Commentary: Update of Toxic Substances Control Act a worthy step that’s long overdue...

Jul 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., center, joined by, from left, Sen. Edward J. Markey, D-Mass., Sen. David Vitter, R-La., Bonnie Lautenberg, widow of the late New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg, Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., and Sen. Shelley Moore Capito R-W. Va., talks about bipartisan legislation to improve the federal regulation of chemicals and toxic substances, Thursday, May 19, 2016. J. Scott Applewhite/AP In a groundbreaking report six years ago, a National Cancer Institute panel warned that it was time to pay closer attention to environmental causes of a disease that takes more than a half-million American lives each year. “[T]he true burden of environmentally induced cancer has been grossly underestimated,” the panelists wrote in their transmittal letter to President Obama in April 2010. “With nearly 80,000 chemicals on the market in the United States,...

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A THIRD OF CALIFORNIA’S DEEP GROUNDWATER AQUIFIERS ARE BEING USED FOR OIL AND GAS...

Jul 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/John Locher Water is pumped from a well into an irrigation ditch near Fresno, Calif.   California has a lot more usable groundwater than previously thought — but that water might already be in danger from oil and gas extraction in the state. A study released this week by Stanford scientists shows that there is nearly three times more groundwater in California’s Central Valley than earlier surveys had indicated. “It’s not often that you find a ‘water windfall,’ but we just did,” study co-author Robert Jackson, the Michelle and Kevin Douglas Provostial Professor at Stanford, said in the study’s release. “There’s far more fresh water and usable water than we expected.” Jackson and his research partner looked at deep groundwater aquifers, between 1,000 and 3,000...

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WHY THE ENVIRONMENTAL WORKING GROUP ISN’T BACKING THE TOXIC CHEMICALS COMPROMISE...

Jun 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Health & Science Most chemicals used in everything from cleaners to candy bars have never been reviewed by either the EPA or the FDA. This measure won’t change that. By Scott Faber MOYERS & CO There are surprisingly few regulations on the use of chemicals in the USA (Photo: Daderot, via Wikimedia Commons) (Editor’s Note: Several weeks ago, a rare thing happened in Washington: Members of the House and Senate, Democrats and Republicans, announced a bipartisan compromise on a long-awaited bill to modernize the nation’s regulation of toxic chemicals. It won the support across the ideological gamut, from the American Chemistry Council to the White House. The legislation passed the House last month on a lopsided 408-12 vote and the Senate followed suit Tuesday evening, approving the measure on a voice vote. So what’s...

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FEDS FINALLY ADDRESS THE RISKS OF WIDELY USED AG CHEMICAL – ATRAZINE...

Jun 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   A new government report on the weed killer atrazine highlights risks to wildlife that researchers have been pointing to for years. (Photo: David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters) Willy Blackmore is TakePart’s Food editor.   A 500-some-page draft assessment on an agricultural chemical from a federal agency is generally not the stuff of intrigue and redemption. But just such a document could upend the American corn industry, generate strict new regulations for a chemical company in the midst of being acquired by a Chinese firm for $43 billion, and clear the name of a researcher who nearly had his reputation destroyed. The document published Thursday by the Environmental Protection Agency reads, “This risk assessment concludes that aquatic plant communities are impacted in many areas where atrazine use is heaviest, and there is potential chronic risk to...

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33 OTHER U.S. CITIES HAVE CHEATED WATER TESTS THAT DETECT LEAD...

Jun 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Guardian tried to obtain “water testing documents” from 81 cities and 43 offered information. The tricks used by officials include practices such as removing aerators, pre-flushing pipes, and running water slowly. All these practices potentially reduce the amount of lead that shows up in water samples. Sometimes officials didn’t test water in what they determined were “high-risk homes.” Related: BREAKING: What Flint officials knew about the poisoned water, and when In Michigan and New Hampshire, departments allowed employees to re-sample and toss out “results with high lead levels.” In Chicago and Philadelphia, officials requested that employees “test water safety in their own homes.” Some cities, citing security risk concerns, said they didn’t know where lead pipes were or didn’t conduct testing in the mandatory amount of homes with lead pipes. As a...

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COMMENTARY: UPDATE OF TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT A WORTHY STEP THAT’S LONG OVERDUE...

May 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] J. Scott Applewhite/AP In a groundbreaking report six years ago, a National Cancer Institute panel warned that it was time to pay closer attention to environmental causes of a disease that takes more than a half-million American lives each year. “[T]he true burden of environmentally induced cancer has been grossly underestimated,” the panelists wrote in their transmittal letter to President Obama in April 2010. “With nearly 80,000 chemicals on the market in the United States, many of which are used by millions of Americans in their daily lives and are un- or understudied and largely unregulated, exposure to potential environmental carcinogens is widespread.” The report’s authors said the federal law aimed at controlling such hazards, the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976, “may be the most egregious example of ineffective regulation of environmental...

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HOUSE PASSES ZIKA BILL THAT WON’T FIGHT THE VIRUS BUT MAY PUT MORE PESTICIDES IN YOUR WATER...

May 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Despite the fact that Congress has yet to pass a fully-funded Zika emergency bill, the House of Representatives passed the Zika Vector Control Act Tuesday evening, a bill ostensibly aimed at helping to fight the potential spread of the Zika virus throughout the United States. But House Democrats and environmental organizations are crying foul, arguing that the bill uses the threat of Zika as a cover for rolling back crucial EPA regulations that protect bodies of water from pesticides. “The reality is that the majority has been pushing this legislation for years under whatever name is convenient at the time,” Rep. Raul Ruiz (D-CA) said during the floor debate Tuesday. “This bill has nothing to do with combating Zika.” Opponents of the bill noted that...

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LONG BEACH FILES LAWSUIT AGAINST MONSANTO...

May 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TRUTHDIG posted by emma niles   The Port of Long Beach. (via Flickr) Following the lead of six other West Coast cities, the city of Long Beach on Thursday filed paperwork to sue Monsanto, alleging that the agrochemical giant is responsible for chemical contamination of its water sources, including the Port of Long Beach. The Long Beach Post reports: According to the complaint, PCBs find their way to Long Beach waters when they leach, leak, off-gas and escape their intended applications, causing runoff during naturally occurring storm and rain events, after being released into the environment. … The city said it continues to “incur significant costs related to PCBs in its storm water and the sedimentary deposits in the Port of Long Beach and adjacent ocean floor areas,” according to a release. In...

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3 PESTICIDES ARE PUTTING NEARLY ALL U.S. ENDANGERED SPECIES AT RISK...

May 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File   A few widely-used pesticides have the ability to harm nearly all the endangered species in America, a new report from the Environmental Protection Agency has found. The EPA’s draft report, which was released earlier this month, looked at three widely-used pesticides: chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and malathion. It found that both malathion, which is used in agriculture, for lawn care, and for mosquito control, and chlorpyrifos, which is used on a range of crops including cotton, almonds, and fruit trees, was “likely to adversely affect” 97 percent of the 1,782 species listed under the Endangered Species Act. The other pesticide, diazinon, which is used in orchards and vegetable crops, was found to likely adversely affect 79 percent of these species. Federal agencies like...

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U.S. CAN MEET PARIS CLIMATE GOALS (WITH OR WITHOUT THE SUPREME COURT)...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] People power. Photographer: FRANCOIS GUILLOT/AFP/Getty Images     Michael R. Bloomberg As world leaders gather in New York on Friday to sign the Paris Agreement on climate change, some have expressed concern that as they implement their commitments, the U.S. Supreme Court has put on hold the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan. Their concern is understandable, but it’s important to recognize: The federal government is not the primary force in the U.S. fight against climate change, and even if the court ultimately strikes down certain parts of the plan, the U.S. will meet and probably exceed its commitment to reduce emissions by 26 to 28 percent by 2025. Here’s why. It was a modest goal. By 2015, the U.S. had already cut emissions by 11 percent compared with 2005 levels. So our starting line was nearly...

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HOW A PAPER PLANT IN ARKANSAS IS ALLEGEDLY POISONING THE PEOPLE OF CROSSETT...

Apr 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Tech & Science By Emily Crane Linn NEWSWEEK The Georgia-Pacific’s aeration pond in Crossett, Arkansas. The paper and plywood plant employs a large amount of the surrounding community and many in the area blame the plant’s pollution for the severe health issues residents are facing. Nicolaus Czarnecki/ZUMA/Alamy “Let me give you a sketch of the neighborhood,” Leroy Patton said as he put his car in Park on the side of Lawson Road. He took his toothpick out of his mouth and used it to point to an empty house, an abandoned doll lying facedown in the weeds in front of the hollow structure. The Lawson couple used to live here, Patton says; the street was named for them. “They’re dead from cancer and stroke.” He pointed to another property. “Down here is Pat....

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Why Is the USDA Silencing Its Own Scientists’ Warnings About the Dangerous Effects of Pesticides?...

Apr 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Government whistleblowers are our first line of defense against unscrupulous companies and purchased politicians responsible for the poisoning of honeybees. By Evaggelos Vallianatos / AlterNet bee keeper with bee colony Photo Credit: Pazargic Liviu/Shutterstock [Editor’s note: Evidence has been mounting that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been silencing its own bee scientists who have raised the alarm about the deadly impact that pesticides, particularly neonicotinoids, have on bees. Last month, for example, the Washington Post reported the story of Jonathan Lindgren, a USDA bee scientist, who filed a whistleblower suit alleging that he was disciplined to suppress his research. In 2014, Dr. Jeffery Pettis, another USDA bee scientist and beekeeping advocate, was demoted, leading several beekeeping and environmental organizations to express concern that the agency has actively suppressed bee science that...

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U.S. WATER SYSTEMS REPEATEDLY EXCEED FEDERAL STANDARD FOR LEAD...

Apr 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By RYAN J. FOLEY and MEGHAN HOYER   A.P. In this Wednesday, March 9, 2016 photo, city officials display an example of the lead pipes in… Read more GALESBURG, Ill. (AP) — This railroad town promotes its ties to Abraham Lincoln, Ronald Reagan and the poet Carl Sandburg. But Galesburg’s long history also shows in a hidden way: Aging pipes have been leaking lead into the drinking water for decades. Blood tests show cause for concern. One in 20 children under the age of 6 in Knox County had lead levels exceeding the state standard for public health intervention, a rate six times higher than the Illinois average, in 2014. Galesburg offers just one example of how the problem of lead-tainted drinking water goes far beyond Flint, Michigan, the former auto manufacturing center...

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THE FUTURE FOR FLINT’S CHILDREN...

Mar 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By MONA HANNA-ATTISHA   NYTIMES Credit Arianna Vairo Flint, Mich. — THE World Health Organization’s “action level” for lead contamination in drinking water — indicating the need for intervention — is 10 parts per billion. The Environmental Protection Agency’s action level is 15 parts per billion. In tests of tap water in Flint., Mich., over the last six months, some 1,300 homes exceeded the E.P.A. action level. Thirty-two had levels above 1,000 parts per billion. And just this month, a sample showed a concentration as high as 11,846 parts per billion. To understand the contamination of this city, think about drinking water through a straw coated in lead. As you sip, lead particles flake off into the water and are ingested. For almost two years, Flint’s children have been drinking water through lead-coated straws....

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GLOBAL WARMING’S TERRIFYING NEW CHEMISTRY...

Mar 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Our leaders thought fracking would save our climate. They were wrong. Very wrong. By Bill McKibben / The Nation  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Calin Tatu/Shutterstock Global warming is, in the end, not about the noisy political battles here on the planet’s surface. It actually happens in constant, silent interactions in the atmosphere, where the molecular structure of certain gases traps heat that would otherwise radiate back out to space. If you get the chemistry wrong, it doesn’t matter how many landmark climate agreements you sign or how many speeches you give. And it appears the United States may have gotten the chemistry wrong. Really wrong. There’s one greenhouse gas everyone knows about: carbon dioxide, which is what you get when you burn fossil fuels. We talk about a “price on carbon” or argue...

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Chemical Companies Decide What’s Toxic, Not the EPA or FDA...

Mar 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] A bill on drinking water standards was being vetted—and possibly even written, at least in part—by chemical industry lobbyists. By Wendell Potter, Nick Penniman / Bloomsbury Press   VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: KANIN.studio / Shutterstock.com The following is an excerpt from the new book Nation on the Take by Wendell Potter & Nick Penniman (Bloomsbury Press, 2016): Arsenic, like formaldehyde, can cause health and developmental problems and at high levels is linked to certain cancers. Columbia University professor Joseph Graziano jokes, darkly, that arsenic makes lead look like a vitamin. That’s because, as he told the Center for Public Integrity’s David Heath, it “sweeps across the body and impact[s] everything that’s going on, every organ system.” It’s in weed killers marketed to fight your lawn’s crabgrass, and, in many places, it’s in the water we drink. A 2008...

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ALL EYES ON FLINT, BUT DRINKING WATER CRISIS STRETCHES NATIONWIDE...

Mar 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] 6 By Deirdre Fulton / Common Dreams   VIA TRUTHDIG     The Flint Water Plant tower in Michigan. (ehrlif / Shutterstock) While a congressional hearing Thursday focused attention on the drinking water crisis in Flint, Michigan, news reporting from around the country reveals that the problem of lead-contamination afflicts communities nationwide. A multi-part USA Today investigation published this week identified almost 2,000 additional water systems in all 50 states where testing has shown excessive levels of lead contamination over the past four years. “The water systems, which reported lead levels exceeding Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] standards, collectively supply water to 6 million people,” according to reporters Alison Young and Mark Nichols. The series installment released Thursday details hundreds of educational facilities across the nation “where children were exposed to water containing excessive amounts...

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MERRICK GARLAND KNOWS HE’S NOT A SCIENTIST...

Mar 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Andrew Harnik Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland shakes hands with President Barack Obama as he is introduced as Obama’s nominee for the Supreme Court during an announcement in the Rose Garden of the White House, in Washington, Wednesday, March 16, 2016.   How do you judge a judge? In the case of Judge Merrick Garland, who President Obama nominated for the Supreme Court on Wednesday, there is not much evidence for or against his environmental record. But as cases against the EPA’s Clean Power Plan and other regulatory actions head to the courts, it’s important to glean what we can. By and large, Garland has a reputation for allowing agencies to do the work they set out to do — and that’s usually a...

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CUTTING CARBON EMISSIONS COULD SAVE LIVES SOONER THAN YOU MAY THINK...

Mar 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] It could save up to 175,000 people in the U.S. — and $250 billion — by 2030. Casey Williams Editorial Fellow, The Huffington Post zhuyongming via Getty Images Pollution from a power plant. A new study shows cutting carbon emissions could prevent thousands of deaths in the U.S. by 2030. Slashing carbon emissions won’t just ease global warming. It could also save thousands of lives in the U.S. by drastically reducing deaths caused by air pollution. The cuts in carbon emissions needed to limit the rise of global temperatures to 2 degrees Celsius (or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) would significantly reduce other kinds of air pollution, according to a new study by researchers at Duke University and the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The study, published Monday in Nature Climate Change, showed that these cuts in pollution...

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BREAKING: THE EPA WILL LIMIT METHANE FROM EXISTING OIL AND GAS FACILITIES...

Mar 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Susan Walsh President Barack Obama, right, and Canada’’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, stand to shake hands following their bilateral meeting at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Manila, Philippines, in November. The two leaders announced major climate actions Thursday in advance of the Canadian leader’s first U.S. state dinner.   The EPA will limit methane emissions from existing oil and gas facilities — a huge move by the federal agency, announced in conjunction with President Obama’s meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Thursday. The new rule will help the two countries achieve their goal of cutting methane emissions from oil and gas by 40 to 45 percent below 2012 levels by 2025. “The two leaders regard the Paris Agreement as a turning point in global efforts...

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HERE’S HOW THE EPA CAN ACHIEVE PARIS CLIMATE GOALS — WITHOUT INVOLVING CONGRESS...

Mar 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] An unused provision of the Clean Air Act authorizes the EPA to develop and implement an economy-wide, market-based program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. By Michael Burger / Sabin Center for Climate Change Law Photo Credit: Bart Everett/Shutterstock A team of law professors and attorneys at three of the country’s leading centers devoted to climate change and environmental law have published a joint paper concluding that an unused provision of the Clean Air Act authorizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop and implement an economy-wide, market-based program to reduce domestic greenhouse gas emissions and achieve the Obama Administration’s Paris Agreement pledge. The program could be implemented without further Congressional action and would provide regulators and businesses seeking to mitigate climate change with clear benefits – increased flexibility, heightened administrative and economic efficiency,...

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AN ATTEMPT TO LET COAL PLANTS EMIT UNLIMITED MERCURY WAS JUST SHUT DOWN BY SCOTUS...

Mar 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Emily AtkinCLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Regulations that limit heavy metal pollution from oil- and coal-fired power plants will continue to be enforced by the EPA — at least for now — thanks to Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. On Thursday, Roberts unilaterally rejected a petition from 20 conservative-led states asking the court to temporarily halt the regulations. Halting the regulations would effectively allow power plants to emit unlimited mercury, arsenic, chromium, and other toxic heavy metals into the environment. Led by Michigan, the states had asked the Supreme Court to stay the Mercury Air Toxics Standard — commonly referred to as MATS — while the D.C. Circuit court considers its legality. Last summer, the Supreme Court found that the EPA had not properly considered how much the rule would cost...

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CALIFORNIA MOVES FORWARD WITH DRILLING IN PROTECTED AQUIFIERS...

Feb 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File California has both water and oil underground. Which is worth more?   A California regulator is asking the EPA to officially allow oil drilling and wastewater disposal in a protected aquifer near San Luis Obispo. The request is the first of dozens the state is expected to make, after revelations surfaced that the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources had, for years, improperly issued permits to inject wastewater into underground basins protected by the Clean Water Act. The California Water Board has signed off on its sister agency’s request, saying that the aquifer is separated from local drinking water sources by an “impermeable barrier.” But residents and environmentalists are skeptical. Californians have good reason to be skeptical that the division, known...

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MEAT IS MURDERING AMERICAN RIVERS...

Feb 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Government data shows that food processing plants are the biggest toxic polluters of waterways in the U.S. Workers process turkeys at the West Liberty Foods processing plant in West Liberty, Iowa. (Photo: Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters)   There is no question that industrial agriculture is polluting the nation’s waterways, but huge factory farms are not the only culprits: Food processing plants also dump millions of pounds of toxic waste into rivers, lakes, and streams, according to an analysis released by Environment America, a national coalition of advocacy groups. The report listed the top 15 water polluters in terms of volume but focused mostly on Tyson Foods, which processes 73 million pounds of beef, pork, and poultry every week. “Tyson Foods Inc. and its subsidiaries dumped 104 million pounds of pollutants into waterways...

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AS FLINT STRUGGLES WITH CONTAMINATED WATER, CONGRESS TRIES TO GUT CLEAN WATER RULE...

Jan 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) The latest attempt to do away with a federal water rule that protects millions of miles of streams failed Thursday, as senators couldn’t garner enough votes to override a presidential veto and block the contested Waters of the United States rule. The attempt to veto the rule, which protects bodies of water that provide drinking water for one-third of Americans, comes in the midst of a water contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan. The vote was deeply divided among partisan lines, with 52 senators voting to upheld the veto, eight abstaining and the remaining 40 voting against it. While the vote was close, overriding a veto requires a super-majority. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) filed for the vote, which was considered a long-shot...

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Shocker: Govt. Scientists Admit They Deceived the Public About Fracking’s Impact on Drinking Water...

Jan 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] There will be heavy pressure to revise the EPA’s conclusion — and the oil and gas industry will have major egg on its face. By Justin Gardner / The Free Thought Project  VIA ALTERNET Five years ago, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was commissioned by Congress to undertake a study on the impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on drinking water. This newer method of oil and gas extraction involves the pumping of highly pressurized water, sand and chemicals into underground rock formations. Fracking has driven the boom in U.S. oil production and contributed to the steep drop in gasoline prices, but the environmental impacts of this relatively new technique are not well understood. The EPA’s draft study—released in June to solicit input from advisers and the public—found  that fracking has already contaminated drinking...

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HERE’S NEW NEWS ABOUT PESTICIDES AND BEES...

Jan 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Nathanael Johnson Bees are struggling, and several environmental organizations want to try to help them out by banning neonicotinoid pesticides. Now the EPA has published an assessment showing that one particular neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid, hurts bees. If you know about the travails of bees, but you’re a normal person who doesn’t follow this stuff obsessively, you are probably thinking one of two things: 1. Wait, haven’t we known for years that neonics are killing bees? 2. Wait, I thought I heard that neonics weren’t the problem! Does this prove that they actually are? Each of these starting places is part right, but also part wrong — so let’s back up one step. Background First, it’s crucial to zero in on what “killing bees” means. There’s a lot of overheated rhetoric about honeybees going extinct; that’s just not happening. There’s also...

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Headaches and Nosebleeds Reported as Months-Long Methane Leak Continues in Los Angeles (VIDEO)...

Dec 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Over 1,000 families have chosen to relocate and the school district recently authorized the two local schools to move out of the area. By Hilary Lewis / Earthworks  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Lano Lan/Shutterstock Have you ever seen methane? What about benzene? Or the chemical the gas company adds to make your stovetop gas stink, mercaptan? I asked residents at a Save Porter Ranch meeting in northwest Los Angeles if they had seen the pollution they knew was in their community, pouring down from the SoCal Gas storage facility on the hill behind town. No one responded. For months now, methane pollution has been billowing from the breached facility into their community. Families have reported bad odors resulting in headaches and nosebleeds. Over 1,000 families have already chosen to relocate and the...

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Owner Of Mine That Spilled Toxic Waste Into A Colorado River Compares The EPA To Rapists...

Dec 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Nicole Gentile – Guest Contributor & Jessica Goad -CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Brennan Linsley In this Aug. 14, 2015 photo, water flows through a series of sediment retention ponds built to reduce heavy metal and chemical contaminants from the Gold King Mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about 1/4 mile downstream from the mine, outside Silverton, Colo.   Photos of the bright-orange colored Animas River in southwestern Colorado made international headlines in August after three million gallons of toxic mining sludge poured into it. Contractors working for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally released the waste while attempting to clean up the site, abandoned by its original owners decades ago. But now, three months later, the owner of the Gold King Mine told the Durango Herald that it’s he who feels “victimized”...

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AS STATE POLITICIANS RESIST OBAMA’S CLIMATE PLAN, WEST VIRGINIANS BUILD RENEWABLES ANYWAY...

Nov 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Mary Hansen, YES! Magazine | Report So far, the state isn’t stepping up to build a solar-powered future. That leaves the bulk of the work to West Virginia’s residents. (Photo: Installing solar panels via Shutterstock) West Virginia’s attorney general, Patrick Morrissey, and attorneys general from 23 other states filed a lawsuit against the Obama administration. At issue was the Clean Power Plan, which aims to cut carbon emissions from the power sector by 32 percent by 2030, in an effort to hold off climate change. The Environmental Protection Agency, responsible for enforcing the new rules, has suggested three strategies that states can combine as they see fit to achieve the cuts: make coal-fired power plants more efficient; meet new energy needs with natural gas; and develop renewable sources like wind and...

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