GREENS BASH HEADS OVER HOW TO DEAL WITH WILDFIRES...

Jan 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Katie Herzog GRIST There’s little doubt that wildfires are getting bigger, badder, and more damaging across the globe, but the question of how to deal with them is dividing environmentalists. According to most calculations, 2015 was a record-setting year for wildfires in the U.S. By the end, more than 10 million acres had burned across the country. Many of these were in the Western states, where hellish, otherworldly burns took over in normally temperate states like Washington and Alaska. In Boise, Idaho, a 100-foot-tall “firenado” sprouted from a blaze. California alone experienced more than 6,300 wildfires. The U.S. Forest Service recently named last year’s fire season as the worst in history. But this, according to some environmentalists, was a mistake — and one that’s only going to make the problem worse. The response to wildfires is generally to fight them: 1,200...

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NEW MAP SHOWS THE IMPACT OF SEA LEVEL RISE...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] New Map Shows the Impact of Sea Level Rise THE DIRT by Jared Green World leaders have begun to get serious about fighting climate change, but the incredible risk of a rising sea remains in this century and far into the future. According to Climate Central, a research organization, a 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) global temperature increase, which is our current path, could result in sea level rise that would submerge land where 470 – 760 million people now live. If the world’s governments actually meet the declared goal of the UN climate summit in Paris and reduce and draw down carbon emissions, keeping the world to a 2 °C warming (3.6 °F) temperature increase, 130 million would need to evacuate over coming decades. To understand how serious this could be, here’s some...

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SCIENTISTS DISCOVER THAT MELTING GLACIERS ARE SLOWING DOWN THE EARTH’S ROTATION...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Medlock    INHABITAT As climate change continues to affect the planet, rising sea levels are just one of the visible consequences. NASA has predicted a one meter rise worldwide in the next few centuries, which is disastrous for coastal communities – but that’s not all. Scientists studying the Earth’s core recently announced that changing sea levels are actually slowing down the Earth’s rotation. A study published in Science Advances this month investigated different contributors to both rising sea levels and a slowing down of the Earth’s rotation. It turns out that, over the past 3000 years, the Earth’s core has been speeding up while the mantle-crust (where we live) has been slowing down. One mechanism at play is the melting of our planet’s glaciers: as the polar water melts it is drawn...

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The Arctic Is Melting at a Record Pace — and It’s Having a Scary Impact on Global Weather...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Scientists warn that we are entering uncharted territory when it comes to the loss of Arctic sea ice. By Dahr Jamail / Truthout   VIA ALTERNET Arctic sea ice is melting at a record pace – and every summer looks grimmer. This past summer saw the ice pack at its fourth-lowest level on record, and the overall trend in recent decades suggests this will only continue. “Using satellites, scientists have found that the area of sea ice coverage each September has declined by more than 40 percent since the late 1970s, a trend that has accelerated since 2007,” according to the recent report “Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic” by the National Research Council of the National Academies. The report added that by the end of each of the eight summers...

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WARMING FUELS RISE IN METHANE THREAT...

Jan 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Alex Kirby / Climate News Network     Post-glacial lakes such as these in Stordalen, northern Sweden, are significant emitters of methane. (Jo Uhlbäck) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—There is fresh concern among scientists over the rises they are detecting in one of the chief greenhouse gases, methane. A team of researchers from universities in Sweden and the US says methane is increasing in the atmosphere fast enough for emissions of the gas possibly to rise by between 20% and 50% before the end of the century. Over a century, methane is 25 times more powerful as a greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide, the main gas contributing to global warming. But over a 20-year period, methane is 84 times more potent than CO2. Many methane...

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EARTH IS EXPERIENCING A GLOBAL WARMING SPURT,...

Jan 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment The much slower-moving cycle of the Pacific Ocean has been playing a role in record-breaking warmth. By John Upton / Climate Central   VIA ALTERNET Cyclical changes in the Pacific Ocean have thrown Earth’s surface into what may be an unprecedented warming spurt, following a global warming slowdown that lasted about 15 years. While El Niño is being blamed for an outbreak of floods, storms and unseasonable temperatures across the planet, a much slower-moving cycle of the Pacific Ocean has also been playing a role in record-breaking warmth. The recent effects of both ocean cycles are being amplified by climate change. High temperatures are bleaching corals, such as this bent sea rod off Florida. (image: U.S. Geological Survey/Flickr) A 2014 flip was detected in the sluggish and elusive ocean cycle known as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation,...

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THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER IS ABOUT TO HAVE A RECORD FLOOD OUT OF SEASON...

Dec 30, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Tech & Science By Zoë Schlanger On 12/29/15 at 6:21 PM Volunteers stack sandbags on the banks of the River Des Peres on December 29, 2015 in St. Louis, Missouri. The St. Louis area and surrounding region are bracing for record flood crests of the Mississippi, Missouri and Meramec Rivers after days of record rainfall. Michael B. Thomas/Getty Tech & Science The Mississippi River is flooding in a big way right now, at the wrong time of year, and is forecasted to match or break 22-year-old crest records over the next few days. Meteorologists are calling it “insane.” Over the next three to four days, the Mississippi is predicted to reach a crest height of 49.7 feet at Chester, Illinois, one of several locations where the National Weather Service records data about the river. As...

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SPACEX’S HISTORY-MAKING LAUNCH COULD BE ECLIPSED BY ITS NEXT MISSION...

Dec 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Emily Atkin CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/John Raoux The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Sunday, June 28, 2015.   Elon Musk’s private spaceflight company SpaceX made history on Monday night. Ten minutes after launching a Falcon-9 rocket into orbit to deploy 11 satellites, the rocket’s first stage booster returned to earth, upright and intact. It was the first time an unmanned rocket has successfully landed upright after a commercial launch; an achievement that many say will help dramatically reduce the cost of space travel. The moment was a milestone, and particularly welcome after the catastrophic launch failure of another Falcon-9 last June. But SpaceX’s next mission is arguably even more important than...

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LAKES ARE HEATING UP, PUTTING FOOD AND WATER SUPPLY AT RISK...

Dec 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe Ethnic Intha fishermen dressed in customary attire with traditional fish-traps pretend to catch fish for tourists to take pictures as a real fisherman catches fish in the background in Inle lake, northeastern Shan state, Myanmar.   While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Researchers looked at 235 lakes around the world over the past 25 years and found that, on average, they are gaining a third of a degree (Celsius) every decade. The study, which used onsite measurements and satellite temperature data, found that warming was most pronounced in northern and tropical regions. “These results...

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On Thin Ice: Big Northern Lakes Are Being Rapidly Transformed...

Dec 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] As temperatures rise, northern lakes are undergoing major changes that include swiftly warming waters, diminished ice cover, and outbreaks of harmful algae. By Cheryl Katz / Yale Environment 360   VIA ALTERNET The first drops of icicles on a frozen Lake Baikal. Endless ice desert with ice hummocks Photo Credit: Katvic For more than 25 million years, Lake Baikal has cut an immense arc from southern Siberia to the Mongolian border. The length of Florida and nearly the depth of the Grand Canyon, Baikal is the deepest, largest in volume, and most ancient freshwater lake in the world, holding one-fifth of the planet’s above-ground drinking supply. It’s a Noah’s Ark of biodiversity, home to myriad species found nowhere else on earth. It’s also changing Baikal’s surface waters are warming at an accelerating pace, rising at least...

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STUDY SHOWS CORAL REEFS CAN BE ‘INCREDIBLY RESILIENT’ TO WARMING EVENTS...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)   D Coral reefs have had a tough time in the last two decades as warming temperatures, overfishing, chemical runoff, and disease have sparked massive coral die-offs. But reefs in the Indian Ocean show that substantial recovery is possible, a study released Wednesday found. The study, published in Scientific Reports, looks at 28 reefs in the remote Chagos Archipelago, an area that lost 90 percent of its corals in 1998 after an unprecedented rise in sea temperatures. Nearly 20 years later, coral reefs there are back to optimum health, demonstrating that reefs can bounce back “rapidly” from major climate-driven disturbances. [The] coral cover was absolutely wonderful. I mean stunningly beautiful Researchers interviewed said the study is another example of how proper management...

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HAFENCITY’S FLOOD-PROOF DESIGN IN GERMANY CAN CHEAT RISING SEA LEVELS...

Dec 17, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Medlock   INHABITAT Hamburg, Germany is one of the world’s many cities threatened by rising sea levels, yet its development of the eco-friendly HafenCity district may be part of the solution. The island sits a mere 4.5 or 5 meters above sea level, yet instead of abandoning the area and moving inward, the city has developed HafenCity into a model of sustainability for its 2,000 residents. Even more impressive is its simple solution to annual flooding and the effects of climate change. The area used to be an industrial harbor, yet now houses thousands of citizens in swanky, solar-powered apartments and entertains visitors with commercial spaces in “the new downtown” Hamburg. HafenCity has strict policies about new developments, requiring them to adhere to the Gold Standard, or the equivalent of LEED Platinum...

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CLIMATE CHANGE IS MAKING THE EARTH WOBBLE...

Dec 13, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART Melting glaciers are affecting the planet’s rotation—and time itself. A view of melting icebergs calved from Breidamerkurjokull’s Vatnajokull glacier in southeast Iceland, about 236 miles from Reykjavik. (Photo: Ints Kalnins/Reuters) Emily J. Gertz is an associate editor for environment and wildlife at TakePart.   As pollution from burning fossil fuels continues to heat the atmosphere, the world’s glaciers are melting at an accelerating rate. Scientists widely agree that this meltwater has been a major factor in raising global sea levels about seven inches over the 20th century. The movement of all that water is affecting the Earth’s rotation, according to a study published Friday in the journal Science. Advertisement “If you are melting glaciers from high latitudes—in Alaska, Greenland, or Iceland—you move mass away from the pole, toward the equator, which...

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THE CHILLING SCIENCE ON ALASKA’S MELTING PERMAFROST...

Dec 11, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Soil Science By Andrea Thompson GRIST Cross-posted from Climate Central Up to a quarter of the permafrost that lies just under the ground surface in Alaska could thaw by the end of the century, releasing long-trapped carbon that could make its way into the atmosphere and exacerbate global warming, a new study finds. Polygonal lakes created by melting permafrost on Alaska’s North Slope. NASA The study, detailed in the journal Remote Sensing of Environment, maps where that near-surface permafrost lies across Alaska in more detail than previous efforts. That detail could help determine where to focus future work and what areas are at risk of other effects of permafrost melt, such as changes to local ecosystems and threats to infrastructure, the study’s authors say. About one-quarter of the land in the Northern Hemisphere...

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THE HOPEFUL NEWS ABOUT C02 EMISSIONS AND CLIMATE CHANGE...

Dec 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Phil Plait   GRIST This story was originally published by Slate and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Our planet is heating up. The cause is in some ways simple: Humans add a lot of carbon dioxide to the air every year, about 40 billion tons of it. CO2 is a greenhouse gas: It lets sunlight through to heat the ground, but the infrared light the ground emits gets absorbed, and cannot escape to space. That warms us up, slowly but inevitably. By every measure available to us, we see the effects of this increased heat. But there’s hope, at least a hint of it. A new study has some hopeful news about global warming: The global emission of carbon dioxide slowed substantially in 2014, and is projected to drop...

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HOW CLIMATE CHANGE IS WREAKING HAVOC ON THE AMERICAN EMPIRE...

Dec 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environmental changes are splintering the power structure. By Tom Engelhardt / Tom Dispatch   Photo Credit: Bruce Rolff / Shutterstock To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up to receive the latest updates from TomDispatch.com here.   For six centuries or more, history was, above all, the story of the great game of empires. From the time the first wooden ships mounted with cannons left Europe’s shores, they began to compete for global power and control.  Three, four, even five empires, rising and falling, on an increasingly commandeered and colonized planet. The story, as usually told, is a tale of concentration and of destruction until, in the wake of the second great bloodletting of the twentieth century, there were just two imperial powers left standing: the United States and the Soviet Union....

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VIDEO: James Hansen: United Nations’ Plans to Limit Emissions Are ‘Half-Arsed’...

Dec 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] DEMOCRACY NOW   VIA TRUTHDIG   James Hansen, one of the world’s leading atmospheric scientists, has warned the United Nations that its current attempt to prevent global temperatures from rising is “half-arsed and half-baked” and risks giving future generations a climate system that is uncontrollably destructive.ABOVE: At the U.N. climate conference in Paris, Hansen delivers his message to “Democracy Now!’ The Guardian reports: James Hansen, former head of Nasa’s Goddard Center and the man who raised awareness of climate change in a key Senate hearing back in 1988 said that the UN meeting was on the wrong track by seeking a 2C maximum rise in temperatures. “What I am hearing is that the heads of state are planning to clap each other on the back and say this is a very successful conference....

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SOUTHERN INDIA IS HIT WITH DEADLY FLOODING AFTER WETTEST DECEMBER DAY IN V100 YEARS...

Dec 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo Volunteers rescue flood affected people on a country boat from a residential area in Chennai, India, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015.   Extreme rainfall in southern India has killed nearly 270 people and displaced about a million more, as flooding causes major problems in the state of Tamil Nadu. Chennai, the capital of Tamil Nadu and fourth-most-populous city in India, experienced its wettest December day in over a century this week, according to AccuWeather. That follows a November that brought the city 300 percent more rain than is usual for the month. Monsoon winds typically bring rainfall to Chennai during October, November, and December, but rainfall this year has been exceptional — the city and surrounding region has gotten more than 11 inches of rainfall over...

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RECORD HEAT PUTS AUSTRALIA AT RISK OF INTENSE FIRE SEASON...

Nov 21, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By MICHELLE INNIS  NYTIMES Photo A fire east of Esperance in Western Australia this week. A prolonged fire season could strain the largely volunteer firefighting forces in Australia and destroy crops, livestock and farms. Credit Department of Fire and Emergency/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images   SYDNEY, Australia — A fire that raged this week across hundreds of thousands of acres of grasslands and about-to-be harvested wheat crops, killing a farmer and three workers, points to a dangerous summer ahead in Australia, scientists and weather watchers say. From Our Advertisers The fire, in the south of Western Australia, began last weekend after lightning struck about 12 miles north of the township of Esperance. It was flaring six days later after burning through 580 square miles of farmland, fanned by temperatures above 100 degrees and...

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WHAT COULD A COLD WAR ON GLOBAL WARMING ACHIEVE? ASK THE PENTAGON...

Nov 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] FTP.ARL.MIL By Heather Smith GRIST A little over a decade ago, my friend Ed took me to see ENIAC — the first programmable electronic computer. Well, it was less than 10 percent of ENIAC. It sat in a glass case in a corner of the engineering school at the University of Pennsylvania, and there were just a few parts left of what had been a 30-ton machine: large metal rectangles and a few snaking cables. We peered through the glass. It looked like the kind of thing that a very eccentric shut-in might make in a basement, which was sort of true, except that the shut-ins were engineers and the whole thing cost them about $6 million in today’s dollars to build. “It was built with what they called ‘a baby-killer grant’,” said Ed, as we pressed our faces to the glass....

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CLIMATE CHANGE HELPS ALASKANS GROW ORGANIC FOOD ON THE TUNDRA...

Nov 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Bethel, Alaska.    Andrea Pokrzywinski By Kate Yoder    GRIST Between fighting wildfires and rerouting the Iditarod, Alaska has had a tough time with climate change. But at least there’s one good outcome: local food. In Bethel, a town in southwestern Alaska, farmer Tim Meyers is taking advantage of rising temperatures to grow food in the previously inhospitable tundra. NPR reports: At the 15-acre organic farm, which has been operating for more than a decade, Meyers is growing crops like strawberries in greenhouses. But he says as temperatures warm due to climate change, it’s easier to grow things like potatoes, cabbages and kale right in the ground, outside. “Years ago, it was hard freeze and below zero up to the third week in May,” he says. “We haven’t had any of that this winter.” Meyers...

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Slow-Motion Disaster: New York Prepares for Up to Six Feet of Sea Level Rise...

Nov 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By the end of the century, LaGuardia Airport will have fish swimming where airplanes once parked. By Bobby Magill / Climate Central   VIA ALTERNET November 3, 2015   Photo Credit: Matthew Kraus/Flickr LaGuardia Airport is about to be rebuilt in New York City, but by the end of the century, fish could be swimming where airplanes once parked at the terminal. That’s because sea levels in the area could rise by as much as 6 feet over the next 75 years, according to new predictions released by the state of New York.   The flooded Battery Park Tunnel in New York City following Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. (image: Timothy Krause/Flickr) New York State environment officials announced Friday that they’re creating new sea level rise regulations that will help coastal communities build more...

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Climate Change Could Make The Persian Gulf So Hot People Can’t Spend More Than A Few Hours Outside...

Oct 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]  by Natasha Geiling Oct 27, 2015 12:54pm CREDIT: Shutterstock Abu Dhabi, capital of the United Arab Emirates.   This summer, a heat wave sent temperatures near the Persian Gulf skyrocketing, with outdoor temperatures reaching as high as 120°F throughout parts of Iraq and Iran. And while those temperatures might seem extreme, a new study published in Nature Climate Change suggests that scorching temperatures could become increasingly common in the region by the end of the century, if climate change is left unchecked. According to the study, outdoor temperatures in the Persian Gulf could reach levels inhospitable to human survival as often as once every decade by 2100, with heat and humidity climbing so high that healthy humans couldn’t survive for more than a few hours outside. This would place a huge amount of...

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THE RAINFORESTS HOLD THE KEY TO TAMING EL NINO’S DESTRUCTION...

Oct 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE GUARDIAN Healthy forests protect our climate and moderate our weather. As the ‘Godzilla’ El Niño builds in the weeks ahead of Paris talks, it is a timely warning that deforestation is partly to blame for its impacts Analyses from Noaa and Nasa confirm that El Niño is strengthening and that it looks a lot like the strong event that occurred in 1997–98. Photograph: Noaa/Nasa Deborah Lawrence Lawrence is an environmental sciences researcher at the University of Virginia   Indonesia is smouldering and Godzilla is to blame. But even though this is reality, not a monster movie, there is still a hero: the tropical rainforest. This year’s El Niño, the ocean-traveling climate cycle notorious for throwing the weather off kilter, is nicknamed “Godzilla”. While it is projected to deliver plenty of rain to...

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THE CLIMATE CHANGE FIX WE NEED: WE’LL NEVER SOLVE THE PROBLEM UNTIL WE DO THIS...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] We can’t solve global warming until we fix our politics. Here’s how we start Jedediah Purdy   SALON.COM   Topics: Climate Change, Global Warming, Books, Democracy, Editor’s Picks, Sustainability News The climate change fix we need: We’ll never solve the problem until we do this (Credit: AP/Reuters/Gary Cameron/Joe Skipper/Jose Luis Magana) Democracy has not been doing well. For this reason, now is an awkward time to argue that it must be the fulcrum of the Anthropocene. In the United States and Europe, democracies have rushed into foolish wars and stumbled in the face of economic crises—or created those crises. At the time of writing, the North Atlantic democracies are splitting into elite technocrats, who wish they could govern without consulting the masses, and angry populists, who would like to liquidate the technocrats. Nondemocratic governments...

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THINGS ARE COMPLICATED BETWEEN ARCTIC SEA ICE AND AIR POLLUTION...

Oct 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] NASA By Suzanne Jacobs GRIST Sea ice and air pollution are in a bit of a love-hate relationship right now. On the one hand, pollution from extracting and burning fossil fuels is causing global warming, which is melting all the sea ice. On the other hand, other kinds of pollution from burning said fossil fuels is reflecting sunlight and thus delaying said melting. So while sea ice’s friends are all, “That pollution is bad news, man!,” ice is all: And it is bad news: Summer sea ice levels in the Arctic were their fourth lowest on record this year, Scientific American reports. And thanks to our own complicated relationship with greenhouse gases (above GIF also applies), those levels are declining at a rate of about 13 percent per decade. But in a recent paper published in Geophysical Research Letters,...

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MY DARK CALIFORNIA DREAM

Oct 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Credit Illustration by Mark Pernice Our­ parents had wide open spaces all around. We still had nature within reach. Now what? By DANIEL DUANE CALIFORNIA’S over, everything I love about this place is going to hell. I knew there was something familiar about this thought from the moment it occurred to me in Yosemite National Park. My sister and I started going to those mountains 40 years ago with our parents, who taught us to see the Sierra Nevada as a never-changing sanctuary in a California increasingly overrun by suburban sprawl. Once we had our own families, we indoctrinated our kids in the same joys: suffering under backpacks, drinking snowmelt from creeks, jumping into (and quickly back out of) icy lakes, and napping in wildflower meadows. Yosemite remains my personal paradise, but the...

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THIS IS WHY THEY’RE DENIERS: THE SCIENCE THAT GOES DEEP INTO THE ANTI-CLIMATE-CHANGE BRAIN...

Oct 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate change is obviously a real concern. So how do deniers close their minds to reality? A scientist explains Paul Rosenberg  SALON.COM (Credit: AP/Reuters/Joshua Lott/David Becker/Chris Keane/John Minchillo) Over the past two decades, the phenomenon of climate denial has come into focus almost as much as climate change itself. We’ve now reached the point where the Republican Party is virtually the only conservative party in the world that’s still playing ostrich when it comes to climate change. But is denialism alone enough to explain the psychological resistance to saving the planet? Canadian psychologist Robert Gifford, of the University of Victoria, doesn’t think so. In fact, he’s identified so many psychological barriers to action—what he calls “dragons of inaction”—that he’s organized them into seven main categories, or, if each dragon represents a “species,” seven...

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NO LONGER CONSIDERED AN EXTREME EVENT! MEGA ICEBERGS ARE WREAKING HAVOC IN THE SOUTHERN OCEAN...

Oct 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Pakalolo  DAILY KOS Mega-icebergs dump billions of gallons of freshwater into the oceans. Image credit: Merco Press Scientists have sent out an urgent message to the world. We need to study West Antarctica’s glaciers, and in particular the Thwaites glacier, fast.  “It is hard to find tipping points in physical systems likely to be activated in the near future, with the possible exception of Thwaites,” Richard Alley, a glaciologist at Penn State University. Our understanding of predicting sea level rise depends on the infusion of resources per the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. There is now widespread, rapid grounding line retreat of Pine Island, Thwaites, Smith, and Kohler glaciers. Until recently, the glaciers and the ice sheets of Antarctica have been in harmony. They had formed a stable system with...

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Secrets of the GOP Science War: How Spin-Masters and Pundits Confuse Conservatives About Facts...

Oct 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Tea Party and the Right Conservatives have become much less trusting of science. A cynical right-wing campaign is behind that By Paul Rosenberg / Salon   VIA ALTERNET When scientists announced the discovery of water on Mars recently, Rush Limbaugh drew the obvious conclusion: It was all part of a conspiratorial plot: LIMBAUGH: If there was once all that water on Mars, and there is a lot of water here on earth, what’s going to happen to our ocean? How did the water vanish? My point is, they’re presenting all this stuff to you as fact just like they’re presenting everything involving global warming as scientific fact. It`s nothing but wild guesses. It’s nothing but based on computer models which is the result of data input that who knows if it’s legit or not....

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