56 INDIGENOUS CORN VARIETIES AT RISK AS MONSANTO EYES MEXICO...

Jan 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Lorraine Chow  ECOWATCH Mexico’s unique and treasured native corn varieties could be under threat as Monsanto, the world’s largest seed producer, vies to plant genetically modified (GMO) corn in the country. In August 2015, a Mexican judged overturned a September 2013 ban on GMO corn, thus opening more business opportunities for Monsanto and other agribusinesses pending favorable later court decisions. Monsanto even announced in October 2015 that it was seeking to double its sales in the country over the next five years. Chef Pancho Ibanez of Mexico City-based restaurant Pujol. He joins roughly 80 other Mexican chefs who are speaking out against GMO corn. Photo credit: Financial Times The GMO corn ban remains pending a ruling on the appeal, but a final decision could end up in Mexico’s supreme court. Monsanto, which is seeking five permits to grow...

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On the News With Thom Hartmann: The FDA Has Only Banned Three Chemicals Out of Nearly 100 Known to Cause Health Risks, and More...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Thom Hartmann, The Thom Hartmann Program | Video Report In today’s On the News segment: There are nearly 100 chemicals used in food processing and packaging that pose a serious health risk, but the FDA is only banning three of these type of chemicals, which are no longer even in use; Greenland is losing about 8,000 tons of ice sheet every second; Germany just opened a superhighway that is only open to bikes; and more. See more news and opinion from Thom Hartmann at Truthout here. TRANSCRIPT: Thom Hartmann here – on the best of the rest of…. Science and green news…. You need to know this. There is a massive methane leak in California that you may not even know about. Since mid-October, a broken pipe located 8,000 feet below...

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KEYSTONE, FOOD LABELING CASES DEMONSTRATE TPP’S THREAT TO DEMOCRACY...

Jan 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Dave Johnson   AMERICANS FOR A SAFE FUTURE The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) has provisions that allow corporations to sue governments for laws and regulations that limit profits. The cases bypass national court systems and are heard by “corporate courts” with the governments allowed no appeal. These investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) provisions are also in trade agreements like the North American Free Trade Agreement. When fast-track trade promotion authority was being debated, people like Sen. Elizabeth Warren raised warning flags about the ISDS provisions in TPP. [. . .] In her letter, Warren raises concerns that the deal could include provisions that would allow foreign companies to challenge U.S. policies before a judicial panel outside the domestic legal system, increasing exposure of American taxpayers to potential damages. In May, President Obama said that concerns over...

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HEROIC FOOD FARM GIVES VETERANS A NEW MISSION AS FARMERS GROWING SUSTAINABLE FOOD...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] “To be a good farmer, you have to be really good at a lot of things,” says Leora Barish, founder of non-profit veteran farming organization Heroic Food. “What [people] don’t realize is that veterans are great for farms and farming and for our food supply because they have a work ethic like nobody’s business and they have the endurance and they have the mission drive and grit and everything else that are required to start a farm.” Barish started the Heroic Food Farm in the spring of 2015 as a vehicle for teaching and training military veterans in sustainable farming so that they can utilize their unique skills in a new way. Inhabitat recently visited the farm, located just outside of Hudson, NY, to find out more about its inspiring mission as the...

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GROWING POWER GROWS FISH, VEGGIES, AND COMMUNITY WITH AQUAPONIC FARM...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Greg Beach   INHABITAT Gardeners and farmers who live in colder climates are well aware of the limitations posed by a short growing season. But these challenges often yield outstanding innovative practices, such as those used by Growing Power in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Growing Power harnesses natural cycles to power a farm that produces over one million pounds of food every year. Because of its ultra efficient greenhouse system, Growing Power is able to continue its harvest even through the frigid Great Lakes winters. Will Allen, the founder of Growing Power, created an aquaponics system that captures energy produced by natural systems. The greenhouses are heated by indoor compost piles, which generate heat as they break down organic matter. These compost pile heaters are also an excellent source of fertile soil for growing high-quality vegetables...

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THERE’S A HUGE PROBLEM WITH THE NEW FOOD GUIDELINES THAT NO ONE IS TALKING ABOUT...

Jan 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] And it poses a big threat to health. —By Nick Stockton MOTHER JONES Climate change: It’s what’s for dinner. MaraZe/Shutterstock This story originally appeared in Wired and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Every five years, the government tries to tell Americans what to put in their bodies. Eat more vegetables. Dial back the fats. It’s all based on the best available science for leading a healthy life. But the best available science also has a lot to say about what those food choices do to the environment, and some researchers are peeved that new dietary recommendations released yesterday seem to utterly ignore that fact. Broadly, the 2016-2020 dietary recommendations aim for balance: More veggies, leaner meats, try some fish! Oh, and eat way less sugar, no more than...

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ANOTHER HOSTILE TAKEOVER AT THE MALHEUR WILDLIFE REFUGE....

Jan 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Emily Atkin CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Rick Bowmer Ammon Bundy and his group of armed occupiers are not the only ones invading the Malheur National Wildlife Regufe.   They’re holed up at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Burns, Oregon, and they’re unwelcome. There are too many to count. And no matter what the community does, they can’t seem to get rid of them. No, we’re not talking about the armed militia. We’re talking about the common carp. Yes, carp. The oily, invasive freshwater fish that’s displeasing to eat and even worse for the environment. The Malheur Wildlife Refuge has been battling an armed occupation of ranchers on its property for only six days, but it’s been waging a bigger, much more important war against carp for nearly a century. A common...

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WITH TWICE THE PROTEIN AS QUINOA, THE PULSE MIGHT BE THE YEAR’S NEW HOT “SUPERFOOD”...

Jan 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Global Pulse Confederation Market in Makalle, Tigray, Ethiopia   Move over, quinoa, kale, and açaí– 2016’s newest superfood might come in a familiar package (or can). Pulses — the dried edible seeds of legume plants, which include things like lentils, dried peas, and beans — are hoping to get their moment in the spotlight, thanks in part to a United Nations campaign to make 2016 the International Year of Pulses. Pulses have twice the protein of quinoa and require just 1/10 the amount of water needed to produce beef. Pulses are already a well-known entity outside of the developed world — according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, pulses make up nearly 75 percent of the average diet in developing countries. Nutritionally, pulses are a...

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IT’S PRACTICALLY IMPOSSIBLE TO DEFINE GMO’S...

Dec 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock WTF is a GMO? By Nathanael Johnson   GRIST Debates rage over what to do about genetically modified organisms, but we rarely stop to ask a more basic question: DoGMOs really exist? It’s an important question, because no one in this debate can tell you precisely what aGMO is. I’ve come to the conclusion that “GMO” is a cultural construct. It’s a metaphor we use to talk about a set of ideas. It doesn’t map neatly onto any clear category in the physical world.GMOs, like other cultural constructs — think of gender, or race — do have a basis in reality, of course: We can roughly define “male” or “Asian,” but when we try to regulate these divisions, all kinds of problems crop up. And definitions of “GMOs” are much messier — “nerd” might be a roughly...

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9 Spices That May Save Your Life...

Dec 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Personal Health Can cinnamon prevent diabetes? Just maybe. By Larry Schwartz / AlterNet   Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com If salt and pepper are all you are using to put some zip in your food, you are not only missing out on adding flavor to your meals, but maybe opportunities for a healthier, longer life. While spices may have begun as a way to enhance the taste of otherwise bland meats and vegetables (boiled mutton only went so far, we’re guessing), the ancients in China and the Far East used many of the spices medicinally for centuries. And it seems they were on to something. “There have been many recent studies validating the historic habit of using spices for health benefits,” Donna Tainter, author of Spices and Seasonings: A Food Technology Handbook, told the website SixWise.com. Modern science has indeed shown that many of...

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THE ‘UNFOLDING GLOBAL DISASTER’ HAPPENING RIGHT UNDER OUR FEET...

Dec 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   With all that’s going on in the world — from record-breaking warm spells to rapidly melting ice sheets — it’s easy to ignore something so seemingly mundane as dirt. But scientists at the University of Sheffield’s Grantham Center for Sustainable Futures suggest that we ignore dirt at our own peril. Nearly a third of the world’s arable land has been lost over the past four decades, according to a new report, released to coincide with the Paris climate talks earlier this month. Experts at the the University of Sheffield called this soil loss “an unfolding global disaster” that directly threatens the agricultural productivity of the planet. But soil erosion isn’t just a problem for food security — which is expected to become even more pressing...

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LAKES ARE HEATING UP, PUTTING FOOD AND WATER SUPPLY AT RISK...

Dec 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe Ethnic Intha fishermen dressed in customary attire with traditional fish-traps pretend to catch fish for tourists to take pictures as a real fisherman catches fish in the background in Inle lake, northeastern Shan state, Myanmar.   While pretty much every aspect of the global ecosystem has been heating up, freshwater lakes are warming faster than the oceans or the air, according to a new study from NASA and the National Science Foundation. Researchers looked at 235 lakes around the world over the past 25 years and found that, on average, they are gaining a third of a degree (Celsius) every decade. The study, which used onsite measurements and satellite temperature data, found that warming was most pronounced in northern and tropical regions. “These results...

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HOW CONGRESS’ CRAZY OMNIBUS SPENDING PACKAGE WILL CHANGE WHAT WE EAT...

Dec 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Nathanael Johnson   GRIST In this era of asymmetrical polarization it seems like laws can only pass in one of two ways: as a massive political effort by one party, overwhelming the best efforts of the other party to stop it (like Obamacare); or as part of a massive bundle of legislation, so that all factions get something they really want — even if they also have to vote for something they hate. The federal funding omnibus, which President Obama signed Friday, is an example of the latter. The bill is just over 2,000 pages long and contains all sorts of miscellaneous legislation, much of which the nation is still sorting through and figuring out. (You don’t really think Congress tells people what’s in these bills before it passes them, do you?) Here’s what it...

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SEVEN REASONS 2015 WAS THE SWEETEST YEAR YET FOR SAVING BEES...

Dec 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Thanks to policy changes and pesticide bans, the dwindling bee population is finally getting some much-needed protection. (Photo: Flickr) Dec 15, 2015 Nicole Mormann is TakePart’s editorial fellow. She covers a variety of topics, including social justice, entertainment, lifestyle, and environment.   We may have run for the hills as kids if we saw a few bees buzzing nearby, but without them, we wouldn’t have been able to enjoy some important staple foods growing up: Apples, avocados, almonds, blueberries, cherries, and pumpkins—these are just a sampling of the many crops that rely on the pollination power of bees. Bees pollinate more than $15 billion worth of U.S. crops each year, and yet massive bee die-offs in recent years are costing the economy an estimated $5.7 billion annually, not to mention the possible loss...

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The New GMO Apple Is a Health Hazard, but the USDA Approved It Anyway...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Food Even the apple industry is opposed to what detractors have dubbed the “botox apple.” Center for Food Safety VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: wk1003mike/Shutterstock.com After decades of promises from the biotech industry that genetically engineered (GE) food would feed the world, cure the sick, reduce agricultural dependence on toxic chemicals, and save countless crops from imminent collapse, the U.S. Department of Agriculture approved a product they think will solve a problem humans have struggled with for centuries… an apple that doesn’t brown when you slice it… Seriously; we couldn’t make this stuff up. While these GE apples are a waste of time and money, we don’t want to downplay the real concerns about them. Pre-sliced apples are actually a frequently recalled food product. Once the whole fruit is sliced, it has an increased risk...

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Dozens of Nations Back Regenerative Farming Initiative That Can Help Solve Global Warming...

Dec 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Food The U.S.—a primary driver of the climate crisis—still isn’t on board with this historic climate agreement. By Katherine Paul, Ronnie Cummins / AlterNet Photo Credit: GlebStock/Shutterstock.com France, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, the U.K., Germany and Mexico are among more than two dozen countries that have signed on to an agreement that one day may be recognized as the most significant climate initiative in history.France’s 4/1000 Initiative: Soils for Food Security and Climate puts regenerative food and farming front and center in the climate solutions conversation. This is why the Organic Consumers Association, its Mexico affiliate Via Organica, IFOAM Organics International and more than 50 other activist allies across the globe have signed on in support of the Initiative. Unfortunately, the U.S. government is not yet on board with the plan, even though our...

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VIDEO: What Does Climate Change Have to Do With Hunger in America?...

Dec 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By The Nation On October 27, 2015, the Sacramento Public Library hosted a discussion in honor of The Nation‘s 150th anniversary. In this recording, you’ll see Nation contributor Sasha Abramsky expose just how many Americans go hungry every day in a country that produces more food than any other. Nation environment correspondent Mark Hertsgaard unravels the myth of food scarcity in the face of climate change. Amber Stott, director of Sacramento’s Food Literacy Center  reveals how malnutrition in our own backyards are making children susceptible to previously adult diseases. Chanowk Yisrael, founder of Yisrael Family Urban Farm, outlines his transition from the tech industry to urban agriculture, and the impact of gentrification on food deserts. Lesley McClurg, food and sustainability reporter for Capital Public Radio, moderates the...

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THE NATIVE AMERICAN COMMUNITY FACES DANGEROUSLY HIGH RATES OF FOOD INSECURITY...

Dec 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Health by Alex Zielinski THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock/Image by Dylan Petrohilos   It’s been nearly 400 years since the Wampanoag people encountered the starving, cold pilgrims in Plymouth Bay. With an already thriving agricultural model in fertile Massachusetts, the Indigenous tribe taught the uneducated British settlers how to cultivate their own food, eventually culminating in a three-day-long shared meal celebrating the harvest — and securing the future of colonial expansion in the United States. That historical event, which will be memorialized at Thanksgiving tables across the country this week, reflects the fact that Native American tribes were once the most agriculturally prosperous groups of people in the U.S. But a lot has changed over the past several centuries. Now, new studies find that 60 percent of counties with a native majority face dangerously...

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How the TPP Fulfills Big Ag’s Wish List...

Dec 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The deeply flawed agreement compromises food safety and public health — and opens the possibility for private corporations setting food standards. By Debbie Barker / Center for Food Safety VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Lightspring/Shutterstock.com The highly anticipated text of the Trans-Pacific Trade Partnership (TPP), negotiated by 12 countries representing around 40 percent of the global economy, was released on November 12. Center for Food Safety (CFS) is reviewing the agreement consisting of 30 chapters and more than 2,000 pages to assess potential impacts on food safety, genetically engineered foods and crops, food labeling, pesticides and other chemical usage, intellectual property rights pertaining to seeds and pharmaceuticals, and other public health and environmental issues. An initial review reveals that the agreement compromises food safety and public health, notably through measures pertaining to U.S. border inspection...

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DESIGN WITH EVERY BEE IN MIND

Nov 21, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Heidi Petersen The natural habitats of pollinators are increasingly fragmented. The overwhelming majority of American agricultural landscapes use chemical pesticides and fertilizers. These factors contribute to the declining health of bees. At the ASLA 2015 Annual Meeting in Chicago, Heather Holm, Holm Design and Consulting; Danielle Bilot, Associate ASLA, Kudela & Weinheimer; Laurie Davies, executive director of the Pollinator Partnership; and James Schmelzer, building operations and management, General Services Administration (GSA) showed how landscape architects and designers can better design for bees. As Holm explained, 81 percent of plants are pollinated by insects, birds, or mammals. Of those plants, 33 percent are food crops. Most people’s idea of a pollinator is the honeybee, a domesticated insect integral to modern U.S. agriculture. Hives of these bees are shipped throughout the country,...

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RECORD HEAT PUTS AUSTRALIA AT RISK OF INTENSE FIRE SEASON...

Nov 21, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By MICHELLE INNIS  NYTIMES Photo A fire east of Esperance in Western Australia this week. A prolonged fire season could strain the largely volunteer firefighting forces in Australia and destroy crops, livestock and farms. Credit Department of Fire and Emergency/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images   SYDNEY, Australia — A fire that raged this week across hundreds of thousands of acres of grasslands and about-to-be harvested wheat crops, killing a farmer and three workers, points to a dangerous summer ahead in Australia, scientists and weather watchers say. From Our Advertisers The fire, in the south of Western Australia, began last weekend after lightning struck about 12 miles north of the township of Esperance. It was flaring six days later after burning through 580 square miles of farmland, fanned by temperatures above 100 degrees and...

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CLIMATE CHANGE HELPS ALASKANS GROW ORGANIC FOOD ON THE TUNDRA...

Nov 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Bethel, Alaska.    Andrea Pokrzywinski By Kate Yoder    GRIST Between fighting wildfires and rerouting the Iditarod, Alaska has had a tough time with climate change. But at least there’s one good outcome: local food. In Bethel, a town in southwestern Alaska, farmer Tim Meyers is taking advantage of rising temperatures to grow food in the previously inhospitable tundra. NPR reports: At the 15-acre organic farm, which has been operating for more than a decade, Meyers is growing crops like strawberries in greenhouses. But he says as temperatures warm due to climate change, it’s easier to grow things like potatoes, cabbages and kale right in the ground, outside. “Years ago, it was hard freeze and below zero up to the third week in May,” he says. “We haven’t had any of that this winter.” Meyers...

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A SCORCHING EARTH THREATENS U.S. AGRICULTURE...

Nov 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network/  VIA TRUTHDIG     Wildfires such as this one in Arizona pose a serious risk to topsoil. (Brady Smith / U.S. Forest Service / Coconino via Flickr) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—A deadly mix of prolonged drought and wildfire, driven by climate change, could do more than just lay waste to crops and woodland in the western US. It could scorch the earth and trigger ever greater levels of soil erosion. Joel Sankey a researcher at the US Geological Survey, told the Geological Society of America’s annual meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, that by 2050 an increase in wildfires may double soil erosion in some western states. As a consequence, soil would blow or be washed into water courses. He and his...

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TERRACE FARMING: AN INDIGENOUS MODEL FOR FOOD SECURITY...

Nov 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Marianela Jarroud, Inter Press Service | Report Terraces built by Atacameño Indians in the village of Caspana in Alto Loa, in the northern Chilean region of Antofagasta. This ageold farming technique represents an adaptation to the climate, and ensures the right to food of these Andes highlands people. (Photo: Marianela Jarroud / IPS) Caspana, Chile – Terrace farming as practiced from time immemorial by native peoples in the Andes mountains contributes to food security as a strategy of adaptation in an environment where the geography and other conditions make the production of nutritional foods a complex undertaking. This ancient prehispanic technique, still practiced in vast areas of the Andes highlands, including Chile, “is very important from the point of view of adaptation to the climate and the ecosystem,” said Fabiola Aránguiz. “By...

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CLIMATE CHANGE WILL STRESS OUT PLANTS. THESE SCIENTISTS THINK THEY HAVE A SOLUTION...

Nov 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Rusty Rodriguez and Regina Redman Industrial Evolution By Suzanne Jacobs   GRIST Just east of the University of Washington campus, along a busy thoroughfare, behind a rundown strip of retail space, up a flight of rusty stairs, there’s a glass door. Inside, past a cramped office overflowing with books, a couple of computers, and a bare-bones kitchen, there’s a lab.This, a hole in the wall on the north edge of Seattle, is where plants go to get superpowers. And by superpowers, I mean a fungal infection. But trust me — this is like the radioactive spider bite of fungal infections. It all started more than 15 years ago, when Rusty Rodriguez and Regina Redman, a husband-and-wife team of biologists, went to Yellowstone National Park to study the microbes living in hot geothermal soils. They wanted...

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6 Surprising Health Benefits of Hemp Seeds...

Nov 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Hemp is not just for stoners anymore. By Larry Schwartz / AlterNet Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com Among the many benefits of the legalization of marijuana would be eliminating any lingering confusion about the legality of its close relation (read, basically the same plant), hemp. While the possession of industrial hemp, also known by its botanical moniker, Cannabis sativa, has never been illegal, the growing of industrial hemp was illegal until the recent passage of the 2014 Farm Bill. The hemp that is mostly illegal, with the exception, at this writing, of four states and the District of Columbia, the kind of hemp you smoke, put in brownies, and usually have a good ol’ time after imbibing, contains a high concentration (three percent or more) of THC, the ingredient that induces the familiar Rocky Mountain...

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HOW WASHINGTON TRANSFORMED ITS DYING OYSTER INDUSTRY INTO A CLIMATE SUCCESS STORY...

Oct 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Wikimedia Netarts Bay, in Oregon, where Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery is located.   When Alan Barton first arrived at Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery in 2007, he wasn’t expecting to stay very long. The hatchery — the second-largest in the United States — was in trouble, suffering from historically high mortality rates for their microscopic oyster larvae. But Barton knew that in the oyster industry, trouble is just another part of the job. As manager of the oyster breeding program at Oregon State University, he had already helped one oyster larvae breeding operation navigate through some tough years in 2005, when a bacterial infection appeared to be causing problems for their seeds. To combat the issue, he had created a treatment system that could remove vibrio tubiashii, an...

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COULD BEER SAVE THE HONEYBEES?

Oct 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: wikimedia commons   The fight to save honeybees has gotten boosts recently from the USDA, the White House, and researchers who are still working to determine why managed honeybees continue to die off. Now, bees have one more thing on their side: beer. Or, at least, one of the main ingredients of beer. This week, the EPA approved the use of potassium salts of hops beta acids (HBAs) — a biochemical (or naturally-occurring) pesticide that’s derived from hops, the flowers of the plant Humulus lupulus — around honeycombs. Research has shown that HBAs have potential for repelling varroa mites, a dangerous mite that attaches itself to honeybees and sucks out their circulatory fluid. Varroa mites weaken bees and spread debilitating diseases, including deformed wing virus, which causes...

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WHAT AQUACULTURE ACTUALLY IS AND HOW IT’S BENEFITING GREECE...

Oct 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] HUFFINGTON POST Aquaculture is commonly defined as the farming of aquatic plants and animals, essentially agriculture at sea. The advent of aquaculture dates back millennia. Evidence of fish capture and on-growing in ponds and lagoons date back to more than 2000 years ago while friezes from ancient Egyptian tombs (tomb of Aktihep) show tilapia being harvested from ponds as far back as 2500BC. In China, the world’s largest aquaculture producing nation, the tradition of raising carp in ponds dates back to 2000BC. There is evidence of extensive marine farms in the 6th century BC in Etruscan culture and in Roman times sea bass, sea bream, mullets and oysters were cultivated in ponds and lagoons in Italy. In the 12th century there was a resurgence of freshwater aquaculture in central Europe. In the 15th...

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6 Food Giants That Have Caved in to Consumer Demand to Be Healthier...

Oct 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Food Consumers increasingly want fresh, natural and minimally processed food — and food companies are responding. By Katherine Harris / Food Tank  VIA ALTERNET October 8, 2015 In his Six Rules for Eating Wisely, author Michael Pollan cautions against consuming foods that our great-great-great grandmothers wouldn’t recognize. However, that’s often easier said than done. While a 2015 Nielsen survey indicates that an increasing number of Americans want fresh, natural, and minimally processed foods, Azodicarbonamide, also known as the yoga mat chemical, has been identified in almost 500 food products. Still, the tides are turning as fast casual restaurants, fast food chains, and even multinationals are responding to pressure, especially from Millennials, for food made without artificial ingredients. Here are six leading food companies that are changing their ways for the better. 1. Chipotle...

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