Incredible Infographic Shows How We Have Ruined Our Oceans — and Ourselves as a Result...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment From plastic trash and discarded fishing gear to oil spills and pesticide runoff, human beings have treated the oceans as a vast dumping ground. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: Fotos593/Shutterstock.com The oceans cover more than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface and contain 97 percent of the Earth’s water. But they remain largely a mystery to us. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, less than five percent of the world’s oceans have been explored. It has often been said that we know more about the moon than we do the oceans. But one thing we do know about the oceans is that they are getting more and more polluted. From plastic trash and discarded fishing gear to oil spills and pesticide runoff, human beings have treated the oceans...

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STUDY SHOWS CORAL REEFS CAN BE ‘INCREDIBLY RESILIENT’ TO WARMING EVENTS...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)   D Coral reefs have had a tough time in the last two decades as warming temperatures, overfishing, chemical runoff, and disease have sparked massive coral die-offs. But reefs in the Indian Ocean show that substantial recovery is possible, a study released Wednesday found. The study, published in Scientific Reports, looks at 28 reefs in the remote Chagos Archipelago, an area that lost 90 percent of its corals in 1998 after an unprecedented rise in sea temperatures. Nearly 20 years later, coral reefs there are back to optimum health, demonstrating that reefs can bounce back “rapidly” from major climate-driven disturbances. [The] coral cover was absolutely wonderful. I mean stunningly beautiful Researchers interviewed said the study is another example of how proper management...

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Incredible Infographic Shows How We Have Ruined Our Oceans — and Ourselves as a Result...

Nov 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment From plastic trash and discarded fishing gear to oil spills and pesticide runoff, human beings have treated the oceans as a vast dumping ground. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: Fotos593/Shutterstock.com The oceans cover more than 70 percent of the Earth’s surface and contain 97 percent of the Earth’s water. But they remain largely a mystery to us. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, less than five percent of the world’s oceans have been explored. It has often been said that we know more about the moon than we do the oceans. But one thing we do know about the oceans is that they are getting more and more polluted. From plastic trash and discarded fishing gear to oil spills and pesticide runoff, human beings have treated the oceans...

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HOW WASHINGTON TRANSFORMED ITS DYING OYSTER INDUSTRY INTO A CLIMATE SUCCESS STORY...

Oct 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Wikimedia Netarts Bay, in Oregon, where Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery is located.   When Alan Barton first arrived at Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery in 2007, he wasn’t expecting to stay very long. The hatchery — the second-largest in the United States — was in trouble, suffering from historically high mortality rates for their microscopic oyster larvae. But Barton knew that in the oyster industry, trouble is just another part of the job. As manager of the oyster breeding program at Oregon State University, he had already helped one oyster larvae breeding operation navigate through some tough years in 2005, when a bacterial infection appeared to be causing problems for their seeds. To combat the issue, he had created a treatment system that could remove vibrio tubiashii, an...

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SUSTAINABLE OCEAN FARMING INNOVATORS WIN THE 2015 BUCKMINSTER FULLER CHALLENGE...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Design by Lucy Wang INHABITAT The Buckminster Fuller Institute just crowned the non-profit GreenWave winner of the 2015 Fuller Challenge for developing the world’s first multi-species 3D ocean farms – a type of sustainable aquaculture that produces high yields while restoring and improving the ocean’s ecosystems. The non-profit will receive a $100,000 grand prize towards the implementation of their work. Our oceans are being plundered. With recent studies suggesting that humans have caused marine populations to halve, largely due to overfishing, alternative solutions like those proposed by GreenWave are a lifeline to the billions of people who depend on the oceans’ biodiversity. GreenWave’s new approach to farming the seas rejects the traditional practice of growing vulnerable monocultures for a multi-layered system akin to a vertical underwater garden. GreenWave’s open-source strategy takes advantage of...

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THE THIRD RECORDED GLOBAL CORAL BLEACHING EVENT MAY BE UNDERWAY...

Sep 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   A marine biologist assesses the bleaching at Airport Reef in American Samoa. This image is available for free use to communicate about the global bleaching event. Image: XL Catlin Seaview Survey By Andrew Freedman CLIMATE PROGRESS Coral reefs around the world — from Hawaii to the iconic Great Barrier Reef, eastward all the way to the Bahamas and beyond — are in jeopardy of being severely damaged or even dying because of a dangerous spike in ocean temperatures, scientists say. Conditions are so dire that, provided coral bleaching soon spreads from the Florida Keys to the Bahamas, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is expected to declare as soon as two weeks from now that the third global coral bleaching event is here. There’s already evidence of coral bleaching in three major...

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HOW NANOTECHNOLOGY COULD FIGHT CARBON DIOXIDE POLLUTION IN THE OCEAN...

Sep 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Kif Leswing    FUTURISM In Brief Nanoengineers have developed new micromotors that can convert carbon dioxide into a solid. The Breakthrough Micromotors were able to remove 90 precent of carbon dioxide in certain ionised water solutions. The success rate was 88 percent in seawater. The resulting product is simple calcium carbonate, which is commonly found in seashells and coral. However, the bots require a flow of hydrogen peroxide, which is used to propel them forward. The Implications But despite future hurdles, these bots are exciting — they can travel 100 micrometers per second, and there are hope that they can be used as part of a water treatment system. Read more at:...

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CRISIS IN GLOBAL OCEANS AS POPULATIONS OF MARINE SPECIES HALVE IN SIZE SINCE 1970...

Sep 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TRUTHDIG Marine species around the world, including populations of fish critical to human food security, are in potentially catastrophic decline according to research published today. WWF’s Living Blue Planet report, an updated study of marine mammals, birds, reptiles and fish, shows a decline of 49 per cent in the size of marine populations between 1970 and 2012. As well as being disastrous for ecosystems, these findings spell trouble for all nations, especially people in the developing world who depend heavily on the ocean’s resources.   Many species essential to commercial and subsistence fishing – and therefore global food supply – are significantly depleted due to over fishing.  Global population sizes of the Scombridae family of food fish that includes tunas, mackerels and bonitos have fallen by 74 per cent.  Declining stocks of bluefin...

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SOUTHERN OCEAN STARTS TO SOAK UP CARBON AGAIN...

Sep 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     A research vessel plows through the waves of the Southern Ocean, also known as the Antarctic Ocean, to measure levels of dissolved carbon dioxide. (Nicolas Metzl, LOCEAN/IPSL Laboratory) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The high seas have begun to respond again to the changes in the atmosphere, with two new studies confirming that the Southern Ocean is absorbing more atmospheric carbon. Levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have been steadily increasing as humans burn ever more fossil fuels, but climate scientists will probably hesitate before exhaling sighs of relief over the latest findings. Rising CO2 in the atmosphere means global warming, which means climate change, melting ice caps, rising sea levels—and even more global warming and...

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CLEAN ENERGY PLANS MAY INCREASE TOXINS IN PLANKTON...

Sep 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Alex Kirby, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Harnessing the power of Muskrat Falls to produce hydroelectricity could be damaging for indigenous communities. (innovationtrail via Flickr) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Scientists in the US think they may now have the explanation to a conundrum that has puzzled them for a long time—why there are high levels of methylmercury, which can damage the nervous system, in Arctic marine life. The answer, they report, appears to be one of those examples of worsening a problem by trying to solve it: human attempts to mitigate climate change have inadvertently altered the eating habits of Arctic plankton. Researchers from the Harvard John A.Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health suggest...

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DUTCH STUDENT DESIGNS OCEAN CLEANUP ARRAY...

Sep 2, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]         the ocean cleanup array won the 2015 INDEX: award due its potential to address one the largest global challenges. the innovative and well-researched idea by 21-year-old dutch engineering student boyan slat, will greatly improve the condition of the earth’s greatest natural resource, as well as the lives of millions. ‘we live in a plastic age and we’ve already recognised a number of global challenges related to the oceans,’ explains index: award jury member katinka von der lippe, strategic design, aestethics & design management at eker design/hydrolift. ‘it’s about time we’re serious about a resource that makes up over 70% of the world’s surface.’ a rendered image of the plastic collection platform         the solution will not only have tremendous benefits for the environment and biodiversity, but will improve...

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TOO WARM, TOO FEW FISH: HEALTH WARNING FOR WORLD’S OCEANS...

Aug 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Kieran Cooke, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Overfishing compounds ocean damage from climate change. (John Wallace / NOAA via Wikimedia Commons) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The world’s oceans—covering nearly two-thirds of the Earth’s surface, and on which much of human life depends—are under severe pressure, a report says. Over-fishing has dramatically reduced fish stocks. The thousands of tonnes of rubbish dumped in the oceans wreak havoc on marine life, while climate change is warming and acidifying them, putting them under further stress. These are the sobering conclusions of a wide-ranging study of the Earth’s ecosystems by the Worldwatch Institute, a US-based organisation widely rated as one of the world’s foremost environmental think-tanks. “Our sense of the ocean’s power and omnipotence—combined with scientific ignorance—contributed to...

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WE’RE MAKING MASSIVE WASTE ISLANDS IN THE SEA...

Aug 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] We’re making massive waste islands in the seahttps://youtu.be/mMG1SdeYLFE By Clayton Aldern  GRIST https://youtu.be/mMG1SdeYLFE That message in a bottle you tossed into the sea as a youngrapscallion? Remember how you didn’t get a response? It’s because oceans aren’t the same thing as carrier pigeons. Instead of sending bottles bobbing merrily on their way across the Pacific, ocean currents tend to push bits of trash to convergence points in the ocean called garbage patches.The video above shows a new data visualization from NASA illustrating the phenomenon. By mapping the paths of free-floating ocean buoys distributed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration over a period of 35 years, scientists were able to verify the garbage patch effect, as well as the locations of the patches. Aside from providing these insights, the visualization is a win...

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AN UNDERSEA VOLCANO PREVIEWS A TERRIFYING FUTURE FOR THE WORLD’S OCEANS...

Aug 13, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Scientists discover an area in the South Pacific where high levels of carbon dioxide have created dead zones where healthy coral reefs should be. Algae-covered habitats dominate areas of Maug Island, in the Pacific Ocean, closest to underwater volcanic vents that spew carbon dioxide. (Photo: Stephani Gordon/Open Boat Films/NOAA) Aug 12, 2015 Emily J. Gertz is TakePart’s associate editor for environment and wildlife. Bio In a remote area of the South Pacific, nature has opened a window on the most likely future for the world’s tropical coral reefs unless nations radically cut fossil fuel emissions. It’s not a pretty picture. Rather than “a very healthy reef full of diverse coral communities” including hundreds of fish, said marine biologist Ian Enochs, there’s just a thick carpet of green fuzz along with...

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PROTECTING THE UNTAMED SEAS

Aug 2, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By IAN URBINA NYTIMES Photo Credit Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images SUPPOSE a group of scientists wanted to dump 100 tons of iron dust into the sea based on a controversial climate-change theory that the ore might spur the growth of plankton that absorb carbon dioxide. They can — one businessman did that in 2012. Imagine if entrepreneurial engineers hoping to save clients millions of dollars were able to launch rockets into space from a platform in the middle of the ocean, far away from curious onlookers, heavy taxes and strict on-land regulations. They can — a company has been doing this for over a decade. And what if pharmaceutical companies decide to rake the ocean floor for the next wonder drug, with minimal environmental oversight and no obligation to make the profits, research or...

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THESE CARBON-HUNGRY BLOBS COULD HELP FIX OUR OCEANS...

Jul 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TED / Edith Widder Goo Riddance By Ana Sofia Knauf  GRIST Hey, beachgoers: Have you ever ventured into the ocean on a steaming hot day, eager to splash around in the cold waves, and found yourself entirely surrounded by a bunch of translucent gooey blobs? Have no fear – you’re probably not being swarmed by tiny jellyfish or swimming in the remnants of a sea turtle’s messy meal. In fact, you most likely found some harmless salps, which are washing up along the coastal United States, National Geographic reports. Salps are barrel-shaped ocean invertebrates that belong to a group called tunicates, and they also feel extremely gross against your legs. But you’ll just have to deal with that squishy sensation, because salps are also tiny climate-change fighters! National Geographic has the details: Salps’ cloning tendencies also let them take advantage of algae blooms....

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WAVING, NOT DROWNING: HOW SOME CORAL REEFS WILL SURVIVE CLIMATE CHANGE...

Jul 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Now, a new study offers hope that some coral reefs will survive rising temperatures and oceans. As water temperatures increase and the oceans become more acidic, coral reefs around the world are dying. Others face death by drowning as sea levels rise. But scientists studying coral reefs surrounding Palau, an archipelago in the western Pacific Ocean, have found that they are managing to grow at a rate that keeps pace with sea-level rise. As long as sea-level and temperature increases remain moderate, the coral reefs, also called micro atolls, are likely to survive until the end of the 21st century, the researchers concluded. So, Why Should You Care? The oceans are absorbing growing amounts of carbon dioxide produced by the burning of fossil fuels, and the resulting acidification could cost the global economy $1 trillion a year by...

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THIS SEAWEED TASTES LIKE BACON. IT COULD HELP CLEAN THE OCEANS....

Jul 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Stephen Ward, OSU Extension and Experiment Station Communications Dulse, sustainable seaweed that could taste like bacon.   Last week, researchers at Oregon State University announced that they had successfully patented a new strain of red marine algae, known as dulse, that grows extremely quickly and could serve as an excellent source of plant-based protein. It also, according to researchers, tastes exactly like bacon when it’s fried. That last fact was enough to set the food world into a tailspin, inspiring a flurry of media coverage touting dulse as a “super seaweed,” “the holy grail of seafood,” and “the unicorn.” Finding a nutrient-rich alternative to bacon is certainly good news for health-conscious eaters — but an increase in seaweed farming across the United States would be really good...

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HUGE TOXIC ALGAL BLOOM SHUTS DOWN WEST COAST FISHERIES...

Jun 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Commercial and recreational fisheries up and down the West Coast have been forced to close as a result of a massive toxic algal bloom, which scientists are describing as one of the largest in history. “We have received reports of this particular bloom causing problems as far south as Monterey Bay and we’ve heard from our colleagues in Homer, Alaska that they’re seeing these cells,” Vera Trainer, manager of the Marine Biotoxin Program at NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center, told ThinkProgress. “It’s geographically very widespread, more so than we’ve seen in the past.” The last time an algal bloom of comparative size occurred on the West Coast was in 1988. That bloom stretched from San Diego up to Washington. Essentially what we’ve got is just...

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8 Staggeringly Beautiful Photos to Celebrate World Oceans Day...

Jun 8, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment The jury is out on whether life on Earth began at the bottom of the ocean, but make no mistake: Life on Earth depends on it. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet World Oceans Day has been celebrated every June 8 since 1992, when Canada proposed it at Earth Day in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon stressed the importance of healthy oceans in his message for the day: Two out of every five people live relatively close to a shore, and three out of seven depend on marine and coastal resources to survive. Our oceans regulate the climate and process nutrients through natural cycles while providing a wide range of services, including natural resources, food and jobs that benefit billions of people. Given how critical oceans are to the health...

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DUTCH TEEN’S OCEAN-CLEANING INVENTION TO LAUNCH NEXT YEAR...

Jun 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The Ocean Cleanup By Liz Core GRIST Don’t know if you’ve heard, but the Netherlands has an unstoppable deluge of unusual (and kinda amazing) green ideas, infrastructure, and, apparently, youths. Boyan Slat, boy inventor, has been working on a plan to clean up plastic waste in the ocean since 2012. His invention underwent a year-long feasibility study with a team of scientists and engineers. And now, the project is moving forward with a two-year trial off the waters of Japan in 2016. A boy genius teaming up with a hundred researchers to help save the ocean? I sense a new Disney movie in the making, people! Slat’s idea, The Ocean Cleanup Array, consists of solar-powered spinning booms that act as a floating barrier and use the ocean’s currents to concentrate plastic. The trial version will be 2,000 meters (1.2 miles) long. The 20-year-old said in a press release that if...

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AERSOLS MAY OFFER SHORT-TERM LIFELINE TO CORALS IN CRISIS...

May 30, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Bleached coral on a reef off the coast of Fiji in the South Pacific. (Peter J. Mumby, University of Queensland) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—A new solution has been proposed for the forthcoming crisis of the coral reefs: blot out some of the sunlight. Scientists from the US, UK and Australia suggest a form of climate engineering called solar radiation management, which involves pumping aerosols into the stratosphere to reduce global temperatures—and especially the warming of the tropic seas. If sea temperatures rise just 1°C to 2°C above the normal summer high, something gruesome happens to the coral reefs: they bleach. This is because they sicken, and expel the colourful algae with which they cohabit. It is...

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Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse’s Best Climate Change Burns...

May 19, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS For climate activists — or really anyone who thinks climate change is a problem — there’s a lot to love about Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse. The two-term Democratic Senator from Rhode Island is a climate change champion in Congress, introducing legislation aimed at slowing the planet’s warming, calling out colleagues who deny the problem exists, and, for nearly the past three years, giving weekly, impassioned speeches on the Senate floor on the need to act on climate change. On Monday, Whitehouse will give his 100th floor speech on climate change. As Agence France-Presse reports, Whitehouse usually gives these speeches to an empty or near-empty room, accompanied by a green sign warning his colleagues that it’s “Time To Wake Up.” Few of Whitehouse’s colleagues have taken his pleas for action...

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Sea Level Rise Is Happening Faster Than Anyone Thought...

May 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha GeilingCLIMATE PROGRSS Sea level rise is happening faster than previously thought, according to a new study. CREDIT: Shutterstock Global sea level rise isn’t just happening — it’s happening much faster than previously thought, according to new research from climate scientists at the University of Tasmania, in Australia. The study, published Monday in Nature Climate Change, found that sea level rise has been speeding up over the past two decades compared to the rest of the 20th century. This contradicts previous satellite data dating back to 1993, which appeared to show sea level rise accelerating in the 1990s, but slowing slightly over the past decade. “That slowing has puzzled scientists because it coincides with an increase in water entering our oceans from Greenland and West Antarctica,” Christopher Watson, the study’s lead author,...

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Carbon Pollution’s Harm To Sea Life Coming Faster Than Expected...

May 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm   CLIMATE PROGRESS Pacific oysters are being harvested in this AP file photo. Experts warn rising CO2 levels in the ocean pose a major danger to shellfish and other sea life. CREDIT: AP/Ted S. Warren The oceans are now acidifying faster than they have been over the last 300 million years, a time period in which there were four major extinctions driven by natural bursts of carbon. In fact, humans are acidifying the oceans 10 times faster today than 55 million years ago when a mass extinction of marine species occurred. Recent research finds that the threat to marine life posed by human-caused carbon pollution is coming faster than expected. And that’s a problem because as 70 Academies of Science warned in a 2009 joint statement on acidification: “Marine food supplies...

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Famous Coral Reef System In Belize Could Soon Be The Site Of Oil Drilling...

May 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page  CLIMATE PROGRESS Belize’s waters are pretty much perfect the way they are. CREDIT: via Shutterstock A World Heritage Site could turn into an oil drilling site, if plans to allow oil exploration off the coast of Belize go through. A proposal from the Belize Ministry of Energy provides guidelines for oil exploration — and drilling, if oil is found — across most of the country’s land and water, including along the Belize Barrier Reef, one of the world’s most ecologically diverse environments. Oceana Belize, an environmental advocacy group, has launched a campaign to halt oil exploration and to get more information from the government about the plan and what went into creating it. “The general consensus we’re getting from Belizeans is… ‘Didn’t we already decide not to do this? Why...

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Seas Generate a Rising Tide of Ideas on Renewables...

May 11, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Paul Brown, Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     Atlantic waves rush ashore on the west coast of Ireland. (Robert Bone via Wikimedia Commons) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—A race is on worldwide to harness the tides and waves for electrical power, with more than 100 different devices being tested by companies hoping to make a commercial breakthrough. And a new report from the European Union’s Joint Research Centre expresses confidence that the Atlantic Ocean will soon be an important contributor to the continent’s energy mix. It adds that many other countries with big tidal ranges and long coasts are also banking on this form of renewable energy to help reduce fossil fuel use. For years, it has been predicted that the vast quantities of...

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Fighting for Our Oceans

May 3, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Zoe Loftus-Farren – EARTH ISLAND JOURNAL From Haiti to Scotland, Goldman Environmental Prize winners tackle marine management challenges In an era of seemingly unlimited threats to the environment, ocean health is one of the most urgent and severe challenges facing activists today. The oceans are under fire from almost uncountable ills, including rampant overfishing, ocean acidification, plastics pollution, oil spills, and ocean dumping, to name a few. But although the challenges are humbling, there are some activists who have faced them head-on, and with astounding success. Photo courtesy of Goldman AwardsJean Wiener has worked for more than two decades to protect Haiti’s coastal environment and empower local communities. Jean Wiener and Howard Wood may live 4,000 miles apart, but their lives have taken many similar turns. Both grew up surrounded by water,...

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Global Warming Slowdown Offers Only Fleeting Relief...

May 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Tim Radford, Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG One day’s carbon dioxide emissions as illustrated in the film “CCS: a 2 degree solution.” (Carbon Visuals via Flickr) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The so-called hiatus in global warming will probably make no difference to the world in the long run, according to Australian scientists. Using computer models to take the planetary temperature in 2100, they found that one set of models incorporated the slowdown, but others did not. In the end, the difference was barely significant: less than 0.1°C. The hiatus is a measurable slowdown in the rate of increase in average global temperatures since the turn of the century. But since, under the notorious business-as-usual scenario, average planetary temperatures in 2100 will be a predicted 5°C higher...

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The Unseen Slaughter Under the Sea...

Apr 30, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Ocean Defenders Alliance is on a mission to stop abandoned “ghost nets” from killing dolphins, sea turtles, and millions of other marine animals. April 20, 2015 Taylor Hill isTakePart’s associate environment and wildlife editor. full bi LOS ANGELES—As we set off for our destination off the Southern California coast, Captain Rex Levi weaves Mr. Barker’s LegaSea, a 55-foot Chris Craft yacht, between the massive cargo ships plying Los Angeles Harbor. The dockworkers’ strike of the past winter is over but still reverberates at sea as the behemoths queue 35 deep, waiting their turn to offload cars, clothes, and other merchandise at the Port of Los Angeles. Mr. Barker’s LegaSea belongs to environmental group Ocean Defenders Alliance and is named for Bob Barker, the game-show host and animal rights activist who donated $150,000—the price...

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