HERE’S NEW NEWS ABOUT PESTICIDES AND BEES...

Jan 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Nathanael Johnson Bees are struggling, and several environmental organizations want to try to help them out by banning neonicotinoid pesticides. Now the EPA has published an assessment showing that one particular neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid, hurts bees. If you know about the travails of bees, but you’re a normal person who doesn’t follow this stuff obsessively, you are probably thinking one of two things: 1. Wait, haven’t we known for years that neonics are killing bees? 2. Wait, I thought I heard that neonics weren’t the problem! Does this prove that they actually are? Each of these starting places is part right, but also part wrong — so let’s back up one step. Background First, it’s crucial to zero in on what “killing bees” means. There’s a lot of overheated rhetoric about honeybees going extinct; that’s just not happening. There’s also...

read more

HONEY BEES ARE FACING A GLOBAL THREAT, AND IF THEY GO, SO DO WE...

Oct 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environmentalists and agribusiness are waging a pitched battle over the use of pesticides. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet   “There is one masterpiece, the hexagonal cell, that touches perfection. No living creature, not even man, has achieved, in the centre of his sphere, what the bee has achieved in her own: and were some one from another world to descend and ask of the earth the most perfect creation of the logic of life, we should needs have to offer the humble comb of honey.”— Maurice Maeterlinck, The Life of the Bee, 1924 What is the most important animal to humans? In prehistoric times, the dog helped transform early hunter-gatherers into apex predators. Later, human civilization was built on the backs of horses. But starting around 11,500 years ago, when humans began making...

read more

Monsanto’s Migraine: Big Fiascoes Facing the World’s Biggest Seed Company...

Oct 3, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment The problems are piling up at the company’s front door. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: a katz/Shutterstock.com Monsanto has been reeling from a number of setbacks around the globe. Here’s a look at some of the main reasons that 2015 has been a giant headache for the biotech giant. But that headache could find some reilef if the U.S. Senate hands them a legislative victory that would keep American consumers in the dark about what’s in their food. Roundup Probably Causes Cancer In March, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the World Health Organization’s cancer arm, said that the controversial herbicide glyphosate — the main ingredient in Monsanto’s popular weedkiller Roundup — is “probably carcinogenic to humans.” IARC noted, “Case-control studies of occupational exposure in the USA,...

read more

THE BEES HAVE THEIR DAY IN COURT — AND WIN BIG...

Sep 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   A federal appeals court overturns the government’s approval of a powerful new pesticide linked to pollinator deaths. (Photo: Derek Davis/Getty Images) Sep 11, 2015Taylor Hill is an associate editor at TakePart covering environment and wildlife.   A federal court has overturned the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s approval of sulfoxaflor, a pesticide linked to the mass die-off of honeybees that pollinate a third of the world’s food supply. The three-judge panel said the EPA green-lit sulfoxaflor even though initial studies showed the product was highly toxic to pollinators such as bees. The chemical compound belongs to a class of insecticides, known as neonicotinoids, that scientific studies have implicated in bee deaths.   “Because the EPA’s decision to unconditionally register sulfoxaflor was based on flawed and limited data, we conclude that the unconditional...

read more

STUDY FINDS A LINK BETWEEN NEONIC PESTICIDES AND HONEYBEE DEATHS...

Aug 21, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] A beekeeper in a field of rapeseed some 145 miles west of Bucharest, Romania    REUTERS/Radu Sigheti Johnny Neonic By Nathanael Johnson   GRIST A new study, published on Thursday, shows a correlation between honeybee colony deaths and neonicotinoid pesticide usage in the United Kingdom. Neonicotinoids generally come as a seed coating. When the seed sprouts, it takes in the pesticide, which then protects it against predators. But if that plant flowers, small amounts of the pesticide will linger in the pollen and nectar, which may hurt the beneficial insects, like bees, visiting those blooms to feed. There’s some controversy about this: Scientists have found some indications that the neonics are hurting wild honeybees, but not domestic honeybees. As Maj Rundlöf, the lead author of one of those studies, told Nature: “This doesn’t mean that there aren’t any negative...

read more

DDT’S TOXIC LEGACY CONTINUES...

Jul 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] More than 40 years after it was banned in the U.S., DDT is still in the environment — and it’s still being sprayed in many African homes to combat malaria. By Kristin Schafer / Pesticide Action Network North America  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Zerbor/Shutterstock.com Last month’s groundbreaking DDT study — linking exposure in the womb to increased risk of breast cancer — represents more than an interesting footnote in the story of this legacy pesticide. Not only is DDT still in our environment more than 40 years after it was banned in the U.S., it also continues to be sprayed inside homes in many African countries as part of malaria control programs — a practice that could be quadrupling the risk, it turns out, of breast cancer among daughters of women exposed to...

read more

HOW PALM OIL PRODUCTION IS TIED TO ECOCIDE IN GUATEMALA...

Jul 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The cultivation of palm oil is responsible for polluted rivers, vanishing forests and the displacement of communities. By Jeff Abbott / AlterNet   Early on June 6, communities along the once tranquil La Pasión River in northern Guatemala awoke to find tens of thousands of dead fish floating on the surface. This is the second time in two years that communities in northern Guatemala have seen massive fish die-offs in their rivers. Affected communities in Sayaxche, Peten blame the palm oil industry for this mass pollution of their river. “The palm industry has contaminated our river,” Rigoberto Lima, a teacher and representative from the communities of Sayaxché, told AlterNet. Researchers from the University of San Carlos in Guatemala City supported these accusations after confirming the high levels of agro-chemicals, including pesticides and fertilizer,...

read more

Health Alert update: VERY IMPORTANT, INFORMATIVE ARTICLE ABOUT DANGERS OF GLYPHOSATE AND GMO FOODS...

Jul 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Fwd: Health Alert update: VERY IMPORTANT, INFORMATIVE ARTICLE ABOUT DANGERS OF GLYPHOSATE AND GMO FOODS Inbox x to Casey PLEASE take the time to read this article sent out by Dr. Mercola.  The information shared with him by Dr. Samsel, a Ph.d. scientist and researcher, well credentialed and well qualified to conduct a viable scientific investigation, shows that Monsanto knew that glyphosate was carcinogenic to lab animals as far back as 1981, but falsely demanded the data be hidden and regarded as “trade secret”.  THIS SHOULD ALARM EVERYONE WHO STILL HAS ANY INDEPENDENT, CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS LEFT. Virtually everything in conventional supermarkets–unless it is reliably “organically grown”–is loaded with pesticide residue, much of which is from Monsanto’s glyphosate, and nearly everything sold in conventional food stores contains some form of genetically modified organism,...

read more

BEES ARE DYING OFF – BUT THERE’S A SIMPLE, UNCONTROVERSIAL WAY TO SAVE THEM...

Jun 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The only thing stopping us from protecting pollinators is greed, Dave Goulson tells Salon Lindsay Abrams SALON.COM Bees are dying off — but there’s a surprisingly simple, completely uncontroversial way to save them (Credit: StudioSmart via Shutterstock) The world’s bees are in trouble, and progress in addressing the underlying problems contributing to their demise, from the use of dangerous pesticides to the destruction of their habitat, is painfully slow. But it still isn’t too late, a hopeful, if not terribly optimistic Dave Goulson tells Salon. A professor of biology at the University of Sussex and the founder of the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, Goulson knows better than anyone just how massive the challenges are, but also how capable we are of meeting them — if we only muster the will. His work studying the...

read more

Biotech Giant DuPont-Pioneer Found Guilty of Pesticide Contamination...

May 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] A jury awarded 15 people $500,000 in damages in the latest victory against GE seed corporations in Hawaii. By Paul Towers / Pesticide Action Network North America   VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: tony4urban/Shutterstock Chalk up another win for the little guy. A handful of residents of Kauai’s Waimea community recently prevailed in court over biotech giant DuPont-Pioneer. Citing extensive, harmful dust generated by DuPont’s seed operations, a jury awarded 15 residents $500,000 in damages. This is just the latest in an impressive string of victories against pesticide and genetically engineered (GE) seed corporations in Kaua’i, the global epicenter for GE seed testing. Why the lawsuit? Picture red (pesticide-contaminated) dust blanketing your house and yard, regularly blowing over from neighboring fields, leaving you unable to open your windows or leave your home. That’s what residents...

read more

How Monsanto Could Get Even Bigger and More Powerful...

May 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment We should be very concerned about the future of the world’s food supply. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: prudkov/Shutterstock Earlier this month, Swiss seed and agrochemical company Syngenta rejected Monsanto’s second takeover bid in a year. Syngenta’s board said the offer undervalued the company and did not fully address regulatory risks. But the St. Louis-based biotech giant, the world’s biggest seed seller, is not deterred and is planning a new offer to Syngenta, the world’s biggest pesticide and fertilizer seller. If approved, it would be the biggest agribusiness merger in history. But clearing antitrust regulators in the U.S. and the EU is a big if. The combined behemoth would be the world’s largest seed and crop chemical company with more than $30 billion in revenue and control over 35 percent...

read more

EU Dropped Pesticide Laws Due to U.S. Pressure over TTIP, Documents Reveal...

May 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] U.S. trade officials pushed EU to shelve action on endocrine-disrupting chemicals linked to cancer and male infertility to facilitate TTIP free trade deal. By Arthur Neslen / The Guardian  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: sakhorn/Shutterstock EU moves to regulate hormone-damaging chemicals linked to cancer and male infertility were shelved following pressure from U.S. trade officials over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) free trade deal, newly released documents show. Draft EU criteria could have banned 31 pesticides containing endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). But these were dumped amid fears of a trade backlash stoked by an aggressive U.S. lobby push, access to information documents obtained by Pesticides Action Network (PAN) Europe show. On the morning of July 2, 2013, a high-level delegation from the U.S. Mission to Europe and the American Chambers of Commerce...

read more

U.S. HONEYBEE POPULATION PLUMMETS MORE THAN 40%...

May 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Growing body of evidence points to neonicotinoid pesticides as culprit of massive bee die-offs. By Lorraine Chow / EcoWatch   VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Shaiith/Shutterstock To the horror of beekeepers around the country, it appears that the worrisome decline in honeybees is getting even worse. According to the latest annual government study, U.S. beekeepers reported losing 42.1 percent of the total number of colonies managed from April 2014 through April 2015, much higher than the 34.2 percent from the year prior. The study was conducted by the Bee Informed Partnership in collaboration with the Apiary Inspectors of America and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Preliminary results indicate that U.S. beekeepers were hardest-hit in the summer of 2014, with an average loss of 27.4 percent of their hives compared to the 19.8 percent...

read more

Is the Government Harassing and Censoring Scientists for Studying Ties Between Pesticides and Bee Deaths?...

May 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] “The possibility that the USDA is prioritizing the interests of the chemical industry over those of the American public is unacceptable,” states the letter, which was signed by more than 25 citizens’ groups concerned that a forthcoming report by the White House Task Force on Pollinator Health, which is co-chaired by the USDA, will be compromised. The signatories include the American Bird Conservancy, Avaaz, Center for Biological Diversity, Center for Food Safety, Farmworkers Association of Florida, Food and Water Watch, Friends of the Earth, Green America, Organic Consumers Association and Sierra Club. “It is imperative that the American people can trust that their government and its employees are serving their constituents and not the profits of private companies,” they wrote. “All of the research that the USDA conducts must maintain scientific integrity and...

read more

The Latest Threat to Bees? Flupy...

May 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The government approves a new pesticide called flupyradifurone that environmentalists say threatens wildlife and people.   Just as it was beginning to look like the movement to ban bee-killing pesticides was gaining ground, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved a new pesticide that threatens to be just as toxic. Flupyradifurone, developed by Bayer CropScience under the brand name Sivanto, is a systemic insecticide that kills aphids, whiteflies, mites, and other “sucking pests.” Slated for use on a cornucopia of crops, including fruit and nut trees, grapes, citrus, potatoes, corn, soy, and cotton, Sivanto is poised to be enormously popular with growers eager for a chemical that’s effective against increasingly resistant pests. Environmental experts contend that the chemical’s killing power also poses a threat to bees, beneficial insects, wildlife—and possibly humans. “The research...

read more

After Cesar Chavez: The fight for farmworker rights isn’t over...

Apr 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] U.S. National Archives and Records Administration By Brentin Mock The irony of nonviolent resistance is that it needs violence to be effective. The spectacle of mobs, deputized and otherwise, billy-clubbing people as they turn cheeks until they run out of cheeks to turn, tends to assault the consciences of those observing. Gandhi understood this, as did his acolytes Bayard Rustin and Rev. James M. Lawson Jr., who both brought Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to understand it. A young Chicano farmworker named Cesar Chavez also understood this, and made it a central tenet of his social justice work in the 1960s. Today, many Americans are celebrating Chavez’s birthday to commemorate his hard work in organizing some of the hardest workers in the nation: farmworkers. But 22 years after his death, those who toil in...

read more

New Way to Identify Pesticide-Free, Non-GMO Food...

Mar 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Organic farmers can have their products certified at a cost less than the USDA’s certification program. By Radha McLean / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET Eco-conscious shoppers now have an alternative to organic food that has been certified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as Certified Naturally Grown (CNG). The equally pesticide-free method of farming is being used by a growing number of small farmers who cannot afford the expense of getting an organic certification from the USDA. Naturally grown produce, considered to be the grassroots alternative to certified organic agriculture, requires a national certification by the CNG. The CNG conducts rigorous oversight to assure that all food labeled Certified Naturally Grown is grown without the use of synthetic chemicals or GMOs. “Certified Naturally Grown is like the USDA’s National Organic Program in that our certified producers must...

read more

New Report Shows That The Most Popular Weed-Killer In The U.S. Probably Causes Cancer...

Mar 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Emily AtkinCLIMATE PROGRESS Spraying Monsanto’s herbicide Roundup could cause cancer, the World Health Organization said in a new report. CREDIT: shutterstock The most popular weed-killer in the United States — and possibly the world — “probably” causes cancer, according to a new report from the World Health Organization (WHO). Published Thursday in the journal The Lancet Oncology, the report focuses on a chemical called glyphosate, invented by Monsanto back in 1974 as a broad-spectrum herbicide. It’s the active ingredient in Roundup, a popular product used mostly in commercial agriculture production. Roundup is particularly good for genetically modified crops, which can be bred to resist damage from the product while it kills the weeds surrounding it. Roundup, shown here, includes a chemical that could be carcinogenic to humans. CREDIT: Shutterstock In the U.S.,...

read more

Are shrooms the new pesticide?

Mar 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Endophytic fungi growing between tall fescue cells    Nick Hill Fungal fever By Nathanael Johnson Scientists in Ireland have found that growing fungus inside barley helps the plants ward off disease. Brian Murphy, a botanist at Trinity College Dublin, has also shown that an inoculation of fungus allows plants to thrive in harsh conditions. ClimateWire, which has a nice write-up here, quoted Murphy explaining that the fungal treatment helped when plants were exposed to drought, stress, and disease all at once: “We found fantastic benefits,” he said. “We hit these plants with them all at the same time, and we really made them suffer. The plants treated with [fungi] had six times the survival rate as those without. It’s literally the difference between life and death.” If this technology pans out, it could replace pesticides in some...

read more

BUYERS BEWARE: The 12 most pesticide-contaminated fruits and vegetables...

Feb 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] If you’re going to buy organic, start with apples, peaches and nectarines Lindsay Abrams  SALON.COM Buyers beware: The 12 most pesticide-contaminated fruits and vegetables (Credit: yevgeniy11/Shutterstock) The Environmental Working Group is out, once again, with its annual “Dirty Dozen” guide to the conventionally grown produce most likely to be contaminated with pesticides. Apples, again, top the list, which is based on an analysis of over 3,000 produce samples tested by the USDA in 2013 and ranked according to several metrics, including the amount and variety of pesticides found on each type of fruit and vegetable. Newly prominent, and coming in second and third place, are peaches and nectarines. Those fruits tend to be the “dirtiest,” EWG analysts explained, because they’re often treated with chemicals both before and after harvest, in order to preserve...

read more

BEE DECLINE COULD CAUSE MALNUTRITION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES...

Jan 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Al Behrman Many people in developing nations already face a range of challenges, including poverty, pollution, and climate change that’s helping make droughts longer and storms more intense. But according to a new study, residents of developing nations could also soon be struggling with something else: malnutrition fueled by the decline of pollinators around the world. The study, published this month in the journal PLOS ONE, looked at dietary surveys from women and children in parts of Zambia, Uganda, Mozambique, and Bangladesh. The University of Vermont and Harvard University researchers calculated what percentage of five nutrients — vitamin A, zinc, iron, folate, and calcium — in the women and children’s diets came from foods that are heavily dependent on pollinators (crops such as cocoa and Brazil...

read more

“Dude, why didn’t you just sue these people?”: Portrait of an environmental whistleblower...

Jan 19, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Salon speaks with embattled biologist Tyrone Hayes, subject of a new mini-documentary by Jonathan Demme Lindsay Abrams SALON.COM Topics: “Dude, why didn’t you just sue these people?”: Portrait of an environmental whistleblowerTyrone Hayes in “The New Yorker Presents” (Credit: Amazon/The New Yorker) In an era where scientists are eyed with suspicion and science itself is treated as something to be debated by politicians and industry lobbyists, the last thing you’d ever want to be is the researcher whose findings conflict with corporate interests. You might find yourself followed, your reputation dismantled, your very well-being threatened — all of which happened to University of California-Berkeley biologist Tyrone Hayes when he discovered that atrazine, one of our most commonly used herbicides, might be causing gender and reproductive deformities in frogs, with potential implications for human...

read more

Will We Be Able to Save the Monarch Butterfly?...

Dec 31, 2014 Posted by

[Translate] The Monarch Butterfly May Soon Be Protected By The U.S. Endangered Species Act Reuters By Laura Zuckerman (Reuters) – Monarch butterflies may warrant U.S. Endangered Species Act protection because of farm-related habitat loss blamed for sharp declines in cross-country migrations of the orange-and-black insects, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said on Monday. Monarch populations are estimated to have fallen by as much as 90 percent during the past two decades because of destruction of milkweed plants they depend on to lay their eggs and nourish hatching larvae, according to the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. The loss of the plant is tied to factors such as increased cultivation of crops genetically engineered to withstand herbicides that kill native vegetation, including milkweed, the conservation group says. Monarchs, unique among butterflies for the regularity...

read more

2014 was stuffed with good food news that you never heard about...

Dec 28, 2014 Posted by

[Translate] Adelina W By Nathanael Johnson  GRIST The food movement has done a great job winning the hearts and minds of eaters, but not such a great job moving the economic and political levers that shape our food system. For that reason, it can seem as if nothing ever changes. If you’re watching the high-profile debates (cough, GMOs), that’s true: The same people make the same arguments over and over, resulting in a robust stalemate. But there is real change happening in areas that I contend are even more important than the most popular and highly covered food fights. Here’s my year-end list of ways the food system changed for the better (mostly) in 2014, along with some predictions for next year. Deforestation Shutterstock This has been a banner year for the campaign against...

read more

Sick, Poisoned and Hungry: The Bees of New York State...

Dec 15, 2014 Posted by

[Translate] Caledonia Spirits is a craft distillery nestled in the sparsely populated northeastern corner of Vermont. The company’s founder, Todd Hardie, has tended honeybees for decades. He began the practice almost 50 years ago, when he was 12, and began dabbling in the practice on the family farm.As a result, Caledonia Spirits’ signature liquors, gin and vodka, contain a mellow undertone of honey: The company uses about 100 barrels a year, at 640 pounds a barrel (about six pounds of honey goes into each bottle of vodka).Hardie’s business is thriving, but talk with him about the bees and he sounds distinctly depressed. Although he still keeps some hives, they are no longer his principal business. It simply doesn’t make economic sense. Where once he managed to get 95 percent of the bees through the...

read more

Pesticide use by farmers linked to high rates of depression, suicides...

Oct 14, 2014 Posted by

[Translate] Ginnie Peters Matt Peters, a fourth-generation farmer in Dallas County, Iowa, took his own life in May 2011. The Peters family lives on this farm surrounded by 1,500 acres of fields. By Brian Bienkowski Staff Writer Environmental Health News   On his farm in Iowa, Matt Peters worked from dawn to dusk planting his 1,500 acres of fields with pesticide-treated seeds. “Every spring I worried about him,” said his wife, Ginnie. “Every spring I was glad when we were done.” Ginnie Peters Matt Peters left behind his wife, Ginnie, and two children. In the spring of 2011, Ginnie Peters’ “calm, rational, loving” husband suddenly became depressed and agitated. “He told me ‘I feel paralyzed’,” she said. “He couldn’t sleep or think. Out of nowhere he was depressed.” A clinical psychologist spoke to him...

read more

California May Heavily Restrict Pesticide Chlorpyrifos, Which Sickened Dozens In Recent Years...

Sep 29, 2014 Posted by

[Translate]  | By SCOTT SMITH  HUFFINGTON POST Posted: 09/25/2014 6:30 pm EDT Updated: 09/26/2014 8:59 am EDT FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — California farmers who spray a widely used insecticide on some of the state’s most abundant crops may soon have to overcome the nation’s steepest restrictions or find another pest killer, officials said Thursday. Regulators are proposing heavy restrictions — but not an all-out ban — on chlorpyrifos, used to treat crops like grapes and almonds. The pesticide, in use since 1965, has sickened dozens of farmworkers in recent years. Traces have been found in waterways, threatening fish, and regulators say overuse could make targeted insects immune to the pesticide. “We’ve come up with a clear idea of when it’s really needed and what are the alternatives,” said Brian Leahy, director of the California Department...

read more

The Weird And Wonderful World Of Indoor Farming...

Jul 10, 2014 Posted by

[Translate] By Annie-Rose Strasser CLIMATE PROGRESS In an unassuming industrial park on a flat landscape, off a service road lined with short trees and a clear view of I-94’s route through Indiana, sits a standard-looking, Grade A industrial building with a grey facade and very few windows. While it looks just like any industrial park, anywhere in the U.S., inside of this particular one is a small wonder. Walk inside, through the unfurnished offices, and you’ll enter a vast room — 120 feet by 120 feet, 30 feet tall — full of towers of giant tubs, where everything is glowing pink. Welcome to Green Sense Farms. “Green Sense Farms is the largest commercial indoor vertical farm in the U.S,” explains Robert Colangelo, the company’s founding farmer. “We’re also the largest user of LED grow...

read more

Bee-Ware! Everything we know about neonic pesticides is awful...

Jun 26, 2014 Posted by

[Translate]   Bee-ware! By John Upton Shutterstock Neonicotinoid pesticides are great at killing insect pests, which helps to explain the dramatic rise in their use during the past 20 years. They’re popular because they are systemic pesticides — they don’t just get sprayed onto plant surfaces. They can be applied to seeds, roots, and soil, becoming incorporated into a growing plant, turning it into poison for any bugs that might munch upon it. But using neonics to control pests is like using a hand grenade to thwart a bank robbery. Which is why the European Union has banned the use of many of them – and why environmentalists are suing the U.S. EPA to do the same. The pesticides don’t just affect pest species. Most prominently, they affect bees and butterflies, which are poisoned when they gather...

read more

GMO companies are dousing Hawaiian island with toxic pesticides...

Jun 16, 2014 Posted by

[Translate] The Kauai Cocktail By Paul Koberstein Shutterstock WAIMEA, HAWAII — The island of Kauai, Hawaii, has become Ground Zero in the intense domestic political battle over genetically modified crops. But the fight isn’t just about the merits or downsides of GMO technology. It’s also about regular old pesticides. The four transnational corporations that are experimenting with genetically engineered crops on Kauai have transformed part of the island into one of most toxic chemical environments in all of American agriculture. For the better part of two decades, BASF Plant Science, Dow AgroSciences, DuPont Pioneer, and Syngenta have been drenching their test crops near the small town of Waimea on the southwest coast of Kauai with some of the most dangerous synthetic pesticides in use in agriculture today, at an intensity that far surpasses the...

read more