Noam Chomsky: Why the Republican Party Is a Threat to Human Survival...

Jan 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Election 2016 Sanders has the best policies; GOP must be stopped at all costs. By Sarah Lazare / AlterNet Photo Credit: photo story/Shutterstock.com Renowned scholar and activist Noam Chomsky declared this week that the GOP and its far-right front-runners are “literally a serious danger to decent human survival.” Speaking with The Huffington Post on Monday, Chomsky cited the Republican Party’s refusal to tackle—or even acknowledge—the “looming environmental catastrophe” of climate change, thereby “dooming our grandchildren.” He went to rebuke the Republican party for its “abject service to private wealth and power” and dispossession of the poor. But Chomsky made it clear that his conviction that “the Republican Party has drifted off the rails” and must be stopped by no means amounts to an endorsement of Democratic hopeful Hillary Clinton—who he has previously criticized...

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THE RIGHT-WING CLIMATE-DENIAL MACHINE IS CHURNING FASTER THAN EVER...

Jan 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock   By Heather Smith  GRIST In 2000, two sociologists at Washington State University, Aaron McCright and Riley Dunlap, examined all of the writing that conservative think tanks in the U.S. and Canada had published on the subject of climate change. The result of their labors — titled Challenging Global Warming as a Social Problem: An Analysis of the Conservative Movement’s Counter-Claims — was the first comprehensive look at how conservative think tanks were trying to shape the conversation on climate.Now, in a new study, Constantine Boussalis and Travis G. Coan, political scientists at Trinity College Dublin and the University of Exeter, respectively, have set out to update that information. Sure, you worked hard to discredit climate science in the ’90s, conservative think tanks. But what have you done for us lately? The conservative think tanks that are now...

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MAP SHOWS HOW MICHIGAN’S LEAD PROBLEM EXTENDS FAR BEYOND THE FLINT WATER CRISIS...

Jan 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] iStockphoto By Aura Bogado THINK PROGRESS Flint is Michigan’s poster child for environmental disaster — a crisis that could have been avoided. As my colleague Raven Rakia has pointed out, lead exposure, which causes an array of health problems and is especially bad for children, is completely preventable. But that doesn’t mean that those responsible for public health do their jobs. In Flint, a city that’s nearly 60 percent black and where more than 42 percent of residents live below the poverty line, officials switched to a cheaper water source. That source was cheaper for a reason: The water was polluted and corrosive. So it leached lead from the old pipes when they piped it in. That burdened local residents with water that’s been making them sick for more than a year. But high levels...

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DON’T WATER DOWN THE COASTAL COMMISSION!...

Jan 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The California Coastal Commission may be buckling to pressure from developers. We must act now! The California Coastal Commission is considering firing its Executive Director, Charles Lester. But make no mistake about it. This is part of the same old agenda–with more powerful special interests than ever before–to turn the Coastal Commission into a rubber stamp for developers. Read these articles and listen to these news stories. Then share them with your social networks! Los Angeles Times Lester was given the choice to step aside but he chose a public hearing to give the public a chance to hear what the debate’s really about. Read Now KPCC Environmental activists suspect some commis-sion members want to push out Lester to make way for management that would be more welcoming to development. Susan Jordan of the California Coastal Pro-tection Network said Lester’s...

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WHY BIG BLIZZARDS IN WINTER DON’T DISPROVE GLOBAL WARMING...

Jan 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AerisWeather   Another epic blizzard threatens 50 million people on the East Coast, with a bulls-eye on Washington DC. And leading climatologists again explain how human-induced climate change, especially warming-fueled ocean temperatures, are super-charging the amount of moisture in the atmosphere the storm will dump on us. First, though, I think the name, Winter Storm Jonas, doesn’t do justice to this blizzard, especially since the Jonas brothers are a pretty harmless pop rock band. I’m suggesting the name, Superstorm (Edward) Snowed-In: Because it will turn DC upside down, bring the government to a standstill, and then flee the country. Seriously, though, please take this superstorm seriously. As meteorologist Paul Douglas notes, “The Washington D.C. office of the National Weather Service issued a Blizzard Watch for the first...

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SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING THAT MAKES SENSE...

Jan 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture There was a time when American single family homes weren’t so absurdly large. In 1950, the average household had 3.83 people and the average new single family home was 983 sq ft, making for a pretty reasonable 291 sq ft per person. Compare that to 2014, when the average household had 2.54 people and the average new single family home was 2,690 sq ft, or 1059 sq ft per person. That’s a 360% increase in per capita housing size. Yikes! What’s worse is this continual embiggening of the American home has dwindled the options of modestly sized homes for those who want them. We frequently get notes from people who want to downsize, but say they are forced into homes larger than they want because there’s virtually nothing...

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HOW MELTING GIANT ICEBERGS MAY HELP SLOW CLIMATE CHANGE (JUST A LITTLE) WHO KNEW?...

Jan 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Jacqueline Howard Associate Science Editor, The Huffington Post Eastcott Momatiuk via Getty Images Water dripping off of icebergs in the Antarctic Ocean contains nutrients for phytoplankton, which can help absorb carbon dioxide. Melting icebergs may be fighting against the very forces that cause them to melt, a new study suggests. Water dripping off icebergs and into the Antarctic Ocean, also known as the Southern Ocean, contains iron and other nutrients, according to research published Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience. These nutrients fertilize phytoplankton, the microscopic marine life that plays a key role in oceanic ecosystems, and help the tiny plants absorb carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as they grow into plumes. In other words, there might be even more carbon dioxide in our atmosphere if it weren’t for the help of phytoplankton, said Dr. Grant Bigg,...

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NEW HOUSE BILL GIVES AWAY PUBLIC LANDS, CREATES PSEUDO-WILDERNESS AREAS...

Jan 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Jenny Rowland — Guest Contributor CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Rick Bowmer Rob Bishop, left, R-Utah, holds an image he says is misleading and was created by critics of his public lands proposal while speaking during a news conference, as Rep. Jason Chaffetz, center, R-Utah, and Utah Gov. Gary Herbert, right, looks on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016, at the Utah State Capitol, in Salt Lake City. Representatives Rob Bishop (R-UT) and Jason Chaffetz (R-UT) released a long-awaited public lands bill Wednesday that, if passed, would affect 18 million acres of public lands in Eastern Utah. The proposal would downgrade protections for wilderness quality lands in the region, create new oil and gas drilling zones that are exempted from environmental protections, and hand over large areas of national public lands to private and state...

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THE FUTURE OF THE GRID IS HERE, IN THESE TWO PRODUCTS...

Jan 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock Rooftop solar plus storage installations can be combined to help manage the grid.   It’s no secret that solar power is having a moment. The renewable energy source has had year after year of record-breaking growth — and now employs more people than the coal industry. But the electrical grid can’t run off solar alone. In addition to the fact that it’s only expected to be 3 percent of generation by 2050, there is also the very basic problem that the sun only shines during the day, and we use electricity all the time. Enter electrical storage. The U.S. Department of Energy on Tuesday announced a round of new grants for research and development on solar plus storage — what the head of the solar industry...

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THERE IS SOMETHING ODD AND OMINOUS AFOOT IN GREENLAND. DID A HUGE MELT WATER PULSE OCCUR ON 1-16-16?...

Jan 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Pakalolo  DAILY KOS   RSS REBLOGGED BY Climate Change SOS After the last ice age, glacial melt caused sea levels to rise rapidly by 120 meters. Large expanses of land that were once migratory paths and habitations for prehistoric civilizations gradually submerged through a series of catastrophic floods and mega-tsunami. (Meltwater Pulse 1A and 2B are discussed in the video at the bottom of this story.) If this event in Greenland is the start of another Meltwater Pulse we are effed. From Robert Scribbler. The remnants of hurricane Alex were pulled into a storm system just south of Greenland on Friday January 15, 2016. An event that then flooded both Baffin Bay and Western Greenland with warm, tropical air. At the same time, Greenland observers both noted what appears to be ice mass losses over...

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GREENS BASH HEADS OVER HOW TO DEAL WITH WILDFIRES...

Jan 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Katie Herzog GRIST There’s little doubt that wildfires are getting bigger, badder, and more damaging across the globe, but the question of how to deal with them is dividing environmentalists. According to most calculations, 2015 was a record-setting year for wildfires in the U.S. By the end, more than 10 million acres had burned across the country. Many of these were in the Western states, where hellish, otherworldly burns took over in normally temperate states like Washington and Alaska. In Boise, Idaho, a 100-foot-tall “firenado” sprouted from a blaze. California alone experienced more than 6,300 wildfires. The U.S. Forest Service recently named last year’s fire season as the worst in history. But this, according to some environmentalists, was a mistake — and one that’s only going to make the problem worse. The response to wildfires is generally to fight them: 1,200...

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BIRDS ARE GOING EXTINCT: ENTIRE SPECIES ARE HANGING BY THEIR WINGTIPS....

Jan 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] SALON.COM Deforestation and the pet trade have ravaged avian populations, and the consequences for mankind could prove dire Gerardo Ceballos, Anne H. Ehrlich and Paul R. Ehrlich, Earth Island Journal A visit to the California Academy of Sciences, located in San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park, speaks volumes about the disaster that has befallen birds with the spread of humanity. A maze of narrow corridors in the scientific collections leads an explorer to the Ornithological Collection. There you will find a cabinet with a sign: “Extinct Birds.” If you look inside, you’ll experience a dreadful moment as you take in
the sight of specimens of species that no longer exist. Your eyes will move from the imperial woodpecker and the passenger pigeon to the Guadalupe Island petrel, among many others. Each is carefully preserved in...

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THE PROBLEM WITH ROOFTOP SOLAR THAT NOBODY IS TALKING ABOUT...

Jan 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Where does the green energy from your panels really go? —By Tim McDonnell   MOTHER JONES A couple of years ago, Steven Weissman, an energy lawyer at the University of California-­Berkeley, started to shop around for solar panels for his house. It seemed like an environmental no-brainer. For zero down, leading residential provider SolarCity would install panels on his roof. The company would own the equipment, and he’d buy the power it produces for less than he had been paying his electric utility. Save money, fight climate change. Sounds like a deal. But while reading the contract, Weissman discovered the fine print that helps make that deal possible: SolarCity would also retain ownership of his system’s renewable energy credits. It’s the kind of detail your average solar customer wouldn’t notice or maybe care about....

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STAGGERED STARTER HOME PROJECT IN NEW ORLEANS...

Jan 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] 0 OJT develops staggered starter home* project in new orleans all images © william crocker       developed as an opportunistic and affordable urban housing program by new orleans-based studio OJT (office of jonathan tate). ‘starter home*’ explores the relevant and increasing problem of entry-level homes, while pairing contemporary design and addressing environmental concerns.     the project, led by architect jonathan tate has been designed to cater to a range of buyers; from people buying for the first time; downsizing; densification through infill of overlooked odd or irregular vacant land. the first starter home* has been launched in new orleans, located in the irish channel neighborhood of the american city. the concept forms an opportunistic urban housing program created to develop affordable, entry-level homes       the designers sought out...

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THERE IS NO PLANET B: WE’RE NOT COLONIZING THE MILKY WAY ANY TIME SOON...

Jan 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Jenny McCarthy arrives at the American Music Awards at the Microsoft Theater on Sunday, Nov. 22, 2015, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP) Forget what you saw in “Interstellar.” The odds of our successfully relocating to another planet are virtually nil Kim Stanley Robinson, Scientific American   There is no planet B: We’re not colonizing the Milky Way any time soon This article was originally published by Scientific American. The idea that humans will eventually travel to and inhabit other parts of our galaxy was well expressed by the early Russian rocket scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky, who wrote, “Earth is humanity’s cradle, but you’re not meant to stay in your cradle forever.” Since then the idea has been a staple of science fiction, and thus become part of a consensus image of humanity’s...

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56 INDIGENOUS CORN VARIETIES AT RISK AS MONSANTO EYES MEXICO...

Jan 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Lorraine Chow  ECOWATCH Mexico’s unique and treasured native corn varieties could be under threat as Monsanto, the world’s largest seed producer, vies to plant genetically modified (GMO) corn in the country. In August 2015, a Mexican judged overturned a September 2013 ban on GMO corn, thus opening more business opportunities for Monsanto and other agribusinesses pending favorable later court decisions. Monsanto even announced in October 2015 that it was seeking to double its sales in the country over the next five years. Chef Pancho Ibanez of Mexico City-based restaurant Pujol. He joins roughly 80 other Mexican chefs who are speaking out against GMO corn. Photo credit: Financial Times The GMO corn ban remains pending a ruling on the appeal, but a final decision could end up in Mexico’s supreme court. Monsanto, which is seeking five permits to grow...

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DAVID BOWIE WAS THE INTERNET BEFORE THE INTERNET EXISTED...

Jan 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Grist / Amelia Bates Our Bowies, Ourselves By Katharine Wroth   GRIST This is an environmental publication, so I can really only write this piece if I ask the following things: Did you know David Bowie was the headliner at the 1972 Friends of the Earth “Save the Whale” concert? Did you know the poster for that concert featured him perched on a harpoon? Did you know he donated (OK, deeply discounted the fee for) his song “Heroes” for use in “The Cove,” the 2009 documentary about dolphin hunting? Did you know he signed a petition urging climate action just this November? Used public transportation? Was compared to cicadas in a fabulously bizarre article in The Guardian? And did you know some creative individual manages a lyrics-powered Climate David Bowie account on Twitter? There...

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BIZARRE & DISTURBING HURRICANE ALEX FORMS IN ATLANTIC, HURRICAN PALI IN PACIFIC IN JANUARY...

Jan 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By FishOutofWater  VIA DAILY KOS   Hurricane Pali Tues Jan 12, 2016 near EQUATOR SW of Hawaii. Pali was the earliest hurricane to form in the central & eastern Pacific. Hurricane Pali is heading where no hurricane has gone before, within 5 degrees of the equator in the north central Pacific. Forecasters have been stunned by Pali. Tropical storms generally don’t form near the equator because they can’t develop enough spin there but a phenomenal atmospheric wave moved eastward along the equator all the way from the Indian ocean to the eastern Pacific over the last month. That massive wave of thunderstorms on both sides of the equator built a strong surge of westerly winds on the equator as it moved east. When those west winds reached the central Pacific where the Northeasterly...

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THERE WILL BE CHAOS: BIG OIL’S COLLAPSE AND THE BIRTH OF A NEW WORLD ORDER...

Jan 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Barrel prices have completely cratered. With alternative energies on the rise, geopolitics may never be the same Michael Klare, TomDispatch.com  VIA SALON.COM This piece originally appeared on TomDispatch. As 2015 drew to a close, many in the global energy industry were praying that the price of oil would bounce back from the abyss, restoring the petroleum-centric world of the past half-century.  All evidence, however, points to a continuing depression in oil prices in 2016 — one that may, in fact, stretch into the 2020s and beyond.  Given the centrality of oil (and oil revenues) in the global power equation, this is bound to translate into a profound shakeup in the political order, with petroleum-producing states from Saudi Arabia to Russia losing both prominence and geopolitical clout. To put things in perspective, it was...

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WE’VE FINALLY FIGURED OUT HOW CLIMATE CHANGE WILL BENEFIT FUTURE GENERATIONS...

Jan 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Katie Herzog When we talk about climate change, everyone is always going on about “saving future generations.” Well, what about the generations of 102,000 A.D.? Turns out we’re doing them a great favor! According to a study published in the journal Nature, climate change may have postponed the next ice age by as much as 50,000 years. Bloomberg reports: [R]esearchers in Germany were able to use computer models to replicate the last eight glacial cycles and provide predictions on when the next might occur. The scientists found that even without further output of heat-trapping gases, the next ice age probably wouldn’t set in for another 50,000 years. That would make the current so-called inter-glacial period “unusually long,” according to the lead author, Andrey Ganopolski. “However, our study also shows that relatively moderate additional anthropogenic CO2-emissions...

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Shocker: Govt. Scientists Admit They Deceived the Public About Fracking’s Impact on Drinking Water...

Jan 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] There will be heavy pressure to revise the EPA’s conclusion — and the oil and gas industry will have major egg on its face. By Justin Gardner / The Free Thought Project  VIA ALTERNET Five years ago, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was commissioned by Congress to undertake a study on the impacts of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) on drinking water. This newer method of oil and gas extraction involves the pumping of highly pressurized water, sand and chemicals into underground rock formations. Fracking has driven the boom in U.S. oil production and contributed to the steep drop in gasoline prices, but the environmental impacts of this relatively new technique are not well understood. The EPA’s draft study—released in June to solicit input from advisers and the public—found  that fracking has already contaminated drinking...

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U.S. SOLAR CREATED MORE JOBS THAN OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION...

Jan 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Ryan Koronowski CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jerry McBride Two of 105 solar panels are installed on the roof of a barn Thursday, Aug. 27, 2009, north of Hesperus, Colo.   Over the last year, the solar industry added jobs twelve times faster than the rest of the economy, even more than the jobs created by the oil and gas extraction and pipeline sectors combined. The Solar Foundation released its annual Solar Jobs Census Tuesday, and found that for the third straight year, the solar workforce grew 20 percent in the United States. According to the census, the industry added 35,052 jobs, elevating its grand total to 208,859. That builds on the 31,000 jobs added the year before, and 23,600 added the year before that. “It’s incredible,” SolarCity CEO and co-founder Lyndon Rive...

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CATTLE GRAZING IS A CLIMATE DISASTER, AND YOU’RE PAYING FOR IT...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] REUTERS/Max Whittaker By Ben Adler GRIST The rules governing cattle grazing on federal lands are so obscure that your average climate change correspondent hasn’t given much thought to them. But now that a gang of pathetic losers with guns has occupied a federal wildlife sanctuary in Oregon to gripe about the federal government’s audacity to set rules for how ranchers use publicly owned land, it’s worth taking a look at this policy. As it turns out, ranchers using federal land, like the Bundy family that is leading the occupation and the Hammond family in whose name they took up arms, are recipients of massive federal subsidies for activities that exacerbate climate change and damage sensitive ecosystems. It’s time the taxpayers stopped indulging these whiny welfare queens and kicked them off the dole. Why this...

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ONE OF THE LARGEST COAL COMPANIES IN THE U.S. JUST FILED FOR BANKRUPTCY...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File Black Thunder Mine, in Wyoming, is owned by Arch Coal Co. Arch Coal, one of the United States’ largest coal companies, filed for bankruptcy on Monday in the hopes of eliminating more than $4.5 billion in long-term debt, according to a press release issued by the company. The news comes as several of Arch’s competitors — Patriot Coal, Walter Energy, and Alpha Natural Resources — have also filed for bankruptcy. Arch Coal is the second largest supplier of coal in the United States behind Peabody Energy, and its mines represent 13 percent of America’s coal supply. …it shows that the second-largest coal company in the United States is unable to pay its debts and provide any return at all to its shareholders...

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ENERGY COMPANY WANTS TO LEGALLY DUMP COAL ASH WASTE INTO VIRGINIA RIVERS...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Alejandro Davila Fragoso The Possum Point Power Station will transfer millions of gallons of treated water from toxic coal ash ponds into Virginia’s Quantico Creek if the state water board decides Thursday to allow Dominion, an energy company, to do so. The same could happen in the James River with another Dominion owned facility.   DUMFRIES, VA — From their spacious living room, Taya Barnett and her husband Donald could look out the window Sunday afternoon and see Virginia’s Quantico Creek in all its grandeur. It was rainy but pleasant. Droplets fell here and there on the back porch. All while the blue sky revealed itself through the clouds that reflected on waters that flow through the largest protected natural area in the D.C. metropolitan...

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NEW MAP SHOWS THE IMPACT OF SEA LEVEL RISE...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] New Map Shows the Impact of Sea Level Rise THE DIRT by Jared Green World leaders have begun to get serious about fighting climate change, but the incredible risk of a rising sea remains in this century and far into the future. According to Climate Central, a research organization, a 4 degrees Celsius (7.2 degrees Fahrenheit) global temperature increase, which is our current path, could result in sea level rise that would submerge land where 470 – 760 million people now live. If the world’s governments actually meet the declared goal of the UN climate summit in Paris and reduce and draw down carbon emissions, keeping the world to a 2 °C warming (3.6 °F) temperature increase, 130 million would need to evacuate over coming decades. To understand how serious this could be, here’s some...

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BOOST YOUR SUSTAINABLE CITY AMBITIONS...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  THE DIRT BY JARED GREEN The American Architectural Foundation’s Sustainable Cities Design Academy (SCDA) is looking for innovative public-private partnerships with ambitious sustainable planning and design goals. Teams are encouraged to apply to participate in an intensive 2.5-day design workshop led by SCDA in Washington, D.C., August 3-5, 2016. Since 2009, SCDA has helped 55 project teams from 50 cities in the U.S. hone their sustainable plans and designs. Some recent highlights: Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania: In 2009, a team of planning officials and developers met to discuss how best to achieve their goal of urban, mixed-use development on the 1,000-acre former ship yard. The team sought guidance on “best practices in sustainable planning, design, and development, including strategies coordinated with the recently launched GreenPlan Philadelphia and LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED ND)...

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TO PRESERVE AND PROTECT: WORKING WITH ARBORISTS...

Jan 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View Johanna Phelps  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Tree 1199 post-construction and the newly planted landscape beyond, Governors Island, NYC. Image courtesy of Mathews Nielsen Our last post discussed the increasing formal integration of cyclists into streetscape design. Here we examine how arborists partner with landscape architects to ensure healthy environments for the trees that line our urban bike paths and enhance our public spaces. As landscape architects we love trees! Be they pre-existing or newly planted, trees are often the backbone to a site design. Mature, statuesque trees add invaluable character to a place and are often a site’s greatest asset or attraction. Take for instance the Queens Giant, a tulip tree located in Alley Park Pond in Queens; it’s an estimated 350-450 years old, possibly the oldest living thing in New York...

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ALL IS NOT OK: OKLAHOMA RECORDS 70 EARTHQUAKES IN A WEEK...

Jan 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Katie Herzog   GRIST Hold on to your butts, Oklahoma: The big one’s a coming. The state experienced two of its largest earthquakes on record this week, measuring 4.7 and 4.8 on the Richter scale. And, the New York Times reports, this could be a harbinger of things to come. Big things. From the Times: The two quakes followed a series of smaller ones last week that peeled brick facades, toppled columns and caused a power failure in Edmond, an upscale Oklahoma City suburb. Some experts said those quakes hinted at the possibility of a larger shock. “I do think there’s a really strong chance that Oklahoma will receive some strong shaking,” said Daniel McNamara, a research geophysicist at the National Earthquake Information Center in Colorado, who has followed the state’s quakes. Referring to...

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HERE’S WHAT OBAMA CAN STILL DO TO FIGHT CLIMATE CHANGE IN HIS FINAL YEAR...

Jan 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Reuters / Carlos Barria By Ben Adler   GRIST There’s only one year left until President Obama leaves office, and there’s a fair chance he will be replaced by a climate science–denying Republican, perhaps one in the form of a comb-over-sporting reality TV star. So time may be running out for the U.S. to take meaningful actions to fight climate change. Obama already has some important climate achievements under his belt — most notably, paving the way for the Paris Agreement and cracking down on coal plant emissions through the Clean Power Plan. But there’s no way he can implement really big, comprehensive policy solutions — like a nationwide cap-and-trade system or a carbon tax — because Republicans dominate Congress. So what could Obama achieve in his last 12 months? Even without cooperation...

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