CLIMATE CHANGE IS DRIVING OCEAN OXYGEN LEVELS DOWN, AND THAT’S A BIG PROBLEM FOR MARINE ECOSYSTEMS...

Apr 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] BY KATIE VALENTINE – CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: shutterstock   Scientists know that climate change is slowly robbing the oceans of their oxygen, but historically, it’s been hard to differentiate oxygen loss that’s due to natural ocean cycles and warming-driven loss. Now, a new study predicts that within the next 15 to 25 years, warming-caused oxygen loss will be detectable across the worlds’ oceans. The study, published in Global Biogeochemical Cycles, used modelling to determine that, between 2030 and 2040, warming-caused oxygen loss will be severe enough — and data will be comprehensive enough — for scientists to see what parts of the ocean are being affected by human-caused deoxygenation. “Oxygen varies naturally in the ocean quite substantially,” Matthew Long, lead author of the study and scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research....

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U.S.-CANADA PACT ERASES ARCTIC FEARS...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Valerie Brown / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG   The Trans-Alaska pipeline runs 800 miles from the Arctic Ocean to the Gulf of Alaska. (Luca Galuzzi via Wikimedia Commons) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. OREGON—A joint pledge by the US and Canada to reduce methane emissions for oil and gas activities in the Arctic and limit fossil fuel extraction is putting pressure on Russia to follow suit. The pledge was in response to increasing concern across the world at the intention of the eight nations with territorial claims in the Arctic to exploit its resources, even though this risks making climate change far worse. At the poles, the Earth is warming twice as fast as the global average. In the Arctic, this is disrupting the way of life...

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SIGNS OF THE ‘HUMAN AGE’...

Apr 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By NICHOLAS ST. FLEUR  NYTDOT   Welcome to the “Anthropocene” — a new epoch in our planet’s 4.5 billion year history. Thanks to the colossal changes humans have made since the mid-20th century, Earth has now entered a distinct age from the Holocene epoch, which started 11,700 years ago as the ice age thawed. That’s according to an argument made by a team of scientists from the Anthropocene Working Group. Scientists say an epoch ends following an event – like the asteroid that demolished the dinosaurs and ended the late Cretaceous Epoch 66 million years ago – that altered the underlying rock and sedimentary layers so significantly that its remnants can be observed across the globe. In a paper published Thursday in Science, the researchers presented evidence for why they think mankind’s...

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Infographic: How Ocean Pollution Impacts Marine Life—and All of Us...

Apr 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Much of the plastic we produce ends up in the ocean, where it kills fish, sea turtles and marine mammals. By Torben Lonne / AlterNet Environmental Pollution – A discarded white plastic bags drifts over a tropical coral reef Photo Credit: Richard Whitcombe/Shutterstock The world’s oceans are a magical, diverse and abundant ecosystem that mankind needs in order to survive. The oceans cover over 72 percent of the planet’s surface, provide over 97 percent of the world’s water supply and over 70 percent of the oxygen we breathe. We have so much to thank the oceans for; however, they are threatened daily by natural and manmade pollution. Ocean pollution comes in many forms, but the largest factor affecting the oceans is plastic. Over the last decade, we have produced more plastic than...

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SHRIMP SOUND OCEAN ACIDITY ALARM...

Apr 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     The snapping shrimp is the noisiest marine creature in coastal ecosystems. (Tullio Ross/University of Adelaide) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The slow change in water chemistry as more and more atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolves in the sea and causes acidification could make the oceans much less noisy and slow the growth of life at the sea’s margins. In one study, Australian scientists warn that as the acidity levels grow, the snapping shrimp may grow ever quieter. And in another study, Californian scientists have tested the water chemistry in coastal rock pools and discovered that they become most corrosive at night. The snapping shrimp is the loudest invertebrate in the ocean. It forms bubbles in its snapping claw and...

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THE ICY FIRE BENEATH NORWAY’S SEABED...

Apr 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] HUFFINGTON POST   Randall Hyman Arctic Deeply Randall Hyman Marine biologist Peter Linke, GEOMAR engineers and deckhands guide a specially-designed lander (commissioned by Norway’s Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate (CAGE)) over the edge of RV Helmer Hanssen to begin a one-year seafloor mission monitoring marine methane off west coast of Spitsbergen, Svalbard archipelago, Norway. Trapped by deep ocean pressure and cold temperatures along continental shelves, methane hydrates could be an energy windfall or a looming disaster. Norway is spending millions to discover whether this ice-like form of natural gas will prove boon or bane. The landers lashed to the aft deck of the R/V Helmer Hanssen held firm as waves crashed into the ship. The two golf-cart-sized crafts, stocked with scientific instruments, appeared ready for planetary exploration, but in a...

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NOT A FISH TALE: HUMANS ARE INGESTING PLASTIC THANKS TO OCEAN POLLUTION...

Mar 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Dahr Jamail, Truthout | Report (Photo: Plastic Bag via Shutterstock; Edited: LW / TO) Humans generate more than 300 million tons of plastic annually — an amount equal to the combined body weight of the entire global adult human population — and nearly half of the plastic is only used one time before it is tossed away to eventually find its way to the oceans. So it should come as little surprise that by 2050, it is a virtual certainty that every seabird on the planet will have plastic in its stomach. Recent estimates indicate that upwards of 8 million tons of plastic are added to the planet’s oceans every year, the equivalent of a dump truck full of plastic every minute. That is enough plastic to have led one scientist...

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OVERFISHING IS AS BIG A THREAT TO HUMANITY AS IT IS TO OUR OCEANS...

Mar 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE GUARDIAN As market leader John West commits to sustainably sourced tuna, WWF Australia CEO says the move will drive fishery reform, helping to provide food security for Pacific islanders as well as save vulnerable marine species A fisherman in the Philippines with a tuna catch. John West Australia has joined forces with WWF and the Marine Stewardship Council to source only sustainable tuna. Photograph: Jürgen Freund/WWF Australia Dermot O’Gorman is the CEO of World Wildlife Fund Australia     There has never been a more urgent time for seafood businesses and fishing nations to make a commitment to sustainability. The world’s oceans are in trouble, with marine life plummeting and the people who are dependent on the sea for income and food left increasingly vulnerable. Data shows populations of fish and other...

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TO CUT OCEAN TRASH, ADRIAN GRENIER AND DELL ENLIST FILMMAKERS AND VIRTUAL REALITY...

Mar 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  NYTDOT Andrew C. Revkin   Photo Two scenes from a virtual-reality “ride” that takes viewers into the realm of whales, fish and sonic and plastic pollution.Credit Dell On a weekend visit to South by Southwest, the annual Austin festival focused on the intersection of ideas, technology, music and film, I ran into Adrian Grenier, who’s best known as an actor but is building a career as a filmmaker and campaigner with a focus on the environment. Photo Adrian Grenier shows off a 3-D virtual reality ocean journey at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Tex.Credit Courtesy of Dell Grenier, who last year signed on as the “social good advocate” for Dell, was there with the company’s sustainability and supply-chain directors and a remarkable virtual-reality “ride,” for lack of a better description, in...

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“REASON WITH WATER RATHER THAN REPEL IT” ARCHITECTS TAKE ON BOSTON’S WATERY FUTURE...

Mar 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]            Detail of “The Omega Chain,” a finalist selected in the infrastructure category. (Credit: Howard & Cavaluzzi Architects Int. LLC.) Henry Grabar  SALON.COM   In one vision of Boston, a network of canals fills and empties with tides and storm surges. Water is drawn through sluices with embedded, hydroelectric turbines, generating power. In another, an aquatic park snakes around an urban island fortified with terraced steps that keep the ocean in sight but out of reach. These are two of the nine finalists in Living With Water, a competition to redesign Boston for the year 2100, with the assumption that sea levels are 5 feet higher than today. For many coast-dwellers, that prospect is an existential threat so serious that it’s better not to think of it at all. Collectively, the ideas from...

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MASSIVE ALGAL BLOOM KILLS MILLIONS OF SALMON IN CHILE...

Mar 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File   A deadly algal bloom has killed nearly 23 million fish in Chile, the world’s second-largest exporter of salmon, causing widespread economic losses that could cost the country $800 million. According to government officials, there are enough dead fish to fill 14 Olympic-sized swimming pools, and losses could account for as much as 15 percent of Chile’s total annual salmon production. Abnormally high ocean temperatures fueled by one of the strongest El Niños in recorded history has helped the algal bloom flourish off of the Chilean coast, impacting 37 of the 415 salmon farms located either directly in the ocean or in estuaries, according to Reuters. The loss is likely equivalent to somewhere between 15 and 20 percent of Chile’s total production...

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The U.S. Has Approved Industrial Aquaculture in Deep Offshore Waters for the First Time — and It’s a Huge Step Backwards...

Mar 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] If the U.S. public had known the extent of harms that industrial agriculture would cause, we would have never allowed it to become the norm. By George Kimbrell, Sylvia Wu, Cristina Stella / Center for Food Safety VIA ALTERNET   Aquaculture Photo Credit: shutterstock The tragedy of industrial agriculture, the unwise adoption of inherently unsustainable forms of food production over the past generation, has cost us dearly in environmental destruction and public health. From millions of acres of monocultured, genetically engineered, pesticide-promoting crops to inhumane and filthy, water-and-air-polluting Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs), the dominant paradigm for current crop and animal production on land in the United States relies on intensive and toxic inputs. These include animal feed and feed additives, antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals, and pesticides and other synthetic chemicals, which have irreparably damaged our farmlands and native...

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Why Innovative Tech Solutions to Clean Up Oceanic Plastic Trash Are Simply Not Enough...

Feb 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment To truly put a stop to this eco-disaster, we have to stop treating plastics — a material made to last for years — as a throwaway commodity. By Anja Krieger / Ensia  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Rich Carey/Shutterstock.com February 1, 2016 — A few palm trees stand strong in the salty breeze. Located on the southern tip of the Pacific island chain of Hawaii, Kamilo Beach is an isolated stretch of black volcanic shoreline in the middle of nowhere. Just a few hundred yards from shore, humpback whales rise up from the depths, colorful fish fill the reefs and rare sea turtles swim in to nest on the beach. But even in this remote place, garbage washes ashore each day. “We find a lot of toothbrushes and combs, plastic bottles and caps, over...

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OCEAN ACIDIFICATION IS SLOWING CORAL REEF GROWTH...

Feb 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Ken Caldeira Reef flat study site at One Tree Reef, Australia.   High levels of carbon dioxide in the world’s oceans are likely slowing down coral growth, according to a new study. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, looked at One Tree Reef in the southern Great Barrier Reef. Researchers pumped a sodium hydroxide solution over the reef that lowered the acidity of the water, bringing the alkalinity close to the level it would have been in pre-industrial times, when atmospheric and oceanic carbon dioxide levels were far lower than they are today. They measured the growth rate of the reef under these conditions, and found that corals calcified — took in calcium and carbonate from the water to create their skeletons — at a...

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WARMING OCEANS ARE TURNING SEA STARS TO GOO AND KILLING LOBSTERS, SCIENTISTS SA...

Feb 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Darryl Fears  THE WASHINGTON POST British Columbia. The species has all but disappeared there. (Neil McDaniel) Warming waters in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans have increased the prevalence of diseases that are turning sea stars to mush and killing lobsters by burrowing under their shells and causing lesions, two new studies say. The outbreaks are so lethal, according to a biologist involved in both studies, that at least one species of sea star has vanished off the coasts of Washington and British Columbia and the lobster fishery, already decimated in southern New England, will likely be threatened in Maine. In the Pacific, a wasting disease is blamed for the disappearance of the technicolor sunflower sea star. It’s also laying waste to the ochre sea star that scientists at Cornell University, the University...

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2016 ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE RANKINGS SHOW PROGRESS AND FAILURE...

Feb 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT   by Jared Green Deforestation in Brazil / Wired Yale University and Columbia University, together with the World Economic Forum, have released the 2016 Environmental Performance Index (EPI), which tracks how well countries protect human health and ecosystems. According to their analysis, “nearly every country” has improved their “environmental performance” on 20 different indicators over the past decade, while land and marine ecosystems only continue to decline. Countries in Western Europe and North America, which already have fairly high scores, now focus on incremental improvements, but are still gaining, while even China and India have shown significant improvements from 2006. Still, the problems facing both people and ecosystems are massive. More than 3.5 billion people — half of the world’s population — live in countries with “unsafe” air quality, and around...

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Incredible Infographic Shows How We Have Ruined Our Oceans — and Ourselves as a Result...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment From plastic trash and discarded fishing gear to oil spills and pesticide runoff, human beings have treated the oceans as a vast dumping ground. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: Fotos593/Shutterstock.com The oceans cover more than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface and contain 97 percent of the Earth’s water. But they remain largely a mystery to us. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, less than five percent of the world’s oceans have been explored. It has often been said that we know more about the moon than we do the oceans. But one thing we do know about the oceans is that they are getting more and more polluted. From plastic trash and discarded fishing gear to oil spills and pesticide runoff, human beings have treated the oceans...

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STUDY SHOWS CORAL REEFS CAN BE ‘INCREDIBLY RESILIENT’ TO WARMING EVENTS...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)   D Coral reefs have had a tough time in the last two decades as warming temperatures, overfishing, chemical runoff, and disease have sparked massive coral die-offs. But reefs in the Indian Ocean show that substantial recovery is possible, a study released Wednesday found. The study, published in Scientific Reports, looks at 28 reefs in the remote Chagos Archipelago, an area that lost 90 percent of its corals in 1998 after an unprecedented rise in sea temperatures. Nearly 20 years later, coral reefs there are back to optimum health, demonstrating that reefs can bounce back “rapidly” from major climate-driven disturbances. [The] coral cover was absolutely wonderful. I mean stunningly beautiful Researchers interviewed said the study is another example of how proper management...

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Incredible Infographic Shows How We Have Ruined Our Oceans — and Ourselves as a Result...

Nov 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment From plastic trash and discarded fishing gear to oil spills and pesticide runoff, human beings have treated the oceans as a vast dumping ground. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: Fotos593/Shutterstock.com The oceans cover more than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface and contain 97 percent of the Earth’s water. But they remain largely a mystery to us. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, less than five percent of the world’s oceans have been explored. It has often been said that we know more about the moon than we do the oceans. But one thing we do know about the oceans is that they are getting more and more polluted. From plastic trash and discarded fishing gear to oil spills and pesticide runoff, human beings have treated the oceans...

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HOW WASHINGTON TRANSFORMED ITS DYING OYSTER INDUSTRY INTO A CLIMATE SUCCESS STORY...

Oct 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Wikimedia Netarts Bay, in Oregon, where Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery is located.   When Alan Barton first arrived at Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery in 2007, he wasn’t expecting to stay very long. The hatchery — the second-largest in the United States — was in trouble, suffering from historically high mortality rates for their microscopic oyster larvae. But Barton knew that in the oyster industry, trouble is just another part of the job. As manager of the oyster breeding program at Oregon State University, he had already helped one oyster larvae breeding operation navigate through some tough years in 2005, when a bacterial infection appeared to be causing problems for their seeds. To combat the issue, he had created a treatment system that could remove vibrio tubiashii, an...

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SUSTAINABLE OCEAN FARMING INNOVATORS WIN THE 2015 BUCKMINSTER FULLER CHALLENGE...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Design by Lucy Wang INHABITAT The Buckminster Fuller Institute just crowned the non-profit GreenWave winner of the 2015 Fuller Challenge for developing the world’s first multi-species 3D ocean farms – a type of sustainable aquaculture that produces high yields while restoring and improving the ocean’s ecosystems. The non-profit will receive a $100,000 grand prize towards the implementation of their work. Our oceans are being plundered. With recent studies suggesting that humans have caused marine populations to halve, largely due to overfishing, alternative solutions like those proposed by GreenWave are a lifeline to the billions of people who depend on the oceans’ biodiversity. GreenWave’s new approach to farming the seas rejects the traditional practice of growing vulnerable monocultures for a multi-layered system akin to a vertical underwater garden. GreenWave’s open-source strategy takes advantage of...

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THE THIRD RECORDED GLOBAL CORAL BLEACHING EVENT MAY BE UNDERWAY...

Sep 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   A marine biologist assesses the bleaching at Airport Reef in American Samoa. This image is available for free use to communicate about the global bleaching event. Image: XL Catlin Seaview Survey By Andrew Freedman CLIMATE PROGRESS Coral reefs around the world — from Hawaii to the iconic Great Barrier Reef, eastward all the way to the Bahamas and beyond — are in jeopardy of being severely damaged or even dying because of a dangerous spike in ocean temperatures, scientists say. Conditions are so dire that, provided coral bleaching soon spreads from the Florida Keys to the Bahamas, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is expected to declare as soon as two weeks from now that the third global coral bleaching event is here. There’s already evidence of coral bleaching in three major...

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HOW NANOTECHNOLOGY COULD FIGHT CARBON DIOXIDE POLLUTION IN THE OCEAN...

Sep 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Kif Leswing    FUTURISM In Brief Nanoengineers have developed new micromotors that can convert carbon dioxide into a solid. The Breakthrough Micromotors were able to remove 90 precent of carbon dioxide in certain ionised water solutions. The success rate was 88 percent in seawater. The resulting product is simple calcium carbonate, which is commonly found in seashells and coral. However, the bots require a flow of hydrogen peroxide, which is used to propel them forward. The Implications But despite future hurdles, these bots are exciting — they can travel 100 micrometers per second, and there are hope that they can be used as part of a water treatment system. Read more at:...

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CRISIS IN GLOBAL OCEANS AS POPULATIONS OF MARINE SPECIES HALVE IN SIZE SINCE 1970...

Sep 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TRUTHDIG Marine species around the world, including populations of fish critical to human food security, are in potentially catastrophic decline according to research published today. WWF’s Living Blue Planet report, an updated study of marine mammals, birds, reptiles and fish, shows a decline of 49 per cent in the size of marine populations between 1970 and 2012. As well as being disastrous for ecosystems, these findings spell trouble for all nations, especially people in the developing world who depend heavily on the ocean’s resources.   Many species essential to commercial and subsistence fishing – and therefore global food supply – are significantly depleted due to over fishing.  Global population sizes of the Scombridae family of food fish that includes tunas, mackerels and bonitos have fallen by 74 per cent.  Declining stocks of bluefin...

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SOUTHERN OCEAN STARTS TO SOAK UP CARBON AGAIN...

Sep 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     A research vessel plows through the waves of the Southern Ocean, also known as the Antarctic Ocean, to measure levels of dissolved carbon dioxide. (Nicolas Metzl, LOCEAN/IPSL Laboratory) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The high seas have begun to respond again to the changes in the atmosphere, with two new studies confirming that the Southern Ocean is absorbing more atmospheric carbon. Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have been steadily increasing as humans burn ever more fossil fuels, but climate scientists will probably hesitate before exhaling sighs of relief over the latest findings. Rising CO2 in the atmosphere means global warming, which means climate change, melting ice caps, rising sea levels—and even more global warming and...

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CLEAN ENERGY PLANS MAY INCREASE TOXINS IN PLANKTON...

Sep 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Alex Kirby, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Harnessing the power of Muskrat Falls to produce hydroelectricity could be damaging for indigenous communities. (innovationtrail via Flickr) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Scientists in the US think they may now have the explanation to a conundrum that has puzzled them for a long time—why there are high levels of methylmercury, which can damage the nervous system, in Arctic marine life. The answer, they report, appears to be one of those examples of worsening a problem by trying to solve it: human attempts to mitigate climate change have inadvertently altered the eating habits of Arctic plankton. Researchers from the Harvard John A.Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggest...

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DUTCH STUDENT DESIGNS OCEAN CLEANUP ARRAY...

Sep 2, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]         the ocean cleanup array won the 2015 INDEX: award due its potential to address one the largest global challenges. the innovative and well-researched idea by 21-year-old dutch engineering student boyan slat, will greatly improve the condition of the earth’s greatest natural resource, as well as the lives of millions. ‘we live in a plastic age and we’ve already recognised a number of global challenges related to the oceans,’ explains index: award jury member katinka von der lippe, strategic design, aestethics & design management at eker design/hydrolift. ‘it’s about time we’re serious about a resource that makes up over 70% of the world’s surface.’ a rendered image of the plastic collection platform         the solution will not only have tremendous benefits for the environment and biodiversity, but will improve...

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TOO WARM, TOO FEW FISH: HEALTH WARNING FOR WORLD’S OCEANS...

Aug 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Kieran Cooke, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Overfishing compounds ocean damage from climate change. (John Wallace / NOAA via Wikimedia Commons) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The world’s oceans—covering nearly two-thirds of the Earth’s surface, and on which much of human life depends—are under severe pressure, a report says. Over-fishing has dramatically reduced fish stocks. The thousands of tonnes of rubbish dumped in the oceans wreak havoc on marine life, while climate change is warming and acidifying them, putting them under further stress. These are the sobering conclusions of a wide-ranging study of the Earth’s ecosystems by the Worldwatch Institute, a US-based organisation widely rated as one of the world’s foremost environmental think-tanks. “Our sense of the ocean’s power and omnipotence—combined with scientific ignorance—contributed to...

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WE’RE MAKING MASSIVE WASTE ISLANDS IN THE SEA...

Aug 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] We’re making massive waste islands in the seahttps://youtu.be/mMG1SdeYLFE By Clayton Aldern  GRIST https://youtu.be/mMG1SdeYLFE That message in a bottle you tossed into the sea as a youngrapscallion? Remember how you didn’t get a response? It’s because oceans aren’t the same thing as carrier pigeons. Instead of sending bottles bobbing merrily on their way across the Pacific, ocean currents tend to push bits of trash to convergence points in the ocean called garbage patches.The video above shows a new data visualization from NASA illustrating the phenomenon. By mapping the paths of free-floating ocean buoys distributed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration over a period of 35 years, scientists were able to verify the garbage patch effect, as well as the locations of the patches. Aside from providing these insights, the visualization is a win...

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AN UNDERSEA VOLCANO PREVIEWS A TERRIFYING FUTURE FOR THE WORLD’S OCEANS...

Aug 13, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Scientists discover an area in the South Pacific where high levels of carbon dioxide have created dead zones where healthy coral reefs should be. Algae-covered habitats dominate areas of Maug Island, in the Pacific Ocean, closest to underwater volcanic vents that spew carbon dioxide. (Photo: Stephani Gordon/Open Boat Films/NOAA) Aug 12, 2015 Emily J. Gertz is TakePart’s associate editor for environment and wildlife. Bio In a remote area of the South Pacific, nature has opened a window on the most likely future for the world’s tropical coral reefs unless nations radically cut fossil fuel emissions. It’s not a pretty picture. Rather than “a very healthy reef full of diverse coral communities” including hundreds of fish, said marine biologist Ian Enochs, there’s just a thick carpet of green fuzz along with...

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