SEE HOW THE SIERRA CLUB’S LEADER IS TROLLING REPUBLICANS...

Jun 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  GRIST Sierra Club By Rebecca Leber The head of the Sierra Club is having some fun trolling the GOP.The Republican National Committee reportedly can’t find enough willing speakers to fill time at its convention in Cleveland a few weeks away. Politicians like Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) have refused the spotlight because they think the party’s presidential nominee, Donald Trump, is toxic. So Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, emailed RNC chair Reince Priebus on Wednesday and generously offered to step in during the party’s time of need. “I heard that you are having trouble finding speakers for the Republican National Convention in Cleveland,” Brune writes in his email. “Don’t worry — I’m here to help. I’d be happy to take the stage at the Republican National Convention, and discuss the future of energy...

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4 WAYS TO REDUCE YOUR HOME’S ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT...

Jun 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Reducing your home’s environmental impact begins with reducing its carbon footprint. Your home’s carbon emissions as a result of your activities, or its carbon footprint, can be reduced by making environmentally sounder decisions, upgrading appliances and using less energy while taking advantage of what nature has to offer. Here are four way to reduce your home’s environmental impact. Take Advantage of Nature To avoid turning on lamps and lights around your house during the daytime, take advantage of natural light. To do this, avoid crowding furniture around your windows or glass doors to allow natural light into your home. Do keep your refrigerator out of the sun so it doesn’t have to use as much energy to keep itself cool. In regards to your home’s outdoor landscape, trees are great for protection from...

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HOLY CRAP … THE TREES ON YOUR BLOCK ARE WORTH HOW MUCH MONEY?!...

Jun 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Scientists just showed that money really does grow on trees. Clayton Aldern   MOTHER JONES Sheila Fitzgerald/Shutterstock This story originally appeared on Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. It’s not easy to price a tree, but a group of researchers from the US Forest Service and UC Davis have tried to do exactly that. Working with a dataset of about 900,000 trees that line California’s public streets, the group sought to place a dollar value on the services those trees perform, which include “energy savings, carbon storage, air pollutant uptake, and rainfall interception.” Trees lining California’s public streets contribute about $1 billion annually to the state’s economy—nearly $111 per tree. All told, the researchers estimate the trees contribute about $1 billion annually—nearly $111 per tree for each of the state’s 9.1 million street trees....

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IT’S REALLY HARD TO DEAL WITH CLIMATE CHANGE. A NEW PODCAST TALKS IT OUT....

Jun 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock Hot Mic By Grist staff A podcast about our warming planet from some of the nation’s best-known climate commentators? To quote the God of Mischief (patron deity of both Grist and teen girls): “Well, I guess that’s worth a look.” Or in this case, a listen. In the first episode of “Warm Regards,” meteorologist and Slate writer Eric Holthaus, paleoecologist Jacquelyn Gill, and New York Times columnist Andy Revkin talk about one of our favorite subjects here at Grist: how to talk about climate change. Holthaus starts out with the confession that he’s terrified by global warming, and his co-hosts chime in on how they, too, came to fear the carbon-pocalypse. But how do you discuss the problem in a way that inspires action instead of terror? Take a listen to find...

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PINK SNOW LOOKS AWESOME, BUT IS ANOTHER CLIMATE CHANGE INDICATOR...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] GREEN It’s caused by a red algae, and it’s bad news for the Arctic.     Lydia O’Connor  The Huffington Post    <!– TAG START { player: “Embed Player”, owner: “Embed Company”, for: “Embed” } –><div class=”vdb_player vdb_5688f66de4b040e17d9912265688f5c1e4b0f2c97f395156″ vdb_params=”m.refbcid=56000e19e4b0e4e194b84b31&m.refpid=5668ae6ee4b0b5e26955d6a6″><script type=”text/javascript” src=”//delivery.vidible.tv/jsonp/pid=5688f66de4b040e17d991226/vid=576bf81fe4b08ecd3806c18b/5688f5c1e4b0f2c97f395156.js”> Some call it pink snow, some call it watermelon snow — and now, a new study is calling it yet another symbol of the drastic melting in the Arctic. The appearance of the so-called pink snow, which Arctic explorers have observed for centuries, is the result of a red algae that likes to bloom in the frozen water. In a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications, researchers found that those algal blooms are causing the ice to melt faster, and the algae is likely to grow more rapidly as climate...

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THE NEW LANDSCAPE DECLARATION: PERSPECTIVE AND CRITIQUE (PART 2)...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Dirt Contributo New Landscape Declaration / LAF The second day of the Landscape Architecture Foundation‘s New Landscape Declaration:  Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future offered critical responses to the 23 declarations delivered on the first day of the event and looked ahead to the next 50 years. Afternoon sessions were divided into five panels, each representing a different aspect of landscape architecture: academic practice, private practice, public practice, capacity building organizations, and emerging voices. Each panelist gave a short talk before engaging in a group discussion, addressing audience-sourced questions, and offering perspectives on what needs to be achieved over the next 50 years: Academic practice: Maintain the value of the “long view” “Academics combine teaching, scholarship, and service” while “taking the long view: looking back, then to now, and forward,” argued...

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THOUSANDS OF CITIES FROM SIX CONTINENTS JUST AGREED TO WORK ON CLIMATE CHANGE...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Stephane de Sakutin/Pool Photo via AP   Thousands of cities from six continents united Wednesday to create the largest global coalition committed to battling human-caused climate change and pushing the world into a low-carbon economy. The Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy unifies 7,100 cities encompassing more than half a billion people, the group said in a statement. Created some six months after the Paris accord, this global alliance aims for greater collaboration between cities and increased funding to support sustainable energy development. As more than half the world’s population lives in urban areas, cities are now major generators of greenhouse gas emissions. About 75 percent of global CO2 emissions come from cities, and most of those emissions are attributed to transportation and...

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THE MAJORITY OF WEST VIRGINIA IS UNDER A STATE OF EMERGENCY AFTER FLOODS DEVASTATE THE STATE...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Justin Michaels/The Weather Channel Flooding in White Sulfur Springs, WV. Forty-four of West Virginia’s 55 counties are under a state of emergency as severe weather and devastating floods have killed at least 14 residents and left hundreds of thousands without power. A spokesperson for West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin told ABC News that the floods, in some areas, had the potential to be “the worst in 100 years.” Severe rain and thunderstorms battered West Virginia for most of Thursday, leaving some parts of the state inaccessible due to damaged roads and infrastructure. At least four residents have died as a result of the floods, including an eight-year old boy who was swept away by flash flooding. A second toddler, between two and four years old,...

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Lawsuit Reveals Extent of DuPont’s Decades-Long Cover Up Behind Cancer-Causing Teflon Chemical...

Jun 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Chemical giant DuPont is in court defending their decision to poison entire communities by releasing a toxic chemical known as C8 into the Ohio River. By Farron Cousins / DeSmogBlog  VIA ALTERNET DECEMBER 2013 – BERLIN: the logo of the brand “Du Pont”. Photo Credit: 360b/Shutterstock Corporate heavyweight DuPont is back in court right now, defending their decision to poison entire communities along the Ohio River by releasing a toxic chemical known as C8 into the river. C8 is a chemical that is used in the manufacturing of the company’s blockbuster product Teflon. The case alleges that DuPont officials were intimately aware of the dangerous side effects of C8 exposure but still decided to allow exposure among workers and by releasing the chemical into the environment. Once the chemicals were dumped into the Ohio River,...

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CLIMATE CHANGE, FOSSIL FUELS ARE HURTING OUR KIDS...

Jun 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Children under 5 bear the brunt of disease and problems from climate change and fossil-fuel combustion. It’s time to do something about it. By Frederica Perera | BILL MOYERS.COM A child in an area affected by a drought in the southern outskirts of Tegucigalpa on April 22, 2016. (Photo by Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images) This post originally appeared at Environmental Health News. Editor’s note: The following opinion piece written for EHN accompanies Perera’s commentary on fossil fuels and children’s health published June 21 in the Environmental Health Perspectives journal.  Children suffer the most from fossil-fuel burning. Fossil-fuel combustion and associated air pollution and carbon dioxide (CO2) is the root cause of much of children’s ill health today, as well as their uncertain future. There are strong scientific arguments, as well persuasive economic ones,...

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BREAKING: THOUSANDS OF GALLONS OF CRUDE OIL HAVE SPILLED FROM A SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PIPELINE...

Jun 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong   According to the Ventura County fire department, up to 700 barrels of crude oil — some 29,000 gallons — have spilled from a pipeline in southern California. Initial reports placed the amount of oil spilled from the pipeline at 5,000 barrels, or 210,000 gallons, but those totals were revised as of Thursday morning. Officials are relying on a natural catch basin that exists in the area to capture the oil while crews build larger barriers, according to the Los Angeles Times. As of Thursday afternoon, U.S. Coast Guard officials confirmed that no oil from the spill had reached the ocean, and no homes in the area had been evacuated. At least some of the oil in the pipeline comes from an oil...

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NEIL DE GRASSE TYSON AND AL GORES EXPLORE CLIMATE CHANGE, LIFE IN A NAVAL OBSERVATORY AND MORE...

Jun 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Andrew C. Revkin   NY TIMES   Former Vice President Al Gore discussed climate change science and activism on Neil deGrasse Tyson’s StarTalk program.Credit StarTalk/ Laura Berland Earlier this year, the astrophysicist and science-literacy evangelist Neil deGrasse Tyson recorded a conversation for his Star Talk Radio program with former Vice President Al Gore exploring Gore’s decades-long campaign for action to stem climate change, what it’s like to live in the United States Naval Observatory (the official vice presidential residence), the path from the vice president’s “GoreSat” vision in 1998 to the functioning Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite, and more. Tyson then invited me into the studio to discuss Gore’s career and comments, along with his smartly comedic co-host, Maeve Higgins. The topics included paths to a world with abundant clean energy, Gore’s thoughts on trends in...

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THE WORLD’S DISAPPEARING SAND...

Jun 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By VINCE BEISER THE NEW YORK TIMES Credit Sally Deng MOST Westerners facing criminal charges in Cambodia would be thanking their lucky stars at finding themselves safe in another country. But Alejandro Gonzalez-Davidson, who is half British and half Spanish, is pleading with the Phnom Penh government to allow him back to stand trial along with three Cambodian colleagues. They’ve been charged, essentially, with interfering with the harvesting of one of the 21st century’s most valuable resources: sand. Believe it or not, we use more of this natural resource than any other except water and air. Sand is the thing modern cities are made of. Pretty much every apartment block, office tower and shopping mall from Beijing to Lagos, Nigeria, is made at least partly with concrete, which is basically just sand and...

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26 MILLION TREES DIED IN CALIFORNIA IN JUST ONE YEAR...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The mortality rate is unprecedented and will fuel the state’s fire season. Sequoia National Park. (Photo: USFS Region 5/Flickr) TAKE PART DAILY Taylor Hill The number of dead trees in California’s forests dramatically increased in just one year’s time. The latest survey from the United States Forest Service revealed that an additional 26 million trees have succumbed to drought, a devastating bark beetle infestation, and hotter temperatures in 2015. That brings the number of trees that have died in the Sierra Nevada to 66 million since 2010. For a state already in the throes of fire season, the discovery of a 65 percent increase in the number of dead trees within its forests is a troubling sign. “These new numbers really show that the tree die-off is spreading at an astronomical rate,” said...

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EUROPE’S PRECIOUS BEECH FORESTS COULD SUCCUMB TO DROUGHT...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Kieran Cooke / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     A beech woods near Morganstown in South Wales, where tree growth rates are still affected by a drought 50 years ago. (Ben Salter via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Sunlight angling its way through the light green leaves of lines of beech trees is one of the most haunting features of the European spring. But new research shows that beech forests across Europe are vulnerable to changes in climate—in particular, to the effects of prolonged dry spells. At most risk of sudden and widespread reduced growth are beech forests in the south of the UK, an area where the species is at its most profuse. Scientists from the University of Stirling in Scotland report in Global Change...

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NOW RESIDENTS OF THE U.S.’S SECOND LARGEST PIG PRODUCING STATE CAN SEE WHERE THE WASTE FLOWS...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Emery Dalesio Manure is sprayed on a North Carolina field.   Livestock farming — especially hog and poultry farming — is big business in North Carolina. The country’s second-largest pig producer and third-largest chicken producer, North Carolina has thousands of farming operations clustered throughout the state. And while those farms produce billions of dollars in economic revenue, they also produce something far more sinister: millions of tons of animal waste that can make its way into the air or water, polluting nearby communities and watersheds. In an effort to help spotlight the issue of animal farming and waste disposal in North Carolina, Waterkeeper Alliance and the Environmental Working Group have teamed up to release a first-of-its-kind mapping project, detailing exactly where North Carolina’s hog and poultry...

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PIANO PERFORMANCE NEXT TO CRUMBLING GLACIER WILL GIVE YOU CHILLS...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Ice ice baby grand By Kate Yoder GRIST The Arctic Ocean may not be a typical venue for a piano performance, but it’s a prime setting for making a point about climate change. Ludovico Einaudi, an Italian composer-pianist, performed an original piece while stranded on an “artificial iceberg” (or rather, a floating platform made of white, wooden triangles) as Norway’s Wahlenbergbreen glacier collapsed in the background. Greenpeace shipped the baby grand piano from Germany to the Arctic for the stunt, which was meant draw attention to a proposal to create a sanctuary in 10 percent of the Arctic Ocean, protecting it from oil drilling, fishing trawlers, and other exploitation. There are no promises it will work, but enjoy the exciting performance on a stranded iceberg — no polar bears...

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The Scale of Global Wildlife Crime Is Massive, Reveals Shocking New Report...

Jun 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment The United Nations’ first-ever World Wildlife Crime Report reveals broad corruption facilitating illegal trade in plants and animals. By Apoorva Joshi / Mongabay   VIA ALTERNET Ivory Crush Event Photo Credit: italy.usembassy.gov The report was produced by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime using data on thousands of species and seizures from more than 120 countries. It found that trafficking is faciliated by widespread corruption at many levels of government and society, and that crimes are generally not restricted to certain countries. To better fight wildlife crime, officials urge a stepping-up of enforcement and monitoring, as well as increased transnational cooperation. Wildlife trafficking is a global problem, revealed the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in their first-ever World Wildlife Crime Report. Released late last month, the report finds, among...

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FRACKING PRODUCES TONS OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE. WHAT SHOULD WE DO WITH IT?...

Jun 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Byproducts of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, create radioactive waste like the truckload shown here in West Virginia. BIll Hughes down in the dumps By Jie Jenny Zou   GRIST Cross-posted from Center for Public Integrity The Marcellus Shale has transformed the Appalachian Basin into an energy juggernaut. Even amid a recent drilling slowdown, regional daily production averages enough natural gas to power more than 200,000 U.S. homes for a year. But the rise of hydraulic fracturing over the past decade has created another boom: tons of radioactive materials experts call an “orphan” waste stream. No federal agency fully regulates oil and gas drilling byproducts — which include brine, sludge, rock, and soiled equipment — leaving tracking and handling to states that may be reluctant to alienate energy interests. “Nobody can say how much of...

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WILDLIFE NEEDS NEW CORRIDORS TO ESCAPE RISING HEAT...

Jun 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Tim Radford / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     An otter tries to cross a road. Hard times are ahead for species that can find no safe passage to habitat. (Mandcrobertson via Wikimedia Commons) The piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—US scientists worried about what global warming and climate change may do to wildlife have come up with the ultimate in creature-friendly versions of road maps or highway patrols. They want to see natural corridors that link safe habitats and ecosystems, so that as conditions change, plants and animals—and the continental US is home to 800 species of bird, more than 400 kinds of mammal and more than 600 reptiles and amphibians—get a chance to migrate. And, they report, only 2% of the eastern US offers the climate connectivity—their word...

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WHY CATS AREN’T REPUBLICAN...

Jun 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By MessagingMatters Living with a cat for the first time, you quickly pick up on its behavioral quirks, many of which are common among other cats. What you soon find out is that cats aren’t Republican. Here are 12 reasons why not:1. Cats are curious about what you do in your bedroom, but they don’t try to legislate away your freedom to do it. 2. Cats may take away your cushion, but they’ll give it back to you with a gentle push. 3. Cats give you attention and sympathy when you’re sick. 4. Females are treated with importance in the cat world. 5. Cats make use of solar power, often all day long. 6. Cats lick their own problems and take care of other cats too. 7. Cats don’t blame black and...

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THE NEW LANDSCAPE DECLARATION: LOOKING BACK OVER THE LAST 50 YEARS...

Jun 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Dirt Contributor Manhattan smog in 1966 / Andy Blair At the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF)’s New Landscape Declaration: A Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future, which met in Philadelphia last week, more than 700 landscape architects offered personal declarations and contributed their ideas, all in an effort to shape the 50-year follow-up to LAF’s original declaration of concern, published in 1966 amid massive political and social change and an era of environmental degradation in the United States. Although the focus of the summit was on forging a new declaration and vision for the profession that can guide the efforts of landscape architects over the next five decades, there was also a call to “critically reflect on what landscape architecture has achieved over the last 50 years.” Amid all the declarations and...

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THE NEW LANDSCAPE DECLARATION: VISIONS FOR THE NEXT 50 YEARS...

Jun 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  BY  Jared Green India’s water crisis / National Geographic Over the next 50 years, landscape architects must coordinate their actions globally to fight climate change, help communities adapt to a changing world, bring artful and sustainable parks and open spaces to every community rich or poor, preserve cultural landscape heritage, and sustain all forms of life on Earth. These were the central messages that came out the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF)‘s New Landscape Declaration: Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future in Philadelphia, which was attended by over 700 landscape architects. The speakers used declarations and short idea-packed talks, and attendees used cards, polls, and an interactive question and commenting app to provide input into a new declaration — a vision to guide the efforts of landscape architects to 2066. As...

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THE WORLD AGREED TO NOT BURN MOST FOSSIL FUELS. WHY AREN’T THESE BANKS LISTENING?...

Jun 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Ryan Koronowski CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Flickr user Objectif Nantes Artist Isaac Cordal’s installation Waiting for Climate Change, Nantes, France, 2013   Last December, the world agreed in the historic Paris climate accord not to burn most fossil fuels. To do that, some of the lowest-hanging fruit is halting the investment of hundreds of billions of dollars into the most expensive and extreme fossil fuels: coal, Arctic oil drilling, tar sands, deep offshore drilling, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) export. So how is the world doing? “Needs improvement” would be putting it charitably, according to a new report looking at the world’s biggest private-sector banks, which are still funding the industries that drive climate change to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars. Shorting the Climate is the seventh edition of an...

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MULTIPLE WESTERN STATES ARE ABLAZE WITH WILDFIRES...

Jun 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila FragosoCLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Mark Nunez/Los Padres Forest Aviation/KEYT-TV via AP This photo provided by Los Padres Forest Aviation and KEYT-TV shows a wildfire burning in Los Padres National Forest, north of Santa Barbara, on Wednesday, June 15, 2016, in Goleta, Calif. The Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office says mandatory evacuations have been ordered for Refugio Canyon, Venadito Canyon and Las Flores Canyon, which includes an Exxonmobil refinery.   One injury has been reported and evacuations are underway in multiple western states Thursday as wildfires have grown in size, burning thousands of acres. Massive firefighting efforts are happening in California, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, and Utah, according to multiple reports. Here are the details on the states’ fires: Utah In Utah, one firefighter was injured while battling a fire near Cedar...

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IT’S THE FIRST NEW U.S. NUCLEAR REACTOR IN DECADES. AND CLIMATE CHANGE HAS MADE THAT A VERY BIG DEAL...

Jun 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Energy and Environment By Chris Mooney THE WASHINGTON POST In this April 29, 2015 photo, a home sits within view of the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant cooling towers Unit 1, left, and Unit 2 near Spring City, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski) This story has been updated. SPRING CITY, Tenn. — In an immaculate control room at the Watts Bar nuclear plant, green bars flash on a large screen, signaling something that has not happened in the United States in two decades. As control rods lift from the water in the core, and neutrons go about the business of splitting uranium atoms, life comes to a new nuclear reactor — the first in the country since its sister reactor here was licensed in 1996. By summer’s end, authorities expect the new reactor at this...

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COMMUNITY-SUPPORTED DEVELOPMENT: A FIRST STEP TO COMMUNITY SOLAR FOR ALL...

Jun 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE photo credit: Boardman Hill Solar Farm Communities are a critical actor in the global effort to combat climate change. More than 1,000 locally elected officials from around the world were present at the Paris Climate Conference talks. Their voices, representing distant communities, were widely recognized as drivers of the international agreement. In the United States, communities and governments continue to drive toward more sustainable, inclusive economies by leveraging local solar power—most recently, in the form of community-scale solar. A unique benefit of community-scale solar projects is their very community orientation, which enables “community-supported development.” This concept describes the range of activities that can be taken to reduce the cost of, and drive local interest in, community-scale solar. The communities taking action can include constituent- or community-based organizations, nonprofits, municipalities,...

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BRITAIN MIGHT LEAVE THE EUROPEAN UNION. HERE’S WHAT THAT COULD MEAN FOR CLIMATE...

Jun 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] REUTERS/Russell Boyce Should I Stay Or Should I Go? By Clayton Aldern GRIST On June 23, British voters will head to the polls to decide whether their nation should exit the European Union — or “Brexit,” as it were. Most of the discussion about the referendum has centered on the economy, jobs, and immigration. But what about the impact on the climate and the broader environment? Opinion is divided. Here are arguments from the two camps. Remain! Many environmental leaders are pushing to stay in the EU, including those at Friends of the Earth and Greenpeace. John Sauven, executive director of Greenpeace U.K., sums up their main point in a piece in the Guardian: “We have the EU to thank for higher standards on air and water pollution, waste and recycling, biodiversity conservation,...

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4 Things You Can Do to Help Out Threatened Honey Bees...

Jun 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Protecting pollinator health is an issue of global importance, but individuals can make a difference. By Danielle Nierenberg, Lani Furbank / Food Tank   VIA ALTERNET bee on flower Photo Credit: DoeLay/Flickr CC According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), approximately 80 percent of all flowering plant species reproduce with the help of pollinator animals like bees, butterflies, birds, and more. This accounts for at least one third of the world’s food crops, including tomatoes, pepper, strawberries, coffee, apples, carrots, almonds, cocoa, and thousands of others. Without pollinators, most plants could not produce fruits and seeds, and agricultural biodiversity would suffer–according to FAO, bees, bats, birds, and other pollinators, increase global food production by 87 percent. Unfortunately, the world is seeing a decline in pollinator populations. From land-use change and pesticide use...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (JUNE 1 – 15)...

Jun 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  J.R. Taylor A towering waterfall appears to fall from midair into the Grand Canal at the Palace of Versailles / Dezeen The Forgotten Space Under this Sao Paulo Highway Will Become a Hanging Garden and Park – Co.Exist, 6/2/16 “When an elevated highway was built in the middle of downtown São Paulo in 1971, the city said it was attempting to improve traffic. Instead, congestion got worse. The two-mile stretch of road, called Minhocão (‘Big Worm’) is now one of the most polluted parts of a city where smog kills thousands of people a year.” DLANDstudio Launches Phase 1 Design for Rails-to-Trails QueensWay – The Architect’s Newspaper, 6/2/16 “After years of debate over what to do with the 60-year old abandoned Rockaway Long Island Railroad (LIRR), the coalition has been moving...

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