BIZARRE & DISTURBING HURRICANE ALEX FORMS IN ATLANTIC, HURRICAN PALI IN PACIFIC IN JANUARY...

Jan 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By FishOutofWater  VIA DAILY KOS   Hurricane Pali Tues Jan 12, 2016 near EQUATOR SW of Hawaii. Pali was the earliest hurricane to form in the central & eastern Pacific. Hurricane Pali is heading where no hurricane has gone before, within 5 degrees of the equator in the north central Pacific. Forecasters have been stunned by Pali. Tropical storms generally don’t form near the equator because they can’t develop enough spin there but a phenomenal atmospheric wave moved eastward along the equator all the way from the Indian ocean to the eastern Pacific over the last month. That massive wave of thunderstorms on both sides of the equator built a strong surge of westerly winds on the equator as it moved east. When those west winds reached the central Pacific where the Northeasterly...

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The Arctic Is Melting at a Record Pace — and It’s Having a Scary Impact on Global Weather...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Scientists warn that we are entering uncharted territory when it comes to the loss of Arctic sea ice. By Dahr Jamail / Truthout   VIA ALTERNET Arctic sea ice is melting at a record pace – and every summer looks grimmer. This past summer saw the ice pack at its fourth-lowest level on record, and the overall trend in recent decades suggests this will only continue. “Using satellites, scientists have found that the area of sea ice coverage each September has declined by more than 40 percent since the late 1970s, a trend that has accelerated since 2007,” according to the recent report “Arctic Matters: The Global Connection to Changes in the Arctic” by the National Research Council of the National Academies. The report added that by the end of each of the eight summers...

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SEVERE WEATHER BEFORE CHRISTMAS KILLS TEN, DISRUPTS U.S. TRAVEL...

Dec 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] U.S. By Stav Ziv NEWSWEEK Photographed through raindrops on a window, an airliner arrives at Reagan National Airport in Washington, December 23, 2015. Unseasonably warm, wet and foggy weather is causing travel delays to many cities along the East Coast. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters U.S. Weather Tornado storm Travel Christmas Updated | At least ten people, including a seven-year-old boy and a teenaged girl, were killed Wednesday when storms and tornadoes ripped through the south and midwest. More than a dozen tornadoes touched down in Mississippi, according to a preliminary report, Storm Prediction Center meteorologist Matt Mosier told CBS News. A tornado that touched down in Holly Springs was responsible for the death of the boy—who authorities said was with family inside a car that got picked up by the storm—and one other person in...

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HOW CLIMATE CHANGE IS WREAKING HAVOC ON THE AMERICAN EMPIRE...

Dec 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environmental changes are splintering the power structure. By Tom Engelhardt / Tom Dispatch   Photo Credit: Bruce Rolff / Shutterstock To stay on top of important articles like these, sign up to receive the latest updates from TomDispatch.com here.   For six centuries or more, history was, above all, the story of the great game of empires. From the time the first wooden ships mounted with cannons left Europe’s shores, they began to compete for global power and control.  Three, four, even five empires, rising and falling, on an increasingly commandeered and colonized planet. The story, as usually told, is a tale of concentration and of destruction until, in the wake of the second great bloodletting of the twentieth century, there were just two imperial powers left standing: the United States and the Soviet Union....

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SOUTHERN INDIA IS HIT WITH DEADLY FLOODING AFTER WETTEST DECEMBER DAY IN V100 YEARS...

Dec 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo Volunteers rescue flood affected people on a country boat from a residential area in Chennai, India, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2015.   Extreme rainfall in southern India has killed nearly 270 people and displaced about a million more, as flooding causes major problems in the state of Tamil Nadu. Chennai, the capital of Tamil Nadu and fourth-most-populous city in India, experienced its wettest December day in over a century this week, according to AccuWeather. That follows a November that brought the city 300 percent more rain than is usual for the month. Monsoon winds typically bring rainfall to Chennai during October, November, and December, but rainfall this year has been exceptional — the city and surrounding region has gotten more than 11 inches of rainfall over...

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Slow-Motion Disaster: New York Prepares for Up to Six Feet of Sea Level Rise...

Nov 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By the end of the century, LaGuardia Airport will have fish swimming where airplanes once parked. By Bobby Magill / Climate Central   VIA ALTERNET November 3, 2015   Photo Credit: Matthew Kraus/Flickr LaGuardia Airport is about to be rebuilt in New York City, but by the end of the century, fish could be swimming where airplanes once parked at the terminal. That’s because sea levels in the area could rise by as much as 6 feet over the next 75 years, according to new predictions released by the state of New York.   The flooded Battery Park Tunnel in New York City following Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. (image: Timothy Krause/Flickr) New York State environment officials announced Friday that they’re creating new sea level rise regulations that will help coastal communities build more...

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SUPER STORMS KEEP COMING AS YEMEN AND OMAN BRACE FOR CYCLONE CHAPALA...

Nov 2, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Published on Sunday, November 01, 2015 by Common Dreams Expected to make landfall on Monday, storm is already creating waves taller than 30 feet and could unleash more rain in two days than these areas usually see over several years Jon Queally, staff writer Given the ongoing civil war and severe humanitarian crisis that currently grips Yemen, many worry the powerful storm—expected to bring torrential rain, strong winds and severe flooding—will be much more devastating for the nation’s people than it might be otherwise. (Photo: @StationCDRKelly/NASA) Government authorities in war-torn Yemen as well as officials in neighboring Oman are urging people to evacuate coastal areas on Sunday as a very powerful—and extremely rare—cyclone readies to make landfall. Cyclone Chapala has now been categorized as the second-strongest tropical storm ever recorded in the Arabian...

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Buckle Up: Scientists Warn of Dozens of Global Warming Tipping Points That Could Trigger Natural Disasters...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Rising surface temperatures due to climate change could ultimately rearrange the planet’s ecosystems. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: sakepaint/Shutterstock.com Rising surface temperatures due to climate change could have grave consequences for human life. An international group of scientists has pinpointed 41 specific places around the globe where abrupt temperature changes could trigger natural disasters affecting ocean currents, sea ice, snow cover, tundra permafrost and terrestrial biosphere. The scientists cite environmental neglect and over-exploitation of the Earth’s resources as the main contributing factors. These “global warming tipping points” include regions that host critical elements of Earth’s planetary system, such as the Amazon forest and the Tibetan plateau. While none of the areas implicated in the study are located near any major cities, the potential impact to the planet could still be grave,...

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HURRICANE PATRICIA JUST BECAME THE STRONGEST TROPICAL CYCLONE THAT WE HAVE EVER SEEN...

Oct 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Just off the coast of Mexico swirls a storm that was just measured as the strongest tropical cyclone ever recorded. That’s right – ever in history. A few brave souls flew into the eye of the hurricane to measure its might earlier today, and they found that the massive Hurricane Patricia has winds gusting at 200 MPH – and it might not even be done growing. It’s also the most intense hurricane ever recorded in the western hemisphere, meaning that we are witnessing history right now, and Mexico is bracing for the impact. A few days ago, no one had any idea that this storm was brewing. But by Friday morning, it was clear that this was becoming a storm for the record books. It’s hard to describe how massive this storm is: besides having sustained wind...

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POPCORN, CLIMATE CHANGE, AND CRAZY WEATHER: WATCH THIS NEAT SCIENCE EXPLANATION...

Oct 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Kate Yoder   GRIST What do extreme weather events and popcorn have in common? For one, they tend to pop up more often when we turn up the heat. Climate scientist Adam Levy, better known as Climate Adam, explains the connection between climate change and extreme weather in a quirky video, where he puts on a dress and goes on a hot date … with himself. Mid-date, he embarks on an experiment, microwaving two batches of popcorn kernels on different heat settings. To no one’s surprise, more kernels pop on high heat — and the “date” doesn’t end well. “Of course, we can’t say which particular pops were caused by the extra heat and which would have popped either way,” Levy explains. “But we can say that the extra heat made popping more likely.” The...

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SOLAR-POWERED SURE HOUSE IS READY FOR THE NEXT HURRICANE SANDY...

Oct 11, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] INHABITAT by Tafline Laylin When hurricane Sandy hit the east coast of the United States in 2012, the high winds and storm surges it brought absolutely devastated many coastal homes. But next time, New York and New Jersey may be better prepared. Specifically created for coastal areas of the two states, SURE HOUSE is a solar-powered home with an open, breezy floor plan, designed to be extra resilient in the face of big storms. Although we took a sneak peak at the project while it was still in Hoboken, New Jersey, the Stevens Institute of Technology submitted their entry into this year’s Solar Decathlon competition currently underway in California, where we stopped by for a closer look. Equipped with a 9kW building integrated solar power system that can operate independently in the event...

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GODZILLA NINO AND THE BLOB: HOW WEATHER CYCLES AND OCEAN TEMPERATURES MASK GLOBAL WARMING...

Oct 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Bruce Melton, Truthout | News Analysis (Image: Lauren Walker / Truthout) With our planet’s temperature baseline ever rising, it is only a matter of time before we experience global weather patterns of outrageous proportion. The warmer it gets, the greater the risks become. Warmer temperatures add energy to earth’s environmental systems creating extremes that far outpace the temperature increase because of feedbacks. About 90 percent of heat generated from greenhouse gases is absorbed by our oceans. Because ocean currents are driven by winds, earth’s spin and unequal heating between the equator and the poles, heat is buried as warm surface water currents are obstructed and driven into the abyss. As warm water is buried, cold deep water surfaces in other areas. It is this complicated interplay of winds, currents, density, gravity...

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THE SOUTHEAST IS SET TO BE HIT BY POTENTIALLY HISTORIC RAINFALL...

Oct 3, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie ValentineCLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: NOAA via AP This satellite image taken Friday, Oct. 2, 2015 at 12:45 p.m. EDT, and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Hurricane Joaquin, bottom center, pounding the Bahamas and a deepening low pressure system on the U.S. east coast. Millions along the east coast breathed a little easier Friday after forecasters said Hurricane Joaquin would probably veer out to sea instead of joining up with a drenching rainstorm that is bringing severe flooding to parts of the Atlantic Seaboard.   Major rainfall is expected in parts of the country over the next few days, as Hurricane Joaquin moves up the East Coast. The hurricane — which is currently pummeling the Bahamas, leaving thousands without power and trapping some inside their homes — isn’t...

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CLIMATE EXPERT JAMES HANSEN: “WE’VE GOT AN EMERGENCY”...

Sep 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Anne Meador and John Zangas, DC Media Group | Report Dr. James Hansen, a grandparent himself, was the keynote speaker at Grandparents Climate Action Day, September 9, 2015, an event to mobilize elder activists and promote a policy agenda aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. (Photo: Anne Meador) The repercussions of climate disruption are still not being acknowledged fully, warned climatologist Dr. James Hansen, addressing an audience of Baby Boomer and Greatest Generation climate activists on September 9. “We’ve now got an emergency,” he told about 150 “elder activists” at Calvary Baptist Church in Washington, DC, who were participating in Grandparents Climate Action Day. Hansen – formerly NASA’s head climate scientist, now Adjunct Professor at Columbia University – is probably best known for bringing definitive evidence of global warming to Congress...

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THOUSANDS FORCED TO FLEE THEIR HOMES AFTER JAPAN EXPERIENCES ‘UNPRECEDENTED’ RAINFALL...

Sep 11, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi Electric poles tilt damaged after floods hit Joso, Ibaraki prefecture, northeast of Tokyo, Friday, Sept. 11, 2015.   Eastern Japan was hit by widespread, dangerous flooding and more than 60 landslides this week after a tropical storm brought heavy rainfall and levees holding the Kinugawa River broke. The flooding has forced more than 90,000 people to flee their homes, according to the BBC, and rescue workers have been using helicopters and boats to rescue people from the floodwaters. As of Thursday, in Osaki City, Japan, one person was missing, 21 people were injured and 1,000 homes were damaged, according to Japan’s Fire and Disaster Management Agency. Also in Osaki City, CNN reports that three people have died. In Joso, Japan — which is north...

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HURRICANE KATRINA, THE POLITICS OF DISPOSABILITY, AND THE INSENSITIVITY OF MALCOLM GLADWELL...

Sep 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TRUTHDIG   By Henry A. Giroux, CounterPunch     Malcolm Gladwell. (Surian Soosay / CC BY 2.0) This piece first appeared at CounterPunch. Katrina does more than evoke a critical understanding of institutional racism and the politics of racial disposability; it also elicits new and more dangerous justifications for racist policies. For instance, the neoliberal shill Malcolm Gladwell reaches a new low with his piece on Katrina titled Starting Over which was published in The New Yorker. He argues that for many of the 100,000 poor blacks displaced by the storm involuntary displacement was a good thing because it opened up new opportunities for upward mobility for them and provided a model for public policy. When Barbara Bush uttered a similar statement after Katrina, she was condemned roundly in the press for being...

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TEN YEARS AFTER KATRINA, WEALTHY AVARICE STILL WINS OVER THE COMMON GOOD...

Aug 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   WALTER BRASCH FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT (Photo: NASA/GSFC)This week is the 10th anniversary of the destruction of the southeastern gulf coast by Hurricane Katrina. More than 1,800 people died. There is no estimate for the number of pets and wildlife. Damage was estimated at more than $100 billion. About 80 percent of New Orleans was flooded. In Mississippi, the water surge flooded as much as 10 miles from the beaches. The Category 3 storm should not have caused that much damage, but it exposed poorly-designed levees that should have protected New Orleans. Sanctimonious critics, many of them conservative politicians, claimed that if the residents had evacuated New Orleans like they were ordered, the death toll and suffering would have been significantly less. What they didn’t say, however, was that almost all roads...

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10 YEARS AFTER KATRINA, WILL SACRAMENTO BE THE NEXT NEW ORLEANS?...

Aug 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Josh Israel CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock/Dylan Petrohilos   A 2011 New York Times Magazine story sounded the alarm: “Scientists consider Sacramento — which sits at the confluence of the Sacramento and American Rivers and near the Delta — the most flood-prone city in the nation.” The article went on to note that experts fear an earthquake or violent Pacific superstorm could destroy the city’s levees and spur a megaflood that could wreak untold damage on California’s capital region. Post-mortem studies blamed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and its flawed flood control system for the cataclysmic damage to New Orleans in August 2005. In 2006, the corps’ chief publicly owned responsibility, acknowledging that the levees that were supposed to prevent flooding were improperly built and relied on old data: “This is the...

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TYPHOON GONI BATTERS PHILLIPINES...

Aug 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Typhoon Goni Batters Philippines, At Least 10 Dead Over 5,000 people fled the oncoming typhoon. Posted: 08/22/2015 09:31 AM EDT Credit: SAM YEH/Getty Images Waves near the Wushih harbor in Yilan as typhoon Goni approaches in eastern Taiwan on Aug. 22, 2015. MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Typhoon Goni lashed the northern Philippines on Saturday with pounding rain and winds that set off landslides and flooded low-lying villages, leaving at least 10 people dead and forcing more than 5,000 to flee their homes, officials said. The typhoon’s ferocious power weakened Saturday but it still packed dangerously strong sustained winds of 150 kilometers (93 miles) per hour and gusts of up to 185 kph (115 mph) as it blew off Batanes province on the northern tip of the archipelago, the government’s weather agency said....

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HAWAII MAY SAY ‘ALOHA’ TO MORE HURRICANES...

Aug 11, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] New research suggests climate change has left the Pacific islands more susceptible to tropical storms Andrea Thompson, Climate Central  VIA SALON.COM For the second summer in a row, a tropical cyclone is headed toward Hawaii, a relative rarity for the island chain. But in a warming world, the 50th state could face more tropical storms and hurricanes, some research suggests, with one new study finding that climate change upped the odds of last year’s spate of storms. Though Hawaii is a tropical island, it doesn’t have the same risk of being hit by tropical cyclones (the generic term for tropical storms, hurricanes and typhoons) that islands in the Caribbean or Asia have. That’s because it is typically surrounded by relatively cold ocean waters and is in a region with wind patterns that tend...

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SURPRISE STORM IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA COLLAPSES BRIDGE AND SUBDUES WILDFIRE...

Jul 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE GUARDIAN Interstate 10 bridge collapse injured one driver and left hundreds stranded Heavy rains helped contain 60% of rampant wildfire amid historic drought A summer storm delivered rain, thunder and lightning to central and southern California on Saturday, leading to beach closures, flash floods and outages that left tens of thousands of people without power. Photograph: John Bender/AP Lauren Gambino in New York A rare and powerful rainstorm has drenched parched southern California, simultaneously wreaking havoc on major roadways and power lines while helping firefighters gain control of a wildfire that broke out on Friday. Heavy rains on Saturday and Sunday closed beaches and knocked out power for many southern California residents. The storm rained out a Los Angeles Angels home game for the first time in two decades. The San Diego...

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HAWAII JUST GOT HIT BY A JULY SNOW STORM (SERIOUSLY)...

Jul 19, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Because nature is crazy. Chloe Fox Editor, HuffPost Hawaii   July snowstorms are weird enough. July snowstorms in Hawaii boggle the mind. But that’s what happened at the summit of Mauna Kea on Hawaii’s Big Island on Friday morning. The combination of passing thunderstorms and near-freezing temperatures led to 1.5 inches of snow and icy conditions, according to a ranger’s report. Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano that rises 13,796 feet above sea level, gets snow regularly in the winter months, but rarely in the summer. “It can happen,” meteorologist Ryan Lyman told West Hawaii Today. “Even in July.” In the summer, average high temperatures at the summit are around 40 degrees, and average lows are around 25 degrees. Mauna Kea’s weather is extremely unpredictable, according to the Mauna Kea Weather Center. “A calm sunny day may...

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THIS CIVIL ENGINEER IS BUILDING HOUSES TO WITHSTAND EARTHQUAKES AND HURRICANES...

Jul 3, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Build Change Look who’s changing the world. By Ana Sofia Knauf GRIST Concrete might as well be part of Elizabeth Hausler Strand’s blood. Alongside her father, a masonry company owner, she spent her high school and college summer breaks in Chicago learning how to build houses. Then, in 2004, she founded Build Change, a nonprofit that retrofits and builds permanent housing in the wake of natural disasters. She was inspired to start the organization while finishing up a civil engineering masters program at the University of California Berkeley — after seeing the devastation that followed a 7.7 magnitude earthquake in Gujarat, India, which killed more than 20,000 people. “I look at housing as a basic human right — everyone has the right to a safe house that can protect them from natural disasters [including] earthquakes, typhoons, and...

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VIDEO: MASSIVE WILDFIRES FORCE THOUSANDS TO FLEE IN SASKATCHEWAN...

Jul 2, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Among the many wildfires currently roiling Alaska, Washington and other parts of North America is a series of smoke-spewing infernos that have forced around 3,000 people from their homes in several communities in the northern region of the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. Dramatic footage of one of the fires posted by a Facebook user appears above. The Weather Network reports: Premier Brad Wall told the Canadian Press on Tuesday that the number could be as high as 5,000, and the province has already burned through its entire firefighting budget for the year. Wall was forced to cancel an aerial tour of the affected areas, due to visibility issues from the dense smoke, which has combined with that of fires from Alaska and the Northwest Territories to blow down into the United States...

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WASHINGTON STATE TOWN BURNS AS “MIND BLOWING” WILDFIRES SEND HUNDREDS FLEEING...

Jun 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   HUFFINGTON POST WENATCHEE, Wash. (AP) — From just across the Wenatchee River, Dominick Bonny watched a whole neighborhood in his central Washington town burn as a wildfire destroyed two dozen homes and forced hundreds to flee. “With the wind blowing away from us, it was like we were watching a natural disaster within arm’s reach,” he said. The wildfires hit parts of central and eastern Washington over the weekend as the state is struggling with a severe drought. Mountain snowpack is at extremely low levels, and about one-fifth of the state’s rivers and streams are at record low levels. Eastern Washington has been experiencing temperatures into the 100s, and last week Washington Gov. Jay Inslee issued an emergency proclamation that allows state resources to quickly be brought in to respond to wildfires....

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STRESS ON WATER RESOURCES THREATENS LIVES AND LIVELIHOODS...

Jun 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Depletion of aquifers adds to pressures on farmers in drought-stricken areas such as California. (General Physics Laboratory via Flickr) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The planet’s great subterranean stores of water are running out—and nobody can be sure how much remains to supply billions of people in the future. Satellite instruments used to measure the flow from 37 underground aquifers between 2003 and 2013 have revealed that at least one-third of them were seriously stressed—with little or almost no natural replenishment. The research was conducted by scientists from California and the US space agency NASA, who report in the journal Water Resources Research that they used data from NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites to...

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AUSTRALIA FACES STORMY FUTURE AS TEMPERATURES SOAR...

Jun 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford, Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     A woman is trapped on the roof of her car during a flash flood in Queensland, Australia. (Kingbob86 via Wikimedia Commons) This Creative Commons-licensed piece originated with Climate News Network. LONDON—New research into storm patterns warns that flash floods are likely to sweep across the Australian landscape with increasing intensity, particularly in urban or residential areas. Peak rainfall is predicted to soar with rising surface temperatures as the world’s largest island—and also its smallest continent—experiences ever greater extremes of heat. Civil engineers from the Water Research Centre at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) report in Nature Geoscience that they looked at 40,000 storms across the whole of the continent over the last 30 years and identified a pattern that warmer temperatures...

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ALABAMA RESIDENTS AND GEOLOGISTS PERPLEXED BY SPATE OF EARTHQUAKES...

Jun 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] More than a dozen weak earthquakes have hit since last November in area more prone to tornadoes, as researchers investigate potential causes alabama earthquakes An abandoned building in Eutaw, Alabama, where a magnitude 3.8 earthquake was recorded in November about 10 miles away. Photograph: Brynn Anderson/AP Associated Press in Eutaw, Alabama   Jim Sterling didn’t know what had hit his 156-year-old antebellum home when an earthquake struck Alabama’s old plantation region early one morning last November. Startled, he grabbed a gun and ran outdoors. In the pre-dawn chill, Sterling said he found an odd scene: horses were galloping, cows mooing and dogs barking. “I heard a boom and felt the shaking,” Sterling said. “It really upset me.” More than a dozen weak earthquakes have followed in the seven months since in west Alabama’s...

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The United States just lived through its wettest month on record...

Jun 8, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] May’s extreme downpours made history Lindsay Abrams SALON.COM The United States just lived through its wettest month on record A motorist is rescued from a car trapped at a low spot near an intersection Monday, May 25, 2015 in Waco, Texas. Widespread flooding and trapped vehicles were reported throughout the area. (Rod Aydelotte/Waco Tribune Herald via AP) (Credit: AP) This past May in the United States wasn’t just really rainy — it was the country’s wettest month in 121 years of recorded history. The contiguous U.S. received 4.36 inches of rain last month, NOAA reports, a full 1.45 inches above average. With the exception of the East and West Coasts, much of the country saw highly above-average precipitation levels; Colorado, Texas and Oklahoma had their wettest Mays on record, and the latter two...

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