Humanity’s Plunder of Nature’s Resources Is Intensifying...

Jul 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Alex Kirby / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG Landscape deeply scarred by an open-cut coal mine in Hunter Valley, Australia. (Max Phillips, Jeremy Buckingham MLC via Flickr) LONDON—Humans’ appetite for gnawing away at the fabric of the Earth itself is growing prodigiously. According to a new UN report, the amount of the planet’s natural resources extracted for human use has tripled in 40 years. A report produced by the International Resource Panel (IRP), part of the UN Environment Programme, says rising consumption driven by a growing middle class has seen resources extraction increase from 22 billion tonnes in 1970 to 70 billon tonnes in 2010. It refers to natural resources as primary materials, and includes under this heading biomass, fossil fuels, metal ores and non-metallic minerals. The increase in their use, the...

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Democratic Platform Calls For WWII-Scale Mobilization To Solve Climate Crisis...

Jul 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Mark Stehle/Invision for NRG/AP Images Micro-wind turbines and solar panels installed at Lincoln Financial Field generate renewable energy during NRG Home’s 2nd Annual Media Charity Flag Football Game in Philadelphia Wednesday, November 19, 2014.   This month, the full Democratic Platform Committee approved the strongest statement about the urgent need for climate action ever issued by a major party in this country. The platform makes for the starkest possible contrast with a party that just nominated Donald Trump — a man who has called climate change a hoax invented by and for the Chinese, who has denied basic reality such as the drought in California, and who has vowed to (try to) scuttle the unanimous agreement by the world’s nations in Paris to take whatever measures are...

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Droughts Dry Up Amazon’s ‘Green Lungs’...

Jul 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Tim Radford / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     A reduction of the Amazon rainforest’s canopy is contributing to climate change. (Phil Blackburn via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Researchers have confirmed once again that if the Amazon rainforest is one of the planet’s “green lungs”, it may be running short of breath. Repeated drought and tree loss mean that there is increasing risk that the forest may one day cease to be a “sink” for atmospheric carbon released by the combustion of fossil fuels. But even as climate scientists shake their heads in distress, plant taxonomists may be holding their heads in despair. They have just been told that so rich and various are the trees of the great Brazilian rainforest that another three centuries may...

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Greenpeace reports jump in radioactive contamination in Fukushima waterways...

Jul 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Greenpeace Japan member Mai Suzuki removes sediment samples from a remotely operated grabber at Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture on March 22. | © CHRISTIAN ÅSLUND / GREENPEACE National by Eric Johnston Staff Writer OSAKA – Greenpeace Japan on Thursday said it has discovered radioactive contamination in Fukushima’s riverbanks, estuaries and coastal waters at a scale hundreds of times higher than pre-2011 levels. One sample of sediment taken along the Niida River, less than 30 km northwest of the crippled Fukushima No. 1 power plant, revealed the presence of cesium-134 and cesium-137 at levels of 29,800 becquerels per kilogram. That was just one of 19 samples of dried sediment and soil the environmental activist group took and analyzed from the banks of the Abukuma, Niida, and Ota rivers. The samples were collected by...

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A New Study Adds Fuel to Calls for a Fracking Ban...

Jul 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] On the eve of the Democratic National Convention, researchers found that people living near fracking activity face a “significantly higher” risk of asthma attacks. By Zoë Carpenter THE NATION A fracking well in the Eagle Ford Shale region, near Karnes City, Texas. (AP Photo / Aaron M. Sprecher) About 386 million years ago, Pennsylvania received a great gift—or, depending on your point of view, a curse: the Marcellus Shale, a formation of black rock and limestone containing vast reserves of natural gas. The formation stretches from New York through the Appalachian Basin, but it’s Pennsylvania that has played host to the most intensive plundering of those reserves since the mid-2000s, when energy companies began to use hydraulic fracturing to free up the gas trapped a mile below the surface of the earth. Pennsylvania will...

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Microfiber Madness: Synthetic Fabrics Harm Wildlife, Poison the Food Supply and Expose You to Toxins...

Jul 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment With every wash, your synthetic fleece jacket releases microfibers that harm marine animals. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Colourful Textile fleece sport shirts hanging in row at store Photo Credit: dvoevnore/Shutterstock Doing laundry isn’t something most of us enjoy doing. And now the evidence is clear that the world’s aquatic animals don’t enjoy it either. It turns out that clothes made from synthetic fibers shed tiny plastic microfibers in every wash. This fibrous debris goes from your washing machine, through the municipal sewage system and ends up in all sorts of waterways—marine, coastal and freshwater—where the tiny fibers are ingested by fish, crabs and other aquatic wildlife. In turn, many of these animals end up in our food supply—and on our dinner plates. It seems we are slowly, and literally, eating the...

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Why one of the world’s best fossil sites is full of severed bird feet...

Jul 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Speaking of Science By Brian Switek WASHINGTON POST One of the isolated legs found in Germany. (Gerald Mayr) Prehistoric creatures aren’t exactly renowned for their table manners. Most dinosaurs, for example, were incapable of chewing and had to swallow their food whole. But some ancient eaters were messier than others. And in southwestern Germany, something especially sloppy left severed bird feet strewn about a dense fossil boneyard. The Messel Pit is one of the greatest fossil sites in the world. Within stacks of 47-million-year-old oil shale is an unmatched record of life in and around an ancient lake. There are early mammals preserved down to their fur, pairs of turtles that somehow died in the middle of mating, dozens of plant species and more than 1,000 bird skeletons. It’s the closest paleontologists can...

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How an Indigenous Community Is Boosting Crop Productivity While Conserving the Rainforest (Video)...

Jul 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment “We are reforesting and restoring the land so that our grandchildren and our children have a future.” By Laura Jamison / Rainforest Alliance   VIA ALTERNET naranjilla fruit Photo Credit: Rainforest Alliance In the Napo province of Ecuador, the Kichwa people have been cultivating naranjilla—a citrus fruit that looks like a tomato but tastes like a blend of lime and rhubarb—and selling it informally in markets across the country for many years. In fact, naranjilla production has been the primary cash crop for indigenous Kichwa communities in the Hatun Sumaco parish. Unfortunately, naranjilla has also been the primary driver of deforestation in the area—and thus directly contributing to climate change. Without direct access to markets, the Kichwa had traditionally sold their harvests to middlemen, who promoted dangerous quantities of highly toxic, red-listed pesticides...

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Commentary: Update of Toxic Substances Control Act a worthy step that’s long overdue...

Jul 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., center, joined by, from left, Sen. Edward J. Markey, D-Mass., Sen. David Vitter, R-La., Bonnie Lautenberg, widow of the late New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg, Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., and Sen. Shelley Moore Capito R-W. Va., talks about bipartisan legislation to improve the federal regulation of chemicals and toxic substances, Thursday, May 19, 2016. J. Scott Applewhite/AP In a groundbreaking report six years ago, a National Cancer Institute panel warned that it was time to pay closer attention to environmental causes of a disease that takes more than a half-million American lives each year. “[T]he true burden of environmentally induced cancer has been grossly underestimated,” the panelists wrote in their transmittal letter to President Obama in April 2010. “With nearly 80,000 chemicals on the market in the United States,...

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Did An Entire Region Of The U.S. Just Disincentivize Renewables? This Lawsuit Says Yes....

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock During the 2014 polar vortex, wind generation saved consumers $1 billion, according to industry estimates.   During the polar vortex of 2014, power companies struggled. There wasn’t enough natural gas power in the pipeline (pun intended), and prices skyrocketed. The shortage was expensive for homeowners — some saw their monthly bill go up five-fold from January to February — but for utilities, it was expensive, dangerous, and scary. No one wants to be on the hook for a bunch of families losing power in the middle of a -7°F night. Following the prolonged cold snap, PJM, the entity that oversees utilities in the Mid-Atlantic and parts of Appalachia and the Midwest, put a plan into action: It would help the local utilities ensure that power was...

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Oil Spills Are Actually Good For Birds, Fish, And The Economy According To The Oil Industry...

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling  CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Bill Haber   For the past few weeks, the Washington State Energy Facility Site Evaluation Council (EFSEC) has been holding hearings on the matter of a proposed oil-by-rail terminal that could be built in Vancouver, Washington. If approved, it would be the largest oil-by-rail facility in the country, handling some 360,000 barrels of crude oil, shipped by train, every single day. It would also greatly increase the number of oil trains that pass through Washington, adding a total of 155 trains, per week, to the state’s railroads. Environmentalists worry that an increase in oil trains could lead to an rise in oil train derailments, like the kind seen in early June when a Union Pacific train carrying Bakken crude derailed outside the Oregon town of Mosier,...

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Climate Change, Bats, And Zika: 2016’s Weirdest Relationship...

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha PageCLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock A worker fogs a residential neighborhood with insecticides to kill mosquitoes.   Particularly if you live in the Northeast, you might notice that it is really hot out. And buggy. Much of the United States has gotten a lot of rain this summer, too, providing breeding ground for mosquitoes. At some point, it’s expected that some of these mosquitoes could start carrying the Zika virus. Zika’s outbreak, which started last fall in Brazil, has caused at least three infants in the United States — and thousands across South and Central America — to be born with microencephaly, a defect characterized by incomplete growth of the head and brain, and which is linked to many health complications. Understandably, people are worried. The House of Representatives recently passed a...

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Fire From New Mexico Fracking Site Explosion Keeps Burning Three Days Later...

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Kendra Pinto   A massive fire at a fracking site in rural New Mexico that scorched 36 oil storage tanks and prompted the evacuation of 55 residents is dwindling but still burning Thursday, some three days after the first explosion was reported. The fire that started Monday night is mostly out, WPX Energy, the Oklahoma-based company that owns the site, reported Wednesday. However, “small fires” remained at four of the 36 tanks, the company said. No injuries have been reported and according to the company no drilling was taking place at the site prior to the storage tanks catching fire. On Thursday morning plumes of smoke continued to billow from the five-acre oil production site located near Nageezi, a Navajo Nation town some 135 miles northwest...

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A Burst of Federal Rulemaking May Help Millions of Animals...

Jul 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment The Obama Administration has pushed animal welfare ahead in a remarkable slew of rulemaking actions and policies. By Wayne Pacelle / The Humane Society of the United States   VIA ALTERNET Bengal Tiger in forest show head and leg Photo Credit: dangdumrong/Shutterstock The recent months have been big for animal protection. Walmart announced it would go cage-free for its egg purchases, and a number of other retailers did the same. “In a virtual tidal wave of announcements, nearly 100 retailers, restaurants, food manufacturers and food service companies have revealed cage-free plans in the last year,” writes Meat & Poultry magazine about The HSUS’s efforts, In April, our Humane Society International team helped to pass an anti-cruelty statute in El Salvador – this is the third country in Central America that we’ve persuaded to establish a legal standard against the practice. These are big gains in our campaign to start...

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WATCH: Bill Nye Answers the Looming Question About Juno...

Jul 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment Here is what powers NASA’s Juno spacecraft. By Alexandra Rosenmann / AlterNet   The launch of NASA’s Juno spacecraft naturally has astrophysicists and other science aficionados cheering. It also has a lot of people scratching their heads wondering how such wonders are possible. Bill Nye has the answers about how NASA’s Juno spacecraft, which arrived at Jupiter today, uses light from the sun to keep running. “Three solar rays take light and convert it directly into electricity,” Nye, the “science guy” explained. “A little motor is powered by a solar panel also. When we turn it to the light, the motor starts to run.” As you might expect, Nye added, moving farther from the source of light means “less and less electricity to drive the motor.” And the energy required to...

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The Developing World is Awash in Pesticides. Does It Have to Be?...

Jul 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Herbicides, insecticides and fungicides threaten the environment and human health in many parts of the world. But research is pointing to a better approach. By Aleszu Bajak BILL MOYERS & CO. Pesticides help developing countries produce more food — but also take a toll on human health and the environment. (Photo by Thomas Cristofoletti/USAID/Flickr cc 2.0) This post originally appeared at Ensia. In today’s globalized world, it is not inconceivable that one might drink coffee from Colombia in the morning, munch cashews from Vietnam for lunch and gobble grains from Ethiopia for dinner. That we can enjoy these products is thanks, in large part, to expanded pesticide use across the developing world. Every year, some 3.5 billion kilograms (7.7 billion pounds) of pesticides — a catch-all term for the herbicides, insecticides and...

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SAN FRANCISCO WILL BAN ALL POLYSTYRENE PRODUCTS BY 2017...

Jul 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] FUTURISM Chris Caravello/Flickr In Brief San Francisco will be the first major US city to ban the sale of polystyrene or styrofoam products. Next year, styrofoam will be a thing of the past in San Francisco. Local council has just unanimously voted to ban the sale of polystyrene products — also commonly called styrofoam — by 2017. Styrofoam insulation products won’t be covered by these new rules, but the sale of all polystyrene food packaging, packing peanuts, take-away containers, coffee cups, foam dock floatings, mooring buoys, and pool toys will be illegal after the clock strikes 12 on 1 January 2017. Image source: Science Alert This is a critical step towards San Francisco’s goal of being a waste-free city by 2020. Polystyrene is one of the most commonly used packing products, and 25 billion polystyrene...

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MIT CONFIRMS THE OZONE HOLE IS HEALING...

Jul 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Futurism M.A/NASA Goddard on YouTube In Brief Scientists from MIT confirm that the hole in the ozone layer above Antarctica has shrunken by about 4 million square kilometers. This proves that the worldwide boycott of CFCs is yielding positive results, seen almost 30 years after the Montreal Protocol of 1987. Protecting the Protector The Montreal Protocol of 1987 called upon the world to control the production and use of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) in order to protect the ozone layer—which is our very own protection from high levels of ultraviolet rays from the sun. Nearly 30 years after the whole world joined forces to address the threat brought about by the thinning ozone layer, scientists at MIT confirm that the hole over Antarctica is starting to heal. “We can now be confident that the...

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‘Guacamole-Thick’ Algae Takes Over Florida’s Atlantic Coast, 4 Counties Declare State of Emergency...

Jul 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment Residents have described the foul-smelling algae as “god-awful” and “a festering infected creepy mess.” By Lorraine Chow / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: instagram @ocean_allison Waterways and beaches along Florida’s Atlantic coast have been taken over by thick, blue-green algae blooms, prompting Florida Gov. Rick Scott to declare local states of emergency in St. Lucie, Martin, Palm Beach and Lee counties. Residents have described the foul-smelling algae as “guacamole-thick,” “god-awful” and “a festering infected creepy mess.” One resident has complained of health problems, telling Reuters, “It is affecting all of us as far as red eyes, runny nose and the ‘in the throat’ feeling.” Foul smelling green algae blooms have invaded Florida’s waterways. #green #algae #Florida #treasurecoast #algaebloom #treasurecoast A photo posted by Carbonated.TV (@carbonated.tv) on Jul 1, 2016 at 6:04am PDT “It’s heartbreaking...

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‘Water Windfall’ Found in Drought-Stricken California...

Jun 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment California’s Central Valley has three times more freshwater in underground aquifers than previously thought. By Bobby Magill / Climate Central  VIA ALTERNET California’s Central Valley has three times more freshwater in underground aquifers than previously thought, drinking water that could help the state weather future drought and fortify itself against a changing climate, according to a new Stanford University study. But tapping that water, locked thousands of feet beneath the ground, will be expensive and comes with an enormous risk — it could cause the valley floor to sink, according to the study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Sinking land in the Central Valley is threatening roads, homes and other infrastructure, and reduces the amount of water some aquifers can hold. California’s parched Central Valley in 2014. Credit: Stuart Rankin/NASA/flickr...

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SEE HOW THE SIERRA CLUB’S LEADER IS TROLLING REPUBLICANS...

Jun 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  GRIST Sierra Club By Rebecca Leber The head of the Sierra Club is having some fun trolling the GOP.The Republican National Committee reportedly can’t find enough willing speakers to fill time at its convention in Cleveland a few weeks away. Politicians like Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) have refused the spotlight because they think the party’s presidential nominee, Donald Trump, is toxic. So Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, emailed RNC chair Reince Priebus on Wednesday and generously offered to step in during the party’s time of need. “I heard that you are having trouble finding speakers for the Republican National Convention in Cleveland,” Brune writes in his email. “Don’t worry — I’m here to help. I’d be happy to take the stage at the Republican National Convention, and discuss the future of energy...

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4 WAYS TO REDUCE YOUR HOME’S ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT...

Jun 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Reducing your home’s environmental impact begins with reducing its carbon footprint. Your home’s carbon emissions as a result of your activities, or its carbon footprint, can be reduced by making environmentally sounder decisions, upgrading appliances and using less energy while taking advantage of what nature has to offer. Here are four way to reduce your home’s environmental impact. Take Advantage of Nature To avoid turning on lamps and lights around your house during the daytime, take advantage of natural light. To do this, avoid crowding furniture around your windows or glass doors to allow natural light into your home. Do keep your refrigerator out of the sun so it doesn’t have to use as much energy to keep itself cool. In regards to your home’s outdoor landscape, trees are great for protection from...

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HOLY CRAP … THE TREES ON YOUR BLOCK ARE WORTH HOW MUCH MONEY?!...

Jun 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Scientists just showed that money really does grow on trees. Clayton Aldern   MOTHER JONES Sheila Fitzgerald/Shutterstock This story originally appeared on Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. It’s not easy to price a tree, but a group of researchers from the US Forest Service and UC Davis have tried to do exactly that. Working with a dataset of about 900,000 trees that line California’s public streets, the group sought to place a dollar value on the services those trees perform, which include “energy savings, carbon storage, air pollutant uptake, and rainfall interception.” Trees lining California’s public streets contribute about $1 billion annually to the state’s economy—nearly $111 per tree. All told, the researchers estimate the trees contribute about $1 billion annually—nearly $111 per tree for each of the state’s 9.1 million street trees....

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IT’S REALLY HARD TO DEAL WITH CLIMATE CHANGE. A NEW PODCAST TALKS IT OUT....

Jun 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock Hot Mic By Grist staff A podcast about our warming planet from some of the nation’s best-known climate commentators? To quote the God of Mischief (patron deity of both Grist and teen girls): “Well, I guess that’s worth a look.” Or in this case, a listen. In the first episode of “Warm Regards,” meteorologist and Slate writer Eric Holthaus, paleoecologist Jacquelyn Gill, and New York Times columnist Andy Revkin talk about one of our favorite subjects here at Grist: how to talk about climate change. Holthaus starts out with the confession that he’s terrified by global warming, and his co-hosts chime in on how they, too, came to fear the carbon-pocalypse. But how do you discuss the problem in a way that inspires action instead of terror? Take a listen to find...

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PINK SNOW LOOKS AWESOME, BUT IS ANOTHER CLIMATE CHANGE INDICATOR...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] GREEN It’s caused by a red algae, and it’s bad news for the Arctic.     Lydia O’Connor  The Huffington Post    <!– TAG START { player: “Embed Player”, owner: “Embed Company”, for: “Embed” } –><div class=”vdb_player vdb_5688f66de4b040e17d9912265688f5c1e4b0f2c97f395156″ vdb_params=”m.refbcid=56000e19e4b0e4e194b84b31&m.refpid=5668ae6ee4b0b5e26955d6a6″><script type=”text/javascript” src=”//delivery.vidible.tv/jsonp/pid=5688f66de4b040e17d991226/vid=576bf81fe4b08ecd3806c18b/5688f5c1e4b0f2c97f395156.js”> Some call it pink snow, some call it watermelon snow — and now, a new study is calling it yet another symbol of the drastic melting in the Arctic. The appearance of the so-called pink snow, which Arctic explorers have observed for centuries, is the result of a red algae that likes to bloom in the frozen water. In a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications, researchers found that those algal blooms are causing the ice to melt faster, and the algae is likely to grow more rapidly as climate...

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THE NEW LANDSCAPE DECLARATION: PERSPECTIVE AND CRITIQUE (PART 2)...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Dirt Contributo New Landscape Declaration / LAF The second day of the Landscape Architecture Foundation‘s New Landscape Declaration:  Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future offered critical responses to the 23 declarations delivered on the first day of the event and looked ahead to the next 50 years. Afternoon sessions were divided into five panels, each representing a different aspect of landscape architecture: academic practice, private practice, public practice, capacity building organizations, and emerging voices. Each panelist gave a short talk before engaging in a group discussion, addressing audience-sourced questions, and offering perspectives on what needs to be achieved over the next 50 years: Academic practice: Maintain the value of the “long view” “Academics combine teaching, scholarship, and service” while “taking the long view: looking back, then to now, and forward,” argued...

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THOUSANDS OF CITIES FROM SIX CONTINENTS JUST AGREED TO WORK ON CLIMATE CHANGE...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Stephane de Sakutin/Pool Photo via AP   Thousands of cities from six continents united Wednesday to create the largest global coalition committed to battling human-caused climate change and pushing the world into a low-carbon economy. The Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy unifies 7,100 cities encompassing more than half a billion people, the group said in a statement. Created some six months after the Paris accord, this global alliance aims for greater collaboration between cities and increased funding to support sustainable energy development. As more than half the world’s population lives in urban areas, cities are now major generators of greenhouse gas emissions. About 75 percent of global CO2 emissions come from cities, and most of those emissions are attributed to transportation and...

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THE MAJORITY OF WEST VIRGINIA IS UNDER A STATE OF EMERGENCY AFTER FLOODS DEVASTATE THE STATE...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Justin Michaels/The Weather Channel Flooding in White Sulfur Springs, WV. Forty-four of West Virginia’s 55 counties are under a state of emergency as severe weather and devastating floods have killed at least 14 residents and left hundreds of thousands without power. A spokesperson for West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin told ABC News that the floods, in some areas, had the potential to be “the worst in 100 years.” Severe rain and thunderstorms battered West Virginia for most of Thursday, leaving some parts of the state inaccessible due to damaged roads and infrastructure. At least four residents have died as a result of the floods, including an eight-year old boy who was swept away by flash flooding. A second toddler, between two and four years old,...

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Lawsuit Reveals Extent of DuPont’s Decades-Long Cover Up Behind Cancer-Causing Teflon Chemical...

Jun 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Chemical giant DuPont is in court defending their decision to poison entire communities by releasing a toxic chemical known as C8 into the Ohio River. By Farron Cousins / DeSmogBlog  VIA ALTERNET DECEMBER 2013 – BERLIN: the logo of the brand “Du Pont”. Photo Credit: 360b/Shutterstock Corporate heavyweight DuPont is back in court right now, defending their decision to poison entire communities along the Ohio River by releasing a toxic chemical known as C8 into the river. C8 is a chemical that is used in the manufacturing of the company’s blockbuster product Teflon. The case alleges that DuPont officials were intimately aware of the dangerous side effects of C8 exposure but still decided to allow exposure among workers and by releasing the chemical into the environment. Once the chemicals were dumped into the Ohio River,...

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CLIMATE CHANGE, FOSSIL FUELS ARE HURTING OUR KIDS...

Jun 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Children under 5 bear the brunt of disease and problems from climate change and fossil-fuel combustion. It’s time to do something about it. By Frederica Perera | BILL MOYERS.COM A child in an area affected by a drought in the southern outskirts of Tegucigalpa on April 22, 2016. (Photo by Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images) This post originally appeared at Environmental Health News. Editor’s note: The following opinion piece written for EHN accompanies Perera’s commentary on fossil fuels and children’s health published June 21 in the Environmental Health Perspectives journal.  Children suffer the most from fossil-fuel burning. Fossil-fuel combustion and associated air pollution and carbon dioxide (CO2) is the root cause of much of children’s ill health today, as well as their uncertain future. There are strong scientific arguments, as well persuasive economic ones,...

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