National Lawyers Guild Statement of Solidarity with Standing Rock Sioux Tribe against Dakota Access Pipeline...

Aug 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Posted on August 29, 2016 Categories: Environmental Human Rights Committee, Indigenous Peoples Rights Committee, International Committee, News, Statements No comments yet The National Lawyers Guild (NLG), the oldest and largest human rights bar association in the United States, by its International Committee, its Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Committee and its Environmental Human Rights Committee, as well as the NLG’s Environmental Justice Committee, stands in solidarity with the sovereign Oceti Sakowin Oyate (the Great Sioux Nation), the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, and its people in their just opposition to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline across their sacred and ancestral lands. The United States has failed to respect the national sovereignty and interests of the Tribe and its people, has failed to respect the nation-to-nation relationship with the Tribe established by treaties, and has failed to...

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Climate Change Pledges Not Nearly Enough to Save Tropical Ecosystems...

Aug 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Jeremy Hance, Mongabay | News Analysis US Secretary of State John Kerry signs the Paris Agreement at the UN in New York while holding granddaughter Dobbs Higginson on his lap. Scientists warn that the agreement is insufficient to prevent disastrous climate change. (Photo courtesy of US Department of State) The Paris Agreement marked the biggest political milestone to combat climate change since scientists first introduced us in the late 1980s to perhaps humanity’s greatest existential crisis. Last December, 178 nations pledged to do their part to keep global average temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over preindustrial levels — adding on an even more challenging, but aspirational goal of holding temperatures at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). To this end, each nation produced a pledge...

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Here’s Why the Navajo Nation Is Suing the EPA Over Colorado’s Mining Catastrophe...

Aug 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Madeleine Thomas PACIFIC STANDARD The San Juan River is one of the most sacred and agriculturally important areas to the Navajo Nation. It’s also the site of a three-million-gallon toxic mine spill.   Residue from the release of mining chemicals sits on rocks in the Animas River in Durango, Colorado. (Photo: Theo Stroomer/Getty Images) This time last year, images of Colorado’s Animas River were going viral, leaving many mystified or downright disturbed by the waterway’s Willy Wonka-esque shade of golden orange. The culprit of the bizarre phenomenon: a slurry of mining chemicals which had burst from a sealed entryway to a defunct gold mine, the Gold King Mine, located upstream. The images were met with outrage: In the last year, there have been Congressional hearings and an ongoing criminal investigation into causes of...

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Egyptian researchers discover a way to grow forests in the desert with sewage...

Aug 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Julie M. Rodriguez  INHABITAT View Slideshow Desertification is a major issue throughout Africa, but there’s a simple way to stop the spread of deserts into fertile land: planting forests. The problem is that in the regions hardest hit by the phenomenon, there simply isn’t enough clean water to properly nurture the trees and keep them healthy. But an innovative project in Egypt proves that it can be done using repurposed wastewater instead of tapping into the sparse fresh water supply. The trees grown in the forest are thriving, and in fact, the eucalyptus trees have been found to produce wood at four times the rate of pine plantations in Germany. Located about two hours from Cairo, the Serapium forest is part of a program initiated by the Egyptian government in the...

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It Is Time to Begin the Process of Rebuilding Our Middle-Class Economy...

Aug 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Inequality Our collapse from an “opportunity for all” middle-class economy to a “winner-take-all,” dog-eat-dog system is behind many problems we face as a society. By Bill Moyers and David Bly An ice sculpture reading Middle Class is displayed as people gather to protest before the beginning of the Republican National Convention on August 26, 2012 in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images, Artwork by Nora Ligorano and Marshall Reese) In The New York Times recently, the paper’s former Washington bureau chief, the veteran journalist Hedrick Smith, asked an important question: “Can the States Save American Democracy?” Smith, who traveled the country to write his latest book, Who Stole the American Dream?, also serves as the executive editor of the Reclaim the American Dream website, where he keeps a keen eye on efforts to...

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Four Arrested In Protest, But Feds Continue With Plan To Sell The Gulf To Oil Interests...

Aug 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Another 138,000 acres off Louisiana’s coasts will be explored for oil. Activists deliver flood debris to the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management in New Orleans on Tuesday, the day before the agency leased more Gulf waters for oil extraction. CREDIT: COURTESY 350.ORG Four people were arrested for trespassing at the New Orleans office of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) on Tuesday, after they delivered a petition with nearly 200,000 signatures calling for President Obama to cancel plans to lease off parts of the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas development. “We tied the recent flooding to the effects of climate change and the ongoing drilling in the Gulf,” said one of the arrested activists, retired teacher Renate Heurich, 61. BOEM auctioned more than 138,000 acres of the Gulf to oil...

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From Glacierless National Park to the Neverglades: Meet your future national parks...

Aug 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Human/Nature By Kate Yoder   GRIST.ORG On their 100th anniversary, Grist is exploring America’s national parks and the humans who use them. See the full series. The famous landscapes we love are changing in mostly imperceptible ways, except to the scientists who study them. Climate change is altering them slowly and irrevocably, and soon enough the effects will be obvious to the naked eye. Towering redwoods and sequoias will be sucked dry, turning into brittle trees with brown leaves and cracked bark. Glorious, snowcapped mountains will transform into rocky, barren peaks. In our lifetimes, the national parks will face an identity crisis. They’re named for glaciers and forests that once seemed impervious to time, but are gradually vanishing. Will we keep their names as an ode to the defining features we once cherished? Or...

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The Long Strange Journey Of Earth’s Traveling Microbes...

Aug 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Airborne microbes can travel thousands of miles and high into the stratosphere. Now scientists are beginning to understand the possible role of these microbes — such as bacteria, fungal spores, and tiny algae — in creating clouds, causing rain, spreading disease, and even changing climate. by fred pearce Consider the African rain dance. People in tribal costumes stamping the ground to make rain — it’s nonsense, you might say. Except that we now know it could actually work. If you have enough dancers, there may be no better way to make rain, because bugs in the soil and surface vegetation make exceptionally good cloud- and ice-condensation nuclei — and rain dances stir them up. Microbes, it turns out, are the hidden players in the atmosphere, making clouds, causing rain, spreading diseases between continents,...

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Solar Delivers Cheapest Electricity ‘Ever, Anywhere, By Any Technology’...

Aug 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Joe Romm Dr. Joe Romm is Founding Editor of Climate Progress, “the indispensable blog,” as NY Times columnist Tom Friedman describes it.   Half the price of coal! Chile exceeded 1000 Megawatts of solar this year. CREDIT: ACERA. Chile has just contracted for the cheapest unsubsidized power plant in the world, Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) reports. In last week’s energy auction, Chile accepted a bid from Spanish developer Solarpack Corp. Tecnologica for 120 megawatts of solar at the stunning price of $29.10 per megawatt-hour (2.91 cents per kilowatt-hour or kwh). This beats the 2.99 cents/kwh bid Dubai received recently for 800 megawatts. For context, the average residential price for electricity in the United States is 12 cents per kilowatt-hour. “Solar power delivers cheapest unsubsidised electricity ever, anywhere, by any technology,” BNEF Chair...

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GREEN CITIES THAT MIGHT SURPRISE YOU...

Aug 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] When people think of living in a green city, many automatically picture Portland, Oregon. While Portland is an icon for the green city movement, there are many cities out there that offer a similar lifestyle. From public transportation to eco-friendly housing to sprawled urban parks, there are a number of places that provide the green lifestyle you want. Here’s a closer look at how a few cities are upping their eco-friendliness. Bikeability The best way cities up their green factor is with savvy solutions to age-old problems. For example, cities like Minneapolis have dedicated time and money to improve their infrastructure for cyclists. Both segregated bike lanes and public bike racks helped rank Minneapolis at the top of bike-friendly cities, but Bicycling.com also determined this rank based on how nice inhabitants are toward...

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How Do We Transition from a World of Domination and Extraction to a World of Resilience and Regeneration?...

Aug 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Local Peace Economy At the New Economy Coalition conference, activists build the road by walking. By Mariana Mendoza / AlterNet Photo Credit: CODEPINK How do we transition from a world of domination and extraction to a world of resilience and regeneration? How do we move away from a system that has been ingrained in most of our daily activities and thoughts and grow with the values that support justice and wellness? Throughout my work in the social, economic and environmental justice movement, I have been asking these questions and trying to figure out how to be resilient and regenerative and not repeat the failures of the exploitative and extractive economy. This July, I had the great opportunity to attend to to the New Economy Coalition’s conference CommonBound, where brilliant and powerful people got...

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REFORESTATION CAN TURN BACK THE CARBON CLOCK...

Aug 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG Martin Brigden / (CC-BY-2.0) LONDON—The ecological and carbon cost of rainforest destruction goes on accumulating for years after nations halt the conversion of canopy into farmland, scientists have found. This implies that to meet ambitious targets, global strategies to combat climate change—including forest restoration—should have started years ago. Tropical forests soak up vast quantities of carbon dioxide released by industrial combustion of fossil fuels, limiting global warming. Burning, clear-felling and ploughing of forest lands release centuries of stored carbon back into the atmosphere to accelerate global warming and climate change. So forest conservation and carbon emissions reduction are both vital parts of any strategies to contain global temperature rises. Researchers report in the journal Current Biology that they looked at the history of forest clearance...

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I Can’t Stop Reading One-Star Yelp Reviews of National Parks...

Aug 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] “I really wanted to enjoy this canyon…” Tim Murphy   MOTHER JONES Grand Canyon National Park/Flickr The National Park Service turns 99 years old on Tuesday. To celebrate, the Department of the Interior has waived admission fees for all NPS sites for the day. That’s a pretty sweet deal. You should stop reading this right now, call in sick, and enjoy the great outdoors. National parks are great. But not everyone agrees. Yelp is filled with one- and two-star reviews of America’s most pristine and majestic natural wonders. And honestly, they’re riveting. What makes a national park a one-star destination varies from one reviewer to the next. Maybe the tacos at the visitor center aren’t up to snuff. Maybe it was cloudy. Maybe the park was too cowardly to cut down some trees for spillover...

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HOPES RISE FOR UNDERGROUND CARBON STORAGE SCHEME...

Aug 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     A cold-water geyser from an unplugged oil exploration well in Utah. (Mike Bickle / Cambridge Centre for CCS) LONDON—Geologists have resolved one great problem about the capture of carbon dioxide from coal-fired or gas-fired power stations and its sequestration deep in the Earth, with what appears to be the prospect of rock-solid carbon storage. Once there in the right rock formations, there’s no reason why it should escape. That is, it won’t react with groundwater, corrode the rocks around it and dissolve its way back to the surface in 10,000 years—or even 100,000 years. And scientists report in Nature Communications journal that they can say this with confidence because they have identified natural reservoirs of CO2 at least 100,000 years old, deep...

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Report: Deadly ‘Smoke Waves’ Will Inundate the West as Wildfires Grow...

Aug 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Climate change is accelerating fires that produce dangerous levels of pollution. A firefighter pulls a hose while battling flames in the Sand Fire in Placerita Canyon in Santa Clarita, California, on July 24. (Photo: David McNew/Getty Images) David Kirby has been a professional journalist for 25 years. His third book, Death at Seaworld, was published in 2012.   As wildfires ravage California and other parts of the American West, a new study warns that choking “smoke waves” from fires will become more frequent, severe, and long lasting as climate change warms the atmosphere. The study includes an interactive map of 561 Western counties that allows the public, scientists, and policy makers to view recent and projected smoke waves—defined as two or more consecutive days with high levels of particulate matter...

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They survived Hurricane Katrina and rebuilt in Baton Rouge. Now they’ve lost everything again....

Aug 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Post Nation By Emma Brown, Ashley Cusick and Mark Berman Tristan, 7, and Jaydan Rose, 6, help their parents remove flooded furniture from their home in Central, La. (Courtesy of Trinice Rose) BATON ROUGE — When Hurricane Katrina leveled New Orleans, thousands of people left behind their ruined homes and took refuge here. They found new jobs and rebuilt their homes. Slowly, things started to feel normal again. But then a nameless storm brought unprecedented flooding to Baton Rouge and a wide swath of southern Louisiana over the last week. Countless Katrina survivors have been left, for a second time, with nothing. “Everything was going good,” said Trinice Rose, a nurse who escaped her home near Baton Rouge on foot as the floodwater rose — 11 years to the month after her home...

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Here’s how life looks on Louisiana’s forgotten coastline...

Aug 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Levee on Route 46, Saint Bernard, Louisiana. Virginia Hanusik down by the backwater By Laura Bliss  GRIST This story was originally published by CityLab and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The coast of southeast Louisiana is disappearing faster than anywhere else in the world — scientists estimate a football field of land is lost to rising sea levels every hour. With the earth literally shifting beneath their feet, communities have to adapt. Many families are stalwartly digging in, elevating their properties to precarious heights, though perhaps no more precarious than the conditions they’re responding to. Other residents appear to be living life as usual, enjoying the degree of comfort that comes with living inside the region’s extensive flood protection system. Some are even building anew. Those situated outside...

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How farms can heal forests — or even make them...

Aug 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] ISDSI By Grist staff This article is published in partnership with: Aspiration Let’s admit it, guys: Trees are pretty awesome. They’re nature’s air conditioners, they’re hella pretty to look at, and they’re really efficient carbon sinks. And, it turns out, when they come together to form a forest, trees gain the superpower of living pretty much forever. (The Amazon forest — what’s left of it, that is — has been breathing for about 55 million years, and it’s not even the most ancient on the planet.) The forest ecosystem — bugs, soil, logs dead or alive, roots, shrubs, creepers, vines, trees, and all — is one hell of a long-term polyamorous relationship. So here’s an idea: What if everything in that long-living ecosystem were edible? What if the entire forest were an agricultural...

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The Toxic Legacy of Racism and Nuclear Waste Is Very Much Still With Us in Los Alamos...

Aug 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] A company town where the business is nuclear weapons. By Taryn Fivek / AlterNet Photo Credit: Steve Shoup / Shutterstock NEW MEXICO—The air is crisp, cool and fresh. The sun is warm, but not too much. Residents picnic at a pond complete with cruising swans and ducks. The vistas of the Jemez Mountains and the mesas of the Pajarito Plateau are breathtaking. Flowers are in bloom. Everything is green. The historical structures are quaint and rustic, ranch-style houses made of wood and corrugated tin. The city is quiet and peaceful, a perfect slice of small-town America. It’s difficult at times to remember that this is the part of the world where the nuclear bomb was invented. It’s hard to picture the hundreds of thousands who died in Hiroshima and Nagasaki while standing in this environment, filling your lungs with fresh air; difficult to imagine the...

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The Latest California Wildfire Just Devastated an Area Still Rebuilding From Last Year’s Blazes...

Aug 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] What’s missing from the media right now…and our experiment to fix it MOTHER JONES Lake County’s Clayton Fire is only five percent contained. Will GreenbergAug. 15, 2016 7:21 PM Courtesy of Cal Fire Lake County, California is ablaze again. A wildfire erupted there on Saturday night, and has already burned 4,000 acres and is only 5 percent contained. The cause of the fire remains unknown.The blaze comes just as the county had started to rebuild from last year’s calamitous fire season. Three major fires—the Valley Fire, the Rocky Fire, and the Jerusalum Fire—took out thousands of buildings and over 170,000 acres in 2015. The Valley Fire, the largest of the three, destroyed nearly 2,000 buildings itself, and killed four people.   More than 9,000 firefighters are currently addressing 8 large fires across the...

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Watch the Film That Reveals the Pollution Crisis You Didn’t See at the Rio Olympics...

Aug 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] ‘The Discarded’ director Annie Costner talks about telling the stories of Rio residents fighting to clean up an environmental disaster in Guanabara Bay. Trash floats in Guanabara Bay, site of sailing events for the Rio 2016 Olympic Games. (Photo: Matthew Stockman/Getty Images) Aug 16, 2016 Todd Woody is TakePart’s editorial director, environment.   With the Summer Olympics under way in Rio de Janeiro, the global media has focused on athletes’ fears about the horrific pollution of Guanabara Bay, the arena for swimming, sailing, rowing, and windsurfing competitions. Filmmakers Annie Costner and Adrienne Hall wanted to tell a different story—one about the impact on Cariocas, as Rio’s residents are called, of the untold tons of untreated sewage and garbage that pour into the bay, litter its shores, and clog its tributaries. Their 18-minute documentary,...

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Giant Coral Reef in Protected Area Shows New Signs of Life...

Aug 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By KAREN WEINTRAUB   nytimes Photo A giant clam in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area. Credit Craig Cook/Undersea Medical In 2003, researchers declared Coral Castles dead. On the floor of a remote island lagoon halfway between Hawaii and Fiji, the giant reef site had been devastated by unusually warm water. Its remains looked like a pile of drab dinner plates tossed into the sea. Research dives in 2009 and 2012 had shown little improvement in the coral colonies. Then in 2015, a team of marine biologists was stunned and overjoyed to find Coral Castles, genus Acropora, once again teeming with life. But the rebound came with a big question: Could the enormous and presumably still fragile coral survive what would be the hottest year on record? This month, the Massachusetts-based research team finished...

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Earth Overshoot Day: August 8th Proved Our Planet Is Hurting Badly...

Aug 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   FUTURISM The Global Footprint Network says on August 8, our demands have exceeded what the Earth can offer and regenerate for the year. And if our consumption and carbon emissions continue at the rate we’re going, we’ll be needing two Earths to address our needs by the 2030’s. What’s Going On? August 8 marked the day that the Global Footprint Network says our annual demands would have exceeded what the Earth can regenerate in the year. They estimate humanity’s consumption of natural resources is equivalent to that of 1.6 Earths. If we continue at this rate of consumption and pollution, our needs will be equivalent to that of two Earths by the 2030s. Just a quick reminder: we only have one. “It is crucial to understand that the longer we continue consuming...

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Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (July 16 – 30)...

Aug 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  J.R. Taylor Photograph by Simon Norfolk / Institute for the New Yorker Are Seawalls the Best Answer to Rising Sea Levels – or is Retreat a Better Option? – The Guardian, 7/18/16 “The extraordinary pictures of subsumed gardens and a swimming pool wrenched from the ground by the giant waves that battered Sydney’s northern beaches last month have revived debate about seawalls and the impact of human attempts to keep the rising ocean from our doors.” Cleveland’s Great New Public Spaces Helped Make RNC 2016 a Success – The Cleveland Plain Dealer, 7/22/16 “The Republican National Convention, where Trump gave his acceptance speech Thursday night, was a great, crashing success for its host city – and especially for the revitalized public spaces that framed the event and made it possible.” The...

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BRAZILIANS USE OLYMPICS TO DELIVER CLIMATE MESSAGE...

Aug 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  Jared Green 2016 Rio Olympics Opening Ceremony / NBC The estimated 3.3 billion people who watched the opening ceremony of the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, saw a beautiful and compelling case for fighting climate change. Brazil, which is to critical to global efforts, given its stewardship of the Amazon rainforest, decided to use its big moment on the global stage to make the message clear: climate change will impact us all, and we must all do something, even if it’s simply planting a tree. In the beginning of the ceremony, the Amazon was depicted as the great web of life, a multi-layered network, which is really how a forest functions, according to biomimicry pioneer Janine Benyus (see image at top). We then see dancers from the indigenous tribes...

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Chemtrails are Greatest Threat to Life on Earth...

Aug 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Posted on August 7, 2016 Dane Wigington Last month, CIA Director John Brennan admitted Chemtrails, or as he put it, “Stratospheric Aerosol Injection,” is established geoengineering science used to fight global warming. Geoengineering researcher Dane Wigington says if the government is admitting it, the negative effects of spraying are too big to hide much longer. Wigington explains,  “When CIA Director Brennan has to address it publicly, clearly it’s getting very difficult for them to hide this elephant in the room and the damage it has done, not only to the environment, but to us. It is irreparable already, and they know the liability already. They know this. They also know the amount of liability that has been created. That’s why they have been so desperate to hide this. To put this into the...

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ARE WE LOOKING AT A MASS EXTINCTION EVENT...

Aug 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] If you or someone you know needs proof that global climate change is real and is happening before our very eyes, you could go to the “State of the Climate Report” put together by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). But just turning on the television or opening the newspaper these days should be enough to raise alarms. Over the weekend for instance, Ellicott City, just up the road in Maryland, was nearly washed away in a 1000-year flooding event similar to what recently happened in West Virginia. Across the world, more than 150 people were killed in floods in India and 1.1 million more Indians were displaced in flooding that wiped out large swatches of infrastructure and agricultural land. Out in the Western United States, firefighters north of Los Angeles were...

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New World Bank Policies Imperil Environment and Land Defenders...

Aug 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Cyril Mychalejko, teleSUR The World Bank approved Thursday its new “Environmental and Social Framework” which civil society groups say weakens human rights protections and will likely endanger the very communities the safeguards are intended to protect. At issue are a series of contradictions which strengthens the oversight authority of the very governments that are pushing the mammoth development projects typically opposed by poor, Indigenous and working class communities. The likely result, critics say, will be more conflicts and more corpses, doubling down, as it were, on 2015, a year which the environmental NGO Global Witness says was the deadliest recorded year for environmental defenders, with an average of three slayings per week, worldwide. This year already saw the March 3 high-profile assassination of Berta Caceres an Indigenous rights and land defender from Honduras who tirelessly campaigned against a widely...

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ABOUT FRACKOPOLY

Aug 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] FOOD AND WATER WATCH Learn more about Wenonah Hauter’s book, Frackopoly, which chronicles the rise of the fracking industry and the growing movement against fracking. Protect our drinking water from fracking. Don’t let Big Oil and Gas frack our public lands. “If Hauter had written this as a novel using the same characters, countries and global intrigue, it would quickly become an international bestseller and a miniseries would soon follow. She describes bigger-than-life captains of industry and colorful small-time scoundrels who play the system for their own gain. There are secret meetings and global conspiracies…a page turner.” — National Catholic Reporter A true tale of corruption and greed, Frackopoly: The Battle for the Future of Energy and the Environment exposes how more than 100 years of political influence peddling facilitated the control of our...

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Lawsuit Seeks To Keep Oil And Gas Drilling Out Of Protected California Aquifer...

Aug 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong A shut-down injection well sit next to an almond orchard in Bakersfield, Calif.   An environmental group is trying to stop a plan to expand drilling for oil and gas in protected California aquifers. The Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit Wednesday against California regulators, alleging they failed to properly consider the risks of injecting wastewater into an aquifer near San Luis Obispo, in Southern California. “It’s shocking that Gov. Jerry Brown’s oil regulators are supporting the oil industry’s efforts to get federal permission to dump waste into California’s protected aquifers,” attorney Maya Golden-Krasner said in a statement emailed to ThinkProgress. The underground aquifer — and dozens like it — are protected under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act, and the EPA...

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