AS FLINT STRUGGLES WITH CONTAMINATED WATER, CONGRESS TRIES TO GUT CLEAN WATER RULE...

Jan 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) The latest attempt to do away with a federal water rule that protects millions of miles of streams failed Thursday, as senators couldn’t garner enough votes to override a presidential veto and block the contested Waters of the United States rule. The attempt to veto the rule, which protects bodies of water that provide drinking water for one-third of Americans, comes in the midst of a water contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan. The vote was deeply divided among partisan lines, with 52 senators voting to upheld the veto, eight abstaining and the remaining 40 voting against it. While the vote was close, overriding a veto requires a super-majority. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) filed for the vote, which was considered a long-shot...

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Shocker: Govt. Scientists Admit They Deceived the Public About Fracking’s Impact on Drinking Water...

Jan 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] There will be heavy pressure to revise the EPA’s conclusion — and the oil and gas industry will have major egg on its face. By Justin Gardner / The Free Thought Project  VIA ALTERNET Five years ago, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was commissioned by Congress to undertake a study on the impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on drinking water. This newer method of oil and gas extraction involves the pumping of highly pressurized water, sand and chemicals into underground rock formations. Fracking has driven the boom in U.S. oil production and contributed to the steep drop in gasoline prices, but the environmental impacts of this relatively new technique are not well understood. The EPA’s draft study—released in June to solicit input from advisers and the public—found  that fracking has already contaminated drinking...

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HERE’S NEW NEWS ABOUT PESTICIDES AND BEES...

Jan 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Nathanael Johnson Bees are struggling, and several environmental organizations want to try to help them out by banning neonicotinoid pesticides. Now the EPA has published an assessment showing that one particular neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid, hurts bees. If you know about the travails of bees, but you’re a normal person who doesn’t follow this stuff obsessively, you are probably thinking one of two things: 1. Wait, haven’t we known for years that neonics are killing bees? 2. Wait, I thought I heard that neonics weren’t the problem! Does this prove that they actually are? Each of these starting places is part right, but also part wrong — so let’s back up one step. Background First, it’s crucial to zero in on what “killing bees” means. There’s a lot of overheated rhetoric about honeybees going extinct; that’s just not happening. There’s also...

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Headaches and Nosebleeds Reported as Months-Long Methane Leak Continues in Los Angeles (VIDEO)...

Dec 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Over 1,000 families have chosen to relocate and the school district recently authorized the two local schools to move out of the area. By Hilary Lewis / Earthworks  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Lano Lan/Shutterstock Have you ever seen methane? What about benzene? Or the chemical the gas company adds to make your stovetop gas stink, mercaptan? I asked residents at a Save Porter Ranch meeting in northwest Los Angeles if they had seen the pollution they knew was in their community, pouring down from the SoCal Gas storage facility on the hill behind town. No one responded. For months now, methane pollution has been billowing from the breached facility into their community. Families have reported bad odors resulting in headaches and nosebleeds. Over 1,000 families have already chosen to relocate and the...

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Owner Of Mine That Spilled Toxic Waste Into A Colorado River Compares The EPA To Rapists...

Dec 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Nicole Gentile – Guest Contributor & Jessica Goad -CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Brennan Linsley In this Aug. 14, 2015 photo, water flows through a series of sediment retention ponds built to reduce heavy metal and chemical contaminants from the Gold King Mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about 1/4 mile downstream from the mine, outside Silverton, Colo.   Photos of the bright-orange colored Animas River in southwestern Colorado made international headlines in August after three million gallons of toxic mining sludge poured into it. Contractors working for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally released the waste while attempting to clean up the site, abandoned by its original owners decades ago. But now, three months later, the owner of the Gold King Mine told the Durango Herald that it’s he who feels “victimized”...

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AS STATE POLITICIANS RESIST OBAMA’S CLIMATE PLAN, WEST VIRGINIANS BUILD RENEWABLES ANYWAY...

Nov 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Mary Hansen, YES! Magazine | Report So far, the state isn’t stepping up to build a solar-powered future. That leaves the bulk of the work to West Virginia’s residents. (Photo: Installing solar panels via Shutterstock) West Virginia’s attorney general, Patrick Morrissey, and attorneys general from 23 other states filed a lawsuit against the Obama administration. At issue was the Clean Power Plan, which aims to cut carbon emissions from the power sector by 32 percent by 2030, in an effort to hold off climate change. The Environmental Protection Agency, responsible for enforcing the new rules, has suggested three strategies that states can combine as they see fit to achieve the cuts: make coal-fired power plants more efficient; meet new energy needs with natural gas; and develop renewable sources like wind and...

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THIS BILL MIGHT BE THE MOST CREATIVE ATTEMPT YET TO KILL THE CLEAN POWER PLAN...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Susan Walsh Re. Thomas Marino (R-PA), pictured in 2011, has introduced a bill that would change some subtle wording of the Clean Air Act, while simplifying the law’s code.   The Clean Power Plan, published in the Federal Register on Friday, is already the subject of a legal challenge by 24 states. But on Tuesday, legislators on the House Judiciary Committee will mark up a bill that could take a more roundabout way of subverting the EPA rule. H.R 2834, sponsored by Rep. Tom Marino (R-PA), is a relatively straight-forward, if somewhat odd, bill. It takes the Clean Air Act — a comprehensive environmental protection law that the EPA says is responsible for reducing pollution from six common pollutants by nearly 70 percent since 1970 —...

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OBAMA SQUANDERS OPPORTUNITY TO CLEAN UP SMOG AND FIGHT CLIMATE CHANGE...

Oct 2, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Reuters / Mike Blake By Ben Adler   GRIST Like liberals who are struggling to accept that Pope Francis met with America’s most anti-gay county clerk last week, environmentalists are feeling betrayed by President Obama. On Thursday, the Environmental Protection Agency released a new regulation for ground-level ozone, a primary ingredient in smog — and it’s much weaker than green groups wanted. The Obama administration has a long and tortured history with the smog rule; the EPA moved to strengthen it in 2011 but was overruled by the White House. Now the administration has finally imposed a new rule, only it’s too lax and four years too late. EPA is lowering the definition of a safe level for ozone from below 75 parts per billion to 70 ppb. That’s still well above what the...

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DESPITE ALL-CLEAR FROM EPA, NEW STUDIES SHOW LINGERING CONTAMINATION AFTER ANIMAS RIVER SPILL...

Sep 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Natasha Geiling CREDIT: AP Photo/Brennan Linsley Water flows down Cement Creek just below the site of the blowout at the Gold King mine which triggered a major spill of toxic wastewater, outside Silverton, Colo., Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015.   On September 2, the EPA released data showing that water and sediment samples taken from the San Juan River — whose largest tributary, the Animas River, was tainted with three million gallons of toxic wastewater from the Gold King Mine spill earlier this summer — had returned to pre-spill levels. On September 16, during a hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, EPA administrator Gina McCarthy reiterated those findings. But a spate of recently released studies paint a less positive picture of the river’s return to health. According to Al...

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HOUSE VOTES TO KEEP EPA FROM CONSIDERING COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE...

Sep 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty The House passed a bill Friday that prohibits agencies from considering the social cost of carbon in permit applications. Climate change costs an incredible amount of money. Whether it is deaths during heat waves, reconstruction after a superstorm, or even lost revenues at ski slopes, rising temperatures and increased extreme weather events are costing the economy. In fact, Citibank reported earlier this year that it will cost $44 trillion worldwide by 2060 to mitigate the costs of climate change under the business as usual scenario. But efforts to include those costs in permitting projects just took another hit, when the House voted to pass the RAPID Act, a bill intended to streamline permitting processes. Tucked into the bill is language that will prohibit...

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THE BEES HAVE THEIR DAY IN COURT — AND WIN BIG...

Sep 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   A federal appeals court overturns the government’s approval of a powerful new pesticide linked to pollinator deaths. (Photo: Derek Davis/Getty Images) Sep 11, 2015Taylor Hill is an associate editor at TakePart covering environment and wildlife.   A federal court has overturned the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s approval of sulfoxaflor, a pesticide linked to the mass die-off of honeybees that pollinate a third of the world’s food supply. The three-judge panel said the EPA green-lit sulfoxaflor even though initial studies showed the product was highly toxic to pollinators such as bees. The chemical compound belongs to a class of insecticides, known as neonicotinoids, that scientific studies have implicated in bee deaths.   “Because the EPA’s decision to unconditionally register sulfoxaflor was based on flawed and limited data, we conclude that the unconditional...

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IS SECRET POWER BECOMING SACROSANCT IN THE U.S.?...

Aug 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Evaggelos Vallianatos, Speakout | Op-Ed I have lived in the United States for fifty-four years. I went to college where I learned the basics of science and history. I am grateful the University of Illinois and the University of Wisconsin gave me an excellent and free education. Harvard did the same thing with my postdoctoral studies in the history of science. A federal fellowship made that possible. I brought a passion for truth everywhere I worked, which was mostly on Capitol Hill and the US Environmental Protection Agency. I also taught at several universities. My work brought me face to face with a secret version of the US, not the country I thought about during my university studies. Secrets had something todo with this. I knew, of course, that individuals and...

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HOW THE EPA AND NEW YORK TIMES ARE GETTING METHANE ALL WRONG...

Aug 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Pretty much every recent news article you’ve read about the global warming impact of methane compared to carbon dioxide is wrong. Embarrassingly, everyone from the Environmental Protection Agency itself to the New York Times and Washington Post and Wall Street Journal continue to use lowball numbers that are wrong and outdated. In fact, as we’ll see, they are doubly outdated. Here, for instance, is the New York Times from Tuesday: “Methane, which leaks from oil and gas wells, accounts for just 9 percent of the nation’s greenhouse gas pollution — but it is over 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide, so even small amounts of it can have a big impact on global warming.” Here is the EPA’s own news release from Tuesday on...

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GREED DIES HARD IN A POISONED LAND...

Aug 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Emersen Sud crouches along a bank of the Animas River, in Durango, Colorado, August 14, 2015. A recent accident that leaked a toxic yellow plume of sludge from the Gold King mine into the Animas River heightened a debate over the future of this region’s old mines. (Photo: Mark Holm/The New York Times) When Arizona Sen. John McCain met with the Navajo Nation’s tribal government on Saturday at their capital in Window Rock, Arizona, after arriving in a big black SUV, he believed he would be spending the day observing the commemoration of Code Talkers Day. This was not the case. A group of Navajo activists, incensed at the damage done to the Animas River by a toxic chemical spill from an abandoned mine, confronted the senator. Rather than address their concerns, McCain scuttled...

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EPA’s Colorado Mine Spill: What You Need to Know...

Aug 13, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The agency spilled 3 million gallons of toxic wastewater into a Colorado river. Here’s the latest. By Clara Chaisson / OnEarth Magazine  VIA ALTERNET August 12, 2015 Photo Credit: EPA Right now Colorado’s Animas River looks more like an ad for Tang than the scenic blue ribbon it usually is. Last Wednesday the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally released three million gallons of heavy-metal-laden mining waste, and the toxic surge is making its way downriver. Here’s the latest on what’s going on. Wait, the EPA did that? Yes. The agency is typically in the business of cleaning upthis kind of mess, but in this case, well, it screwed up — big time. While supervising the drainage of the Gold King Mine near Silverton, Colorado (one of many abandoned mines in the area) workers breached an...

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“Catastrophe!” Screamed the Newspaper Headline...

Aug 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] via DAILY KOS by Thinking FellaFollow for Four Corners Kossacks At approximately 10:30am on Wednesday, August 5th, 2015, the wheels were set in motion for a man-made disaster in the Animas River watershed near Durango, Colorado. Truth be told–those wheels have been grinding slowly for decades, but on the date & time above the dam finally broke. Literally. Our river now looks like this: Photo courtesy of The La Plata County Emergency Management Office Follow me over the pile of toxic Heavy Metals for a sad tale of greed, corruption, delays, misguided civic boosters, the EPA, and my town’s beloved & now destroyed river. I suppose this story begins over a century ago, in the rugged & beautiful southern Rocky Mountains. The San Juan Mountains, beautiful as they are, held a thing even...

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ABANDONED MINE LEAKS MILLIONS OF GALLONS OF BRIGHT ORANGE, TOXIC WATER INTO COLORADO RIVER...

Aug 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: EPA A mine blew out last week, leaking three million gallons of bright orange water into a Colorado river.   Three million gallons of bright orange wastewater has spilled from an abandoned mine in Colorado, after Environmental Protection Agency efforts to contain the mine’s toxic water went awry last week. According to the EPA’s onsite coordinator, a team was working to “investigate and address contamination” at a nearby mine when they unexpectedly triggered the spill from the Gold King Mine, which is still pumping 500 gallons of contaminated water per minute into the Animas River, near Silverton, Colorado. The EPA has been trying for years to get some areas around Silverton declared a Superfund site — a designation which would direct federal funds toward cleanup — but...

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IS THE LOS ANGELES WATER SUPPLY BEING POISONED?...

Jul 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment California has investigated more than 2,000 injection wells for possible risks to public safety, clean water and natural resources, but Governor Brown hasn’t released the findings. Center for Biological Diversity Photo Credit: Anan Kaewkhammul/Shutterstock.com On Thursday, the Center for Biological Diversity urged California officials to release results from an investigation into thousands of oil industry injection wells in the Los Angeles area that may be contaminating water and threatening public health. “State oil officials need to come clean about this dirty threat to L.A.’s water supplies,” said Hollin Kretzmann, a Center attorney. “Gov. Brown’s administration has already admitted allowing other oil wells to dump waste into clean water. But this new investigation suggests an even wider oil pollution risk during the worst drought in state history. It makes no sense to sit...

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HERE’S A NEW IDEA FOR GIVING EPA MORE POWER TO REGULATE CO2...

Jul 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock Look to the seas By Ben Adler GRIST Reading about ocean acidification is usually a bummer: A hefty portion of the carbon dioxide we’re spewing into the atmosphere is getting absorbed into the oceans, where it is killing off sea creatures (including some of the most delicious ones) and ruining coastal economies. Each report on the topic seems more dire than the last. Just last week, a team of experts found, in BBC’s phrasing, that “CO2 from burning fossil fuels is changing the chemistry of the seas faster than at any time since a cataclysmic natural event known as the Great Dying 250 million years ago.” Awesome. But what if ocean acidification could also offer a new way to compel the U.S. government to get serious about regulating carbon emissions? That’s the...

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OBAMA’S CLIMATE WILL SURVIVE EVEN IF A REPUBLICAN IS ELECTED, SAYS EPA CHIEF...

Jul 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE GUARDIAN Head of Environmental Protection Agency says carbon pollution rules that are main pillar of plan will also go ahead despite recent supreme court ruling Gina McCarthy EPA The EPA administrator, Gina McCarthy, at a panel discussion on energy and environment cooperation in Washington last month. Photograph: Alex Wong/Getty Images Suzanne Goldenberg US environment correspondent     Barack Obama’s main weapon in fighting climate change will survive even if Republicans win the White House in 2016, a key member of his administration said on Tuesday. Gina McCarthy, who heads the Environmental Protection Agency, said the carbon pollution rules that are the main pillar of Obama’s climate plan would go ahead as planned despite a “disappointing” supreme court ruling last week against another EPA rule for mercury and other toxins, and attacks on...

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NEW LAWSUIT SAYS CLEAN WATER RULE THREATENS “THE VERY STRUCTURE OF THE CONSTITUTION”...

Jun 30, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: CLIMATE PROGRESS Sixteen states filed lawsuits Monday aimed at blocking the Obama administration’s Waters of the United States rule, which seeks to clarify the bodies of water that the EPA can regulate under the Clean Water Act. Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi filed a joint lawsuit in a Houston federal court, asserting that the EPA’s final rule is “an unconstitutional and impermissible expansion of federal power over the states and their citizens and property owners.” While the EPA has the authority to regulate water quality, the suit says Congress has not granted the EPA the power to regulate water and land use. The lawsuit claims that “the very structure of the Constitution, and therefore liberty itself, is threatened when administrative agencies attempt to assert independent sovereignty and lawmaking...

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ENVIRONMENTALISTS REMAIN HOPEFUL AFTER SUPREME COURT EMISSIONS RULING...

Jun 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Kate Sheppard HUFFINGTON POST WASHINGTON — While the Supreme Court’s Monday ruling on mercury standards was a setback for the Obama administration’s drive to regulate emissions from power plants, it’s not necessarily a death blow for the rules. Environmental advocates say they have two reasons to be hopeful: The lower court could still allow the rules for mercury and air toxics to go forward while the Environmental Protection Agency readjusts them in response to the Supreme Court’s decision, and the decision doesn’t necessarily have negative implications for the rest of the administration’s sweeping power plant standards. “We could have gotten hosed, and we didn’t,” said John Walke, a senior attorney at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “This decision was just about as narrow as it could be.” The Supreme Court’s decision found that...

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SUPREME COURT REJECTS EPA’S REGULATION OF POWER PLANTS’ EMISSIONS OF MERCURY AND OTHER TOXINS...

Jun 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Meteor Blades   DAILY KOS The U.S. Supreme Court plunked a setback into the lap of the Environmental Protection Agency Monday by trashing the agency’s regulation of emissions of mercury and other air toxins (MATS) from electricity-generating plants. The court overturned a lower-court decision in the case of Michigan v. EPA stating that the agency had acted reasonably when it chose not to considering costs first in its effort to control those emissions. The justices split 5-4, with the four liberals on the side of the EPA and the four conservatives and Justice Anthony Kennedy on the side of industry and the states that had sued.The ruling—Michigan v. Environmental Protection Agency and two other consolidated cases—is a major disappointment for environmentalists and drag on the Obama administration’s efforts to reduce toxic emissions. While...

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EPA: LIMITING CLIMATE CHANGE WOULD HAVE TREMENDOUS BENEFITS FOR THE U.S....

Jun 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: shutterstock   Acting on climate change will have major economic, environmental, and health benefits, according to a report released Monday by the Environmental Protection Agency. The report analyzes two future climate change scenarios — one in which “significant global action” on climate change has limited warming to 2°C (3.6°F), and one in which no action on climate change has forced global temperatures to rise 9°F. The report documents the multiple benefits that the U.S would feel if major action is taken on climate change. These benefits include a reduction of the frequency of extreme weather events and a lowered risk of extreme temperatures. According to the report, if the world limits warming to 2°C, 49 U.S. cities could avoid 12,000 deaths associated with extreme temperatures every...

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New Report Shows EPA’S Proposed Carbon Regulations Will Create Tens Of Thousands Of Jobs...

Jun 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jeff Gentner   By 2020, the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed Clean Power Plan will create nearly 100,000 more jobs than are lost, according to a new report from the Economic Policy Institute, a non-partisan think tank. The report’s initial estimates are higher than some similar studies; however, the institute found that the job impacts of the Clean Power Plan, which limits carbon emissions from power plants, would not last, and would become “almost completely insignificant by 2030.” Coal mining and coal-fired power plants will face the biggest job losses if the Clean Power Plan is implemented, because coal-fired power plants are responsible for 39 percent of the United States’ electricity generation and three-quarters of the sector’s carbon emissions. But other sectors, including renewable energy,...

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BREAKING: Court Throws Out Challenge To Obama’s Climate Change Rule...

Jun 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: shutterstock   The Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia threw out a lawsuit that challenged the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Clean Power Plan Tuesday, saying that because the rule isn’t yet in its final stage, it’s too soon for court challenges. “They want us to do something that they candidly acknowledge we have never done before: review the legality of a proposed rule,” Judge Brett Kavanaugh wrote in the opinion. “But a proposed rule is just a proposal. In justiciable cases, this Court has authority to review the legality of final agency rules. We do not have authority to review proposed agency rules.” This ruling wasn’t unexpected. When the court heard the case in April, the three presiding judges made it clear that they were...

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Streams and Rivers Left Vulnerable to Pollution Under New “Clean Water Rule”...

Jun 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] WATERKEEPER ALLIANCE The new Clean Water Rule, issued by the US EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers, reduces the agencies’ jurisdiction to protect waters that have previously been covered by the Clean Water Act since the 1970s. The rule redefines what exactly constitutes the Waters of the US, exempting streams and rivers and allowing these waters to be filled with toxic coal ash and other waste. The rule also grants immunity to industrial-scale livestock facilities and includes an exclusion that allows industries to escape treatment requirements by impounding waters of the United States and claiming the impoundment is a waste treatment system, or by discharging wastes into wetlands. “From the smallest tributary, to the mightiest river, to our lakes, bays and ocean, clean water connects us to many valuable resources. Maintaining legal...

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Opponents Of Obama’s Carbon Pollution Rule Are Trying Nearly Everything To Take It Down...

Jun 8, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   by Ryan Koronowski CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock When the Obama administration unveiled its plan to make the most significant move ever to tackle the carbon pollution that causes climate change, it expected opponents to throw everything they had, even the kitchen sink, against it. So it can be hard to keep track of all the tactics that critics in Congress, the states, and industry have been using to keep the administration from regulating carbon dioxide from power plants. Some are redundant, some are doomed to fail, and some have a chance of stopping or fatally delaying the rule. But first, it’s important to keep in mind what the carbon rule actually is. The proposed rule, part of the Clean Power Plan, provides states with the flexibility to craft their own plans to...

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Congressional Republicans are outraged that the EPA wants to protect our drinking water...

May 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] “The only people with reason to oppose the rule are polluters who knowingly threaten our clean water” Lindsay Abrams  SALON.COM (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File) (Credit: AP) The EPA knew it was stepping onto a battlefield Wednesday when it released its final version of a rule aimed at protecting America’s stream and wetlands, clearing up confusion inherent in the original Clean Water Act and allowing regulators to stop pollution from spreading to the larger waterways on which one in three Americans rely for drinking water. And the agency was ready for the critics. “The only people with reason to oppose the rule,” White House Senior Advisor Brian Deese told reporters on a press call Wednesday, “are polluters who knowingly threaten our clean water.” So who are those willful polluters? Congressional Republicans, along with a...

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New EPA Rule Reduces Pollution In Communities Located Near Power Plants...

May 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine   CLIMATE PROGRESS   CREDIT: shutterstock The Environmental Protection Agency finalized a new rule on power plants and other industrial facilities Friday that advocates say will drastically improve the quality of life of people living near industrial zones. The EPA’s new “Startup, Shutdown, and Malfunction” rule targets just what it sounds like: the emissions produced when power plants start up, shut down, or malfunction. Until now, a loophole in EPA regulations meant that power plants could unleash unlimited pollution during these times, meaning that the communities that live near power plants — which, according to the Sierra Club, are often lower-income and communities of color — were subject to emissions that could be 10 times the level typically allowed to be released by power plants. Now, under the new rule, states...

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