obispo. The request is the first of dozens the state is expected to make, after revelations surfaced that the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources had, for years, improperly issued permits to inject wastewater into underground basins protected by the Clean Water Act. The California Water Board has signed off on its sister agency’s request, saying that the aquifer is separated from local drinking water sources by an “impermeable barrier.” But residents and environmentalists are skeptical. Californians have good reason to be skeptical that the division, known...

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HUNTING FOR THE NEUROSCIENCE OF HEAT AND VIOLENCE...

Feb 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Grist / Amelia Bates Climate on the Mind Climate on the Mind: A Series   By Clayton Aldern GRIST Six thousand years ago, Egyptian Sahara. The desert is moving. We know this to be true from carbon dating, from archaeological investigations, from satellite imagery; from geographers, climatologists, and anthropologists. For at least 6,000 years, the Sahara Desert — or what would become the Sahara Desert — has been expanding and contracting. Mostly it has been inching southward.For just as long, people scurry in its wake. Dynasties rise and fall. Pastoralists lead their cattle down away from the desert. Populations swell. The sands of time, too, do their inching. Jump. In the last decades of the 20th century, the multi-millennial creep of the desert is accompanied by an increased frequency of drought and heat waves that has...

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MEAT IS MURDERING AMERICAN RIVERS...

Feb 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Government data shows that food processing plants are the biggest toxic polluters of waterways in the U.S. Workers process turkeys at the West Liberty Foods processing plant in West Liberty, Iowa. (Photo: Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters)   There is no question that industrial agriculture is polluting the nation’s waterways, but huge factory farms are not the only culprits: Food processing plants also dump millions of pounds of toxic waste into rivers, lakes, and streams, according to an analysis released by Environment America, a national coalition of advocacy groups. The report listed the top 15 water polluters in terms of volume but focused mostly on Tyson Foods, which processes 73 million pounds of beef, pork, and poultry every week. “Tyson Foods Inc. and its subsidiaries dumped 104 million pounds of pollutants into waterways...

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ENERGY COMPANY WANTS TO LEGALLY DUMP COAL ASH WASTE INTO VIRGINIA RIVERS...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Alejandro Davila Fragoso The Possum Point Power Station will transfer millions of gallons of treated water from toxic coal ash ponds into Virginia’s Quantico Creek if the state water board decides Thursday to allow Dominion, an energy company, to do so. The same could happen in the James River with another Dominion owned facility.   DUMFRIES, VA — From their spacious living room, Taya Barnett and her husband Donald could look out the window Sunday afternoon and see Virginia’s Quantico Creek in all its grandeur. It was rainy but pleasant. Droplets fell here and there on the back porch. All while the blue sky revealed itself through the clouds that reflected on waters that flow through the largest protected natural area in the D.C. metropolitan...

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