DEAD ZONES DEVOUR OCEAN’S OXYGEN...

May 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     Extremes of heat deprive fish of the oxygen they need to survive near the ocean surface. (Naren Gunasekera via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Scientists in the US have identified a new hazard in a world in which the climates change and the oceans warm: measurable stretches of the seas could become sapped of oxygen. They say that parts of the southern Indian Ocean, the eastern tropical Pacific and the Atlantic are already less oxygen-rich because of global warming. And oxygen deprivation could become increasingly widespread across large regions of ocean between 2030 and 2040. Anyone who has ever kept a home aquarium knows that, in the summer, the fish in the tank are more likely to...

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3 Disturbing Facts You Need to Know If You Eat Sashimi...

May 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment One in three pieces of sashimi is from fish caught by Taiwanese fishing vessels. And that spells trouble. By Yen Ning / Greenpeace   VIA ALTERNET Phetchaburi – September 7 – Local vendors are collecting fish in famous fishing village, which 90% of foreign workers is Burmese. September 7, 2014 Phetchaburi Thailand Photo Credit: SARAPON/Shutterstock   If you eat imported seafood, chances are you’ve eaten Taiwan caught fish, so when we’re talking Taiwanese seafood, we’re talking about an industry that has an impact on all of us.   Tuna transshipment on the high seas in the Indian Ocean. In a race to make as much profit as possible, Taiwan’s fishing industry has long been linked to environmental abuse. But what is becoming clearer is that where there are environmental abuse, human rights abuses...

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HOW WILL WE FEED THE MEGACITIES OF THE FUTURE?...

May 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] More people are moving to urban areas, and making new connections with rural farmers will be necessary to feed them. Urban agriculture in the Tenderloin neighborhood of San Francisco. (Photo: Sergio Ruiz via SPUR/Flickr) Tove Danovich is a journalist based in New York City.   Urban farms may provide a delicious source of delicate salad greens, honey, and even the occasional eggs, but they’re a long way from feeding entire cities. As rural areas continue to house much of the world’s poor, the question of who feeds these dense, agriculture-scarce areas becomes even more important. Linking small or subsistence farmers to urban markets could provide a way out of poverty for them, as well as opportunities for developing better infrastructure, creating new jobs along the way. More people already live in urban areas...

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AS CLIMATE DISRUPTION ADVANCES, U.N. WARNS: “THE FUTURE IS HAPPENING NOW”...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Dahr Jamail,TRUTHOUT.org Each month as I write these dispatches, I shake my head in disbelief at the rapidity at which anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) is occurring. It’s as though each month I think, “It can’t possibly keep happening at this incredible pace.” But it does. By late April, the Mauna Loa Observatory, which monitors atmospheric carbon dioxide, recorded an incredible daily reading: 409.3 parts per million. That is a range of atmospheric carbon dioxide content that this planet has not seen for the last 15 million years, and 2016 is poised to see these levels only continue to increase. To see more stories like this, visit “Planet or Profit?” Recently, Dr. James Hansen, a former NASA scientist and longtime whistleblower about the impending dangers of ACD, published a paper with several colleagues...

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How a Virginia Nonprofit Is Helping Veterans Launch Careers in Farming...

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Food The innovative program tackles two issues: the aging population of farmers and military veterans looking for new careers. By Lani Furbank / Food Tank  VIA ALTERNET Old farmer displays his American pride by holding the U.S. flag Photo Credit: Brocreative/Shutterstock A nonprofit organization in Virginia has designed a potentially beneficial solution to two looming social issues in American society: the aging population of farmers and military veterans looking for new careers. The Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food and Agriculture’s Veteran Farmer Program aims to develop a new cohort of farmers by providing opportunities and support to veterans. The Center excels at community-focused programming that provides access to healthy food and establishes connections between local farms and consumers in the D.C. metro area. These programs include a Mobile Market that distributes produce to underserved communities and...

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THIRTY WAYS CHERNOBYL AND THE DYING NUCLEAR INDUSTRY THREATEN OUR SURVIVAL...

Apr 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]     (Photo: Fi Dot)HARVEY WASSERMAN OF ECOWATCH FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT Article reprinted with permission from EcoWatch April 26 marks the 30th anniversary of the catastrophic explosion at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. It comes as Germany, which is phasing out all its reactors, has asked Belgium to shut two of its nukes because of the threat of terrorism. It also comes as advancing efficiencies and plunging prices in renewable energy remind us that nukes stand in the way of solving our climate crisis. And it makes us remember the second and third biggest lies told us by the atomic power industry: that no commercial nuke could explode, and that no one would be harmed by reactor fallout. Prior to the 1986 disaster at Chernobyl, there was at least one minor explosion (on March...

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KANSAS GOVERNOR JUSTIFIED KICKING 15,000 PEOPLE OFF FOOD STAMPS...

Apr 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alan Pyke THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/John Hanna) Gov. Sam Brownback (R-KS)   For over five years now, Kansas has served as an economic policy experiment for anti-tax, small-government conservatives. Their lab work is costing the state hundreds of millions of dollars, crippling public service budgets, and making life harder for low-income families without reducing the state’s poverty rate at all. With his political star beginning to tarnish, Gov. Sam Brownback (R) came to Washington on Wednesday to discuss his poverty policies at the conservative American Enterprise Institute. At one point, the embattled governor justified his policy of forcing people off of food stamps if they can’t find a job by likening low-income and jobless people to lazy college students. The event was convened around a policy he pioneered: Reinstating a rigid...

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The Creepy Way Processed Food Packaging Messes With Your Hormones...

Apr 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] A new study shows common plastic packaging steeps food in industrial chemicals. By April M. Short / AlterNet As if it weren’t already enough of a headache to find non-toxic, safe and healthy food to eat, a recent study published in the journal Environmental Health Perspective reveals that the packaging used to contain certain food products can impact your hormones. Researchers for the study found that people who eat more fast food have significantly increased rates of phthalates—industrial chemicals used to make plastics—in their systems. The study authors attribute the trend to those chemicals seeping from plastic packaging into foods. The study asked 8,877 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examinations Surveys between 2003 and 2010 to report all the food they had eaten within last 24 hours. Participants also donated a urine sample...

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CLIMATE CHANGE MAY TURN CROPS INTO JUNK FOOD...

Apr 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY   Tove Danovich is a journalist based in New York City. Rising CO2 levels will make plants produce more carbohydrates and fewer nutrients and protein. (Photos: Neil Howard/Flickr; Lew Robertson/Getty Images)   Plants love carbon dioxide. Higher levels of CO2 in the air increase the rate of photosynthesis—it’s why planting more trees helps to clean the air, after all. For a time, that love had some scientists convinced that the world’s greenery could keep CO2 levels in the atmosphere in check—but research has now shown not only that plants alone can’t halt the rise of CO2 but that the increase will make food crops less healthy for human consumption. According to one new study, higher carbon dioxide levels could turn healthy fruits and veggies into junk food. According to a report...

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Climate Will Become the Most Dominant Factor in Human Health, but We Are Woefully Ill-Prepared...

Apr 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate change is the ticking time bomb in global public health that is being ignored. What needs to be done? By Susie Pearn / AlterNet   MILAN MALPENSA – NOVEMBER 12, 2014: Ebola emergency simulation in Malpensa. A bogus infected patient has arrived in the airport, and then carried to “Sacco Hospital” by a special modified ambulance. Photo Credit: Davide Calabresi / Shutterstock.com The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 140,000 people die annually as a direct result of the climate change that has occurred since the 1970s. As the Earth’s temperature continues to rise, we will fast reach a tipping point where the climate will be the most dominant influence on human health and our health systems, far outstripping current drivers such as the aging population and lifestyle related diseases. By 2050,...

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INTENSE FARMING PRACTICES CAN HELP SAVE WILDLIFE...

Apr 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Human population growth means we need to farm more efficiently so we don’t plow what’s left of the world’s natural habitat. (Photo: Chris Winsor/Getty Images) Richard Conniff is the author of House of Lost Worlds: Dinosaurs, Dynasties, and the Story of Life on Earth, and other books.   You probably don’t think agricultural intensification could ever be a good thing. And you certainly wouldn’t expect an argument for more of it in a column about wildlife. But here’s the deal: If we don’t figure out how to grow more food on less land, we’re going to have to plow under what little remains of the natural world and turn it into farmland. And we have to figure it out fast, because there are going to be 10 billion people to...

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WHY WORLD LEADERS ARE TERRIFIED OF WATER SHORTAGES...

Apr 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] From Yemen to Syria to Arizona, droughts are a growing threat. —By Nathan Halverson MOTHER JONES WVillagers ride donkeys to get water in Yemen in 2012. Yemen is one of the most arid countries in the world and relies almost exclusively on groundwater and rainfall for its water supply. Mohammed Mohammed/Xinhua/ZUMA This story was originally published by Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Subscribe to the podcast and learn more at revealnews.org. Secret conversations between American diplomats show how a growing water crisis in the Middle East destabilized the region, helping spark civil wars in Syria and Yemen, and how those water shortages are spreading to the United States. Classified US cables reviewed by Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting...

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WASTED FOOD LAYS A HEAVY BURDEN ON THE CLIMATE...

Apr 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TRUTHDIG  Tim Radford     About one-third of all food produced never reaches a plate. (Taz via Flickr) This Creative Commons licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—By mid-century, an estimated one-tenth of all greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture could be traced back to food waste, according to new research. Human use and misuse of land accounts for up to a quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions, and farming directly contributes at least 10%, and perhaps twice as much. Yet roughly one-third of all food produced never makes it to the plate. “Reducing food waste can contribute to fighting hunger, but to some extent also prevent climate impacts like more intense weather extremes and sea-level rise,” says lead author Ceren Hic, a scientific assistant at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact...

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Meet Monsanto’s Evil Twin, an Industry That Does Major Damage and Gets Shockingly Little Attention...

Apr 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Food Chemical fertilizer pollutes the environment, disrupts the climate and damages human and animal health. By Martha Rosenberg, Ronnie Cummins / AlterNet Farmer fertilizing wheat with nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium fertilizer Photo Credit: oticki/Shutterstock What do you know about the worldwide chemical fertilizer industry? If you’re like most people, not much. There’s plenty of press coverage and consumer awareness when it comes to genetically engineered food and crops and the environmental hazards of pesticides and animal drugs. But the fertilizer industry? Not so much, even though it’s the largest segment of corporate agribusiness ($175 billion in annual sales), and a major destructive force in polluting the environment, disrupting the climate and damaging public health. Learning the facts about chemical fertilizers and the companies that produce them will give you yet another reason to boycott...

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Infographic: How Ocean Pollution Impacts Marine Life—and All of Us...

Apr 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Much of the plastic we produce ends up in the ocean, where it kills fish, sea turtles and marine mammals. By Torben Lonne / AlterNet Environmental Pollution – A discarded white plastic bags drifts over a tropical coral reef Photo Credit: Richard Whitcombe/Shutterstock The world’s oceans are a magical, diverse and abundant ecosystem that mankind needs in order to survive. The oceans cover over 72 percent of the planet’s surface, provide over 97 percent of the world’s water supply and over 70 percent of the oxygen we breathe. We have so much to thank the oceans for; however, they are threatened daily by natural and manmade pollution. Ocean pollution comes in many forms, but the largest factor affecting the oceans is plastic. Over the last decade, we have produced more plastic than...

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Move Over Pesticides: Could Traditional Plants Hold the Secret to Saving Crops From Pests?...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Researchers are building on age-old practices to reduce food loss in Africa. By Rachel Cernansky / Ensia   VIA ALTERNET BUIKWE REGION, UGANDA – JULY 26: An unidentified farmers working on their fields on July 26, 2004 in Buikwe region, Uganda. People in rural areas of Uganda depend on farming. Photo Credit: Pecold/Shutterstock Without any effort at all, Hawa Saidi Ibura crushes dried beans, one at a time, between her fingers outside her home in Endagaw, a village in northern Tanzania. She’s holding a basket of a type of red bean eaten all over East Africa, but these beans are skeletons of what they once were. She harvested them from her farm less than a year ago, but insects have since ravaged her storage room—eating the nutrition out of the beans and out...

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POVERTY IS NOW A REGIONAL PROBLEM...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green Abandoned homes in West Baltimore / Reddit Inequality is only growing across the U.S. as incomes continue to diverge. This disparity is now becoming geographic, as cities and suburbs see a “spatial pulling apart” into rich and poor zones. Poverty is now a regional problem. To close the gap, Elizabeth Kneebone, a fellow at the Brookings Institution, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Mayor of Baltimore, and Mark Updegrove, director of the LBJ Presidential Library, discussed possible solutions at SXSW Interactive in Austin, Texas. According to Kneebone, one impact of the Great Recession was the erosion of incomes at the bottom. “Poor people have become poorer.” This trend is seen even more strongly for people of color. “The income gap for people of color is much greater.” As the poor are further...

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One-Third of All Food Produced Globally Never Finds Its Way Onto a Plate...

Apr 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Food The majority of food waste ends up in landfills where it releases methane, a greenhouse gas 21 times stronger than carbon dioxide, into the atmosphere. By Nicole Mormann / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET April 8, 2016 It’s easy not to think about food waste when your rotting tomatoes and days-old casserole dishes are hidden away in the back of the refrigerator—out of sight, out of mind. But when it comes time to clean it out, you have to face a lot of waste food, money and the resources that took to produce it. While food waste has made a rapid rise in terms of public awareness recently, new research suggests that the future effect could end up accelerating climate changeat a worrisome rate in coming years. According to a study released Thursday by Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact...

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FOR THE FIRST TIME, A STATE JUST BANNED NEONICOTINOIDS, A PESTICIDE THREATENING POLLINATORS...

Apr 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Bonnie Raindrop has been beekeeping for just nine years, but that’s been more than enough time to see the precipitous decline in bee populations that has been plaguing Maryland. Last year, according to the USDA, Maryland beekeepers lost 61 percent of their honeybee populations, which is two times higher than the national average. Over the last five or so years, Raindrop herself has witnessed crushing losses in her own hives, fluctuating between 50 and 100 percent. Which is why Raindrop is so happy that the Maryland legislature has started to take notice. Thursday night, the Maryland House and Senate agreed upon and jointly passed a final version of the Maryland Pollinator Protection Act, which would eliminate consumer use of neonicotinoids, a widely-used class of pesticides...

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CORPORATE AND POLITICAL CORRUPTION: THE LESSONS NOT LEARNED FROM THE DEEPWATER HORIZON DISASTER...

Apr 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] 0 By Farron Cousins, DeSmogBlog | Op-Ed Day 30 of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico; June 1, 2010. (Photo: Green Fire Productions) As we approach the six-year anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion that killed 11 people and devastated much of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem, recent news stories paint a very clear picture that no one has learned anything from this disaster. On Monday of this week, the US Department of Justice announced that BP will pay $20 billion in civil and federal penalties and fines resulting from its role in the oil spill. This total amount was approved by Judge Carl Barbier who has overseen much of the litigation from the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Judge Barbier ordered that the $20 billion, which includes a $5.5 billion Clean Water Act...

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CRAZY CLIP SHOWS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU CONNECT GAS BAGS TO COWS – METHANE...

Apr 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Discovery VIA GRIST This story was originally published by Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Cows are gassy beasts. And this gas is bad for the planet. Last year, my colleague Josh Harkinson detailed just how dangerous this gas has become in our atmosphere: Cows are already the nation’s single largest source of methane, a greenhouse gas produced by oil extraction, decomposing trash, and the guts of grazing animals that’s as much as 105 times more potent than carbon dioxide. A single cow farts and belches enough methane to match the carbon equivalent of the average car. According to a 2006 United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization report, the world’s 1.4 billion cows produce 18 percent of the world’s greenhouse gases — more than the entire...

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SHRIMP SOUND OCEAN ACIDITY ALARM...

Apr 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     The snapping shrimp is the noisiest marine creature in coastal ecosystems. (Tullio Ross/University of Adelaide) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The slow change in water chemistry as more and more atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolves in the sea and causes acidification could make the oceans much less noisy and slow the growth of life at the sea’s margins. In one study, Australian scientists warn that as the acidity levels grow, the snapping shrimp may grow ever quieter. And in another study, Californian scientists have tested the water chemistry in coastal rock pools and discovered that they become most corrosive at night. The snapping shrimp is the loudest invertebrate in the ocean. It forms bubbles in its snapping claw and...

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We’ve Changed a Life-Giving Nutrient Into a Deadly Pollutant—Can We Change It Back?...

Apr 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment In the process of producing food, we’ve inadvertently filled our planet with toxic forms of nitrogen. By Elizabeth Grossman / Ensia   VIA ALTERNET A lot of dead fish on the beach Photo Credit: Brandon Seidel/Shutterstock Coastal dead zones, global warming, excess algae blooms, acid rain, ocean acidification, smog, impaired drinking water quality, an expanding ozone hole and biodiversity loss. Seemingly diverse problems, but a common thread connects them: human disruption of how a single chemical element, nitrogen, interacts with the environment. Nitrogen is absolutely crucial to life — an indispensable ingredient of DNA, proteins and essentially all living tissue — yet it also can choke the life out of aquatic ecosystems, destroy trees and sicken people when it shows up in excess at the wrong place, at the wrong time, in...

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5 Disturbing Facts Big Food Doesn’t Want You to Know...

Apr 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] A few inconvenient truths you might need to know before tucking into that next bite of shrimp, beef or bacon. By Martha Rosenberg / AlterNet April 4, 2016 Photo Credit: Franck Boston / Shutterstock From mercury in tuna and wood pulp in parmesan cheese to ground beef treated with ammonia to retard E. coli (“pink slime”), the press does a good job exposing the dangerous and deceptive practices of Big Food. The problem is, the public forgets about the food risk or contamination, assuming that reform is in the works and that is just fine with Big Food. Often nothing changes. For example, many thought the problem of mercury in tuna had been solved since it has been so widely reported. But Time recently wrote “the latest analysis shows that eating fish the way the...

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GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS CAN THRIVE AS THE WORLD WARMS...

Apr 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Alex Kirby / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Rice harvesting in Indonesia. (Curt Caremark / World Bank via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Genetically engineering photosynthesis in plants could take advantage of rising global temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide, US scientists say. They believe this could achieve much higher yields on the same amount of land and help to stave off the prospect of widespread hunger as human populations increase. Researchers at the University of Illinois report in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B on their experiments with an enzyme that can determine the rate of photosynthesis—the way that plants use light to produce oxygen and organic compounds—and a molecule linked to plant growth They say field tests have shown that their...

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THE INSPIRING HEROES BATTLING THE HIDDEN POACHING EPIDEMIC...

Apr 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Members of an antipoaching squad employed by a private hunting concession in a wildlife reserve in Mozambique, November 2015. (Photo: Laura Krantz) Once upon a time, in a pristine forest with an abundance of wildlife, the people of a small village had plenty of food. They grew cassava, a staple starch, and supplemented that by fishing from the river and hunting in the surrounding forests. Then, one year, traders from distant logging towns arrived and offered the villagers money and goods in exchange for meat. The villagers agreed. For the next five or 10 years, they filled the traders’ canoes with the bounty of the forest and sent them back down the river, to the logging towns and to cities where the men took the meat to market. At first, hunters could still...

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Women Refugees in Europe Wallow in Filth and Starvation...

Apr 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Immigration The European Union cuts a shady new deal with Turkey. By Silja J.A. Talvi / AlterNet A woman carries her baby near the gate of a Greek-Macedonian border crossing near the Greek village of Idomeni, on March 6, 2016. Photo Credit: AFP Photo/Dimitar Dilkoff In the muddy, freezing border regions between Greece and Macedonia, in small villages like Idomeni, Greece, women refugees and their children are crying out for help on a daily basis. But most European leaders are unable or unwilling to see the torment in these women’s eyes. In Idomeni, about 14,000 immigrants are stranded without adequate food supplies, clothes, blankets or tents. Most of them are women and children who have not been able to bathe for weeks on end, many sharing tales of rape and sexual assault at...

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Attention Vegans: Your Salad Was Probably Grown With the Blood and Bones of Dead Animals...

Apr 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Photo Credit: Juan-Calderon/Flickr C If you want to eliminate animal products from your diet, stock-free farmers want your business. By Ari LeVaux / AlterNet Meat lovers will be forgiven if they feel like the wagons are circling around their protein of choice. The raising of animals for food has been implicated in a host of ethical, environmental, humanitarian and animal welfare problems, while eating animals is increasingly blamed for various health problems. Livestock production is widely considered responsible for some 18 percent or more of greenhouse gas emissions. That’s why the United Nations and several countries have formally recommended people eat less meat in order to curb the climate crisis. Meat probably gives you cancer, notes the World Health Organization, and contributes to world hunger, according to hunger advocates who point out...

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LOGGERHEAD, RIGHT WHALE BREEDING GROUNDS ARE ENTIRELY COVERED BY ATLANTIC BLASTING AREA...

Mar 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: Oceana Nearly the entire breeding areas for loggerhead turtles (purple, left) and North Atlantic right whales (red, right) would be affected.   A set of maps released Tuesday shows an incredible overlap between the critical habitats of several endangered and seafood species and the area that will be affected by seismic testing in the Atlantic Ocean. Significant portions of the habitats and breeding grounds for loggerhead turtles, right whales, swordfish, cod, wahoo, yellowfin tuna, and many other species would be impacted if the Obama administration approves permits for the testing, which could start as soon as this spring. The entire breeding areas for loggerheads and the North Atlantic right whale are covered by the testing area. During seismic testing, loud noises — so loud they can be...

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THIS PROGRAM WILL MAKE CUTTING CARBON EMISSIONS LUCRATIVE FOR FARMERS...

Mar 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Mark Isbell   When Mark Isbell, a third-generation rice farmer in central Arkansas, tallies up his profits for this year, he’ll count a few extra dollars from a unique source: the greenhouse gases that his 3,200-acre farm didn’t emit. Isbell is part of a small group of farmers participating in a new project piloted by the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), in conjunction with the USDA, and approved by the American Carbon Registry. The program encourages rice farmers in California and the Mid-South to adopt a series of greenhouse-gas mitigating practices on their fields by allowing them to cash in on the carbon emissions that they offset using California’s carbon market. “You always have to be looking forward,” Isbell told ThinkProgress. “It seems like this is the...

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