NUCLEAR WASTE LEAKING AT ‘AMERICAN FUKUSHIMA’ IN NORTHWEST U.S....

May 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Alexander Nazaryan NEWSWEEK U.S. Radioactive Material Washington The Hanford Nuclear Reservation sits on the plains of eastern Washington, where the state meets Oregon and Idaho. This is open country through which cars pass quickly on the way to the Pacific coast or, conversely, deeper into the heartland. The site is nearly 600 square miles in area and has been largely closed to the public for the past 70 years. Late last year, though, it became part of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park, which will allow visitors to tour B Reactor, where plutonium for one of the two atomic weapons dropped on Japan in World War II was produced. This was a hopeful turn for a place that, for four decades, stocked the American nuclear arsenal. A total of nine reactors operated at...

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WHY BILL GATES’ MATH ERROR ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE MATTERS...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm  CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/John Peterson Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates plays table tennis against prodigy Ariel Hsing, unseen, along with Berkshire Hathaway Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett, unseen, outside the Borsheims jewelry store, a Berkshire Hathaway subsidiary, in Omaha, Neb., Sunday, May 1, 2016.   Bill Gates keeps saying confused and confusing things about climate policy and clean energy. Gates has positioned himself as a major player and spokesman in this arena with his “Breakthrough Energy Coalition,” a $2 billion effort he is spearheading to research and develop breakthrough “energy miracles.” That means his confused — and often simply wrong — pronouncements could have serious consequences in the public debate and are worth exploring in detail. Gates’ latest bizarre position, as one media headline explained, is to dismiss a carbon...

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RESEARCHERS ACCIDENTALLY DISCOVER A WAY TO MAKE BATTERIES LAST BASICALLY FOREVER...

May 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] INHABITAT by Cat DiStasio View Slideshow Inventors joke about building “a better mousetrap,” but these days, it’s a better battery that everyone actually wants. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine have made a breakthrough that could lead to just that. Using gold and some new-fangled materials, the team built a nanowire battery that maintains its performance after hundreds of thousands of charging cycles. Compared to existing lithium-ion battery technology, this could shift the future of energy storage forever – and the whole thing was discovered on accident. Rechargeable lithium ion batteries slip in performance over time, after being charged and recharged hundreds of times. This is why a brand new cell phone battery will last all day, but after a year, you’re lucky to get through the day without dipping into the...

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THIS MASSIVE SEAGRASS DIE-OFF IS THE LATEST SIGN WE’RE FAILING TO PROTECT THE EVERGLADES...

May 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE WASHINGTON POST Energy and Environment By Chris Mooney A massive die off of vital seagrass threatens Florida Bay Play Video2:20 A massive die off of seagrass threatens a resource critically important to the ecology and economy of South Florida. (Photo by Angel Valentin) (Daron Taylor/The Washington Post) EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK, Florida — The shallow coastal waters of Florida Bay are famed for their crystal clear views of thick green seagrass – part of the largest stretch of these grasses in the world. But since mid-2015, a massive 40,000-acre die off here has clouded waters and at times coated shores with floating dead grasses. The event, which has coincided with occasional fish kills, recalls a prior die-off from 1987 through the early 1990s, which spurred major momentum for the still incomplete task of...

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HOW TO TALK TO YOUR FRIENDS ABOUT THE PARIS AGREEMENT...

Apr 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE CLIMATE REALITY PROJECT You don’t have to be a policy wonk to understand what’s happening with the Paris Agreement. When a record-breaking 175 nations attended the UN ceremony on April 22 to sign the Paris Agreement, Earth Day 2016 officially became one for the history books. But with a whole bunch of technical and official-sounding terms flying around, it’s not always immediately clear what exactly is happening or why. Here’s how to answer common questions your friends – on the internet or IRL – are probably asking about what’s going on. 1. In one sentence – what’s the big deal? On April 22 – Earth Day – the Paris Agreement became one step closer to having legal effect around the world, as the 195 countries that adopted the agreement in December began...

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ONE MILLION POINTS OF LIGHT: TOP FIVE REASONS WE LOVE SOLAR...

Apr 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] GLOBAL PANORAMA Find out what the one-millionth solar installation in the US means for the future of renewable energy. Today, the future of solar energy is looking especially bright. That’s because the US reached a renewable energy milestone recently when the one-millionth solar installation came online.To help celebrate this new record, we’ve joined the #MillionSolarStrong campaign with our friends at the Solar Energy Industries Association. #MillionSolarStrong is not just a celebration of the progress the world has made in advancing solar energy, but also a look into a future built on clean, renewable energy where every day, we’re one step closer to putting an end to climate change. In this post, we’re celebrating this remarkable moment in solar and counting down the top five reasons we love solar energy. 5. Solar is booming. Consider...

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TOP SIX GREEN ENERGY GOOD NEWS STORIES FROM PARIS COP21...

Apr 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Juan Cole  TRUTHDIG This post originally ran on Truthdig contributor Juan Cole’s website.World leaders signed the COP21 Paris climate accord on Friday, Earth Day.  Whether it will be meaningful in stopping carbon dioxide emissions and emissions of other dangerous greenhouse gases that are warming our planet remains to be seen.  But there is some good news on the emissions front, and new renewable energy installations are key to it. 1.  The world’s production of carbon dioxide remained flat at 32.1 billion metric tons per annum for the second year in a row.  In the past 25 years it has been rare for emissions not to grow, except in years of severe economic downturn such as 2009.  In 2012 and 2013 emissions grew by 4% a year.  But in 2014 they grew...

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THE BIGGEST ONGOING DISASTER IN THE UNITED STATE YOU HAVEN’T HEARD OF...

Apr 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Scout Finch  DAILY KOS Blog Stream Groups  By Jen Hayden Incredible video of a sinkhole, located south of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, swallowing whole trees: Tim Murphy at Mother Jones described the sinkhole at Bayou Corne as “the biggest ongoing disaster in the United States you haven’t heard of.” One night in August 2012, after months of unexplained seismic activity and mysterious bubbling on the bayou, a sinkhole opened up on a plot of land leased by the petrochemical company Texas Brine, forcing an immediate evacuation of Bayou Corne’s 350 residents—an exodus that still has no end in sight. Last week, Louisiana filed a lawsuit against the company and the principal landowner, Occidental Chemical Corporation, for damages stemming from the cavern collapse.Texas Brine’s operation sits atop a three-mile-wide, mile-plus-deep salt deposit known as the...

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TRAMPLING SCIENCE TO BOOST NUCLEAR POWER...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Jim Naureckas   FAIR When the Washington Post and New York Times are making the same corporate-friendly point, it’s safe to assume that some PR agency somewhere is earning its substantial fees. In this case, the subject is the need for nuclear power—and, for the Post editorial board (4/18/16), for fracking as well. Standing in the way of this in the Post’s version is favorite target Bernie Sanders, while the Times business columnist Eduardo Porter (4/19/16)  blames the “scientific phobias and taboos” of “progressive environmentalists.” Washington Post (4/18/16) “While campaigning in New York, Mr. Sanders has played up his opposition to nuclear power,” the Post editorialists wrote, citing his contention that the Indian River nuclear plant, 25 miles from Manhattan, is a “catastrophe waiting to happen.” Sanders’ “criticism came as little surprise,” the...

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NUCLEAR POWER COSTS ENTER UNCHARTERED TERRITORY...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Paul Brown / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Many international businesses are hoping to cash in on disposal of nuclear waste. (StefrogZ via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—If you want a job for life, go into the nuclear industry—not building power plants, but taking them down and making them safe, along with highly-radioactive spent fuel and other hazardous waste involved. The market for decommissioning nuclear sites is unbelievably large. Sixteen nations in Europe alone face a €253 billion waste bill, and the continent has only just begun to tackle the problem. Among the many difficulties the industry faces is lack of trained people to do the highly-paid work. Anyone who enters the business is likely to be sought after for the rest of their...

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FOREIGN AFFAIRS SAYS SLASHING C02 QUICKLY REQUIRES NON-EXISTENT TECHNOLOGIES...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: By Koza1983 via Wikipedia Aerial photo of Spanish solar power towers.   Foreign Affairs has run one of the most confused, out-of-date and error-riddled pieces ever seen on clean energy and climate change. I will fact check it here, since the editors apparently didn’t. Despite the title, “The Clean Energy Revolution: Fighting Climate Change With Innovation,” it’s not about how the clean energy revolution of the last several years has been a game-changer for near-term climate action. Quite the reverse: It’s mostly an outdated rehashing of the oddly pessimistic “We need an energy miracle” myth, which has been debunked here and elsewhere so many times I’ve lost count. Bloomberg New Energy Finance: The “energy miracle” has arrived Indeed, earlier this month, Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF)...

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FINDING HOPE IN DESPAIR: WHAT I LEARNED HIKING THE ENTIRE KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE...

Apr 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Books We’re at the point when we’re supposed to act, but signing another online petition, changing to a more efficient lightbulb and joining a march doesn’t feel like enough. By Ken Ilgunas / Penguin Group (USA)  VIA ALTERNET The following is an excerpt from the new book Trespassing Across America by Ken Ilgunas (Blue Rider Press, 2016):  I was headed to the Pipeline Crossroads of the World: Cushing, Oklahoma. Cushing is the southern terminus of the 2010 Keystone Pipeline. If the Keystone XL is approved, oil will be piped by a shorter route from Hardisty, Alberta, to Cushing. A second part of the Keystone XL would be built from Cushing to the Gulf Coast refineries in Texas. I’d been paralleling the pipeline by walking on roads for the past two hundred miles, only occasionally walking the...

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REVERSE PHOTOSYNTHESIS IS AN ULTRA-EFFICIENT BIOFUEL “GAME CHANGER”...

Apr 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The ongoing quest for renewable energy takes a lot of cues from nature, and here’s one more. A team of scientists from Denmark’s University of Copenhagen has developed a “reverse photosynthesis” process that turns biomass into fuel using the sun’s energy. It’s essentially the opposite of what plants do by converting sunlight into chemical energy – and it could lead to new industrialized forms of clean energy that give fossil fuels a run for their money. < Biomass, typically in the form of straw or wood, can be converted to fuel through a variety of processes, but many are complicated, expensive, or have some unwanted side effects. The reverse photosynthesis process developed at the Copenhagen Plant Science Center is much cleaner, thanks to nature’s simplicity. An enzyme called lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase is added...

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BURNING ISSUES: WHEN FRACKING GOES GLOBAL...

Apr 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] AMERICANS FOR A SAFE FUTURE Burning Issues Video Hydraulic fracturing – “fracking” – to extract oil and gas deposits deep underground is rapidly becoming a global concern, says Jesse Coleman, a research investigator for Greenpeace, in this Burning Issues video segment. The globalization of what has been a United States environmental issue intensifies the global warming crisis, Coleman explains, and undermines the deployment of renewable energy in developing countries. Nonetheless, the United States government is supporting U.S. oil companies as they engage in fracking in other countries. Coleman reviews the positions of the presidential candidates. On the Democratic side, Coleman explains that while Hillary Clinton favors regulating future fracking activities, Bernie Sanders supports banning fracking altogether because of its global warming and environmental...

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FORTY PERCENT OF U.S. ELECTRICITY COULD COME FROM ROOFTOP SOLAR...

Apr 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By s.e. smith, Care2 | Report With rooftop solar arrays becoming more common, the Department of Energy decided to do some exploring to quantify exactly how much energy Americans could generate if they installed photovoltaic systems efficiently and extensively. What they found was startling: The country could meet 39 percent of its energy needs through rooftop photovoltaics, and, surprisingly, small structures like private homes are likely to return the best results. In a country still struggling for energy independence and looking for ways to reduce its carbon footprint, this is big news. The next step is to make it happen. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory took a look at data from 128 cities — accounting for almost a quarter of the buildings in the U.S. — and evaluated them for solar...

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AS FRACKING CHEMICALS REACH A CREEK COMPANIES FIGHT AGAINST A FRACKING WASTE BAN...

Apr 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] CREDIT: Bill Dickinson/Flickr View of the New River bridge in Fayette County, West Virginia. A tributary of the New River has traces of endocrine disrupting chemicals associated with fracking, according to a new study. Researchers discovered the chemicals near a fracking fluid waste site. The New River is a local water source.   The smell of gas surrounding the northern streets of Lochgelly, West Virginia, was so pungent that Brad Keenan could taste it as he was driving home with his windows up that evening in 2004. He called 911 and the gas company, thinking a punctured gas line was to blame, but the smell and the evacuation it prompted came from something few knew existed in town: fracking waste. “I had no idea what was going on,” said Keenan, 54, who by...

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WHY WORLD LEADERS ARE TERRIFIED OF WATER SHORTAGES...

Apr 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] From Yemen to Syria to Arizona, droughts are a growing threat. —By Nathan Halverson MOTHER JONES WVillagers ride donkeys to get water in Yemen in 2012. Yemen is one of the most arid countries in the world and relies almost exclusively on groundwater and rainfall for its water supply. Mohammed Mohammed/Xinhua/ZUMA This story was originally published by Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Subscribe to the podcast and learn more at revealnews.org. Secret conversations between American diplomats show how a growing water crisis in the Middle East destabilized the region, helping spark civil wars in Syria and Yemen, and how those water shortages are spreading to the United States. Classified US cables reviewed by Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting...

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OIL INDUSTRY’S SUPPRESSION OF CLIMATE SCIENCE BEGAN IN 1940’S, DOCUMENTS REVEAL...

Apr 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Nadia Prupis / Common Dreams   VIA TRUTHDIG Tim J Keegan / CC BY 2.0 A trove of newly uncovered documents shows that fossil fuel companies were explicitly warned of the risks of climate change decades earlier than previously suspected. And while it’s no secret—anymore—that the companies knew about those dangers long ago, the documents, published Wednesday by the Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), reveal even more about the broader industry effort to suppress climate science and foment public doubt about global warming. Industry executives met in Los Angeles in 1946 to discuss growing public concern about air pollution. That meeting led to the formation of a panel—suitably named the Smoke and Fumes Committee—to conduct research into air pollution issues. But the research was not meant to be a public service;...

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CALTECH’S 2500 ORBITING SOLAR PANELS COULD PROVIDE EARTH WITH LIMITLESS ENERGY...

Apr 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] FUTURISM NASA In Brief The Space Solar Power Initiative (SSPI), a collaboration between Caltech and Northrup Grumman, has developed a system of lightweight solar power tiles which can convert solar energy to radio waves and can be placed in orbit to beam power to an energy-thirsty Earth. Soaking in the Sun’s Rays One of the greatest challenges facing the 21st Century is the issue of power—how to generate enough of it, how to manufacture it cheaply and with the least amount of harmful side-effects, and how to get it to users. The solutions will have to be very creative—rather like what the Space Solar Power Initiative (SSPI), a partnership between Caltech and Northrup Grumman, has devised. Prototype of the “multifunctional tile.” Credit: Caltech “What we’re proposing, somewhat audaciously, is to develop the technology...

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The ‘Careful, Thoughtful’ Approach to Indian Point Is to Close It...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Federal agencies have found New York’s twin reactors to be high-risk for earthquakes and terrorist attacks. But like her evolving view on fracking, Clinton’s response is deliberately restrained. By Paul Gallay / Huffington Post   via ALTERNET Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant, Hudson River, New York Photo Credit: mandritoiu/Shutterstock In 2007, when Hillary Clinton was New York’s junior senator, she sagely observed that a “steady drumbeat of problems has eroded public confidence in Indian Point,” the twin-reactor nuclear power plant just outside New York City. In the time since Clinton left New York to become Secretary of State, Indian Point has become far more dangerous and the supply of energy available to replace it has grown sufficiently to enable its safe and affordable closure. Against this backdrop, when Secretary Clinton was asked recently what to...

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WHILE THEY WERE SHOUTING — A BOTANIST’S LAMENT ABOUT PRESIDENTIAL POLITICS...

Apr 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  By Andrew C. Revkin   Photo Clockwise from top left, Donald J. Trump, Hillary Clinton, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Senator Ted Cruz of Texas during campaign events.Credit Left, Eric Thayer for The New York Times; Top right, Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times; Bottom right, Max Whittaker for The New York Times Peter H. Raven, a lifelong prober and defender of biological diversity and president emeritus of the Missouri Botanical Garden, just distributed a note placing this year’s surreally unpredictable presidential race (watch in virtual “surreality” here) in the broader context of consequential environmental and social trends that perpetually seem to hide in plain sight. He starts with a retro-feeling reflection by Adlai Stevenson and then links to an essay he just wrote for Environmental Health News, which is reposted here:...

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UK’S FIRST SOLAR-POWERED GLAZED BUS SHELTER GENERATES ENOUGH ELECTRICITY TO POWER A LONDON HOME...

Apr 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT London has just taken another big step towards a solar-powered future. Today technology company Polysolar and the Canary Wharf Group unveiled the UK’s first transparent solar bus shelter with a ceremony officiated by Green Party candidate Sian Berry. Clad in innovative and transparent photovoltaic glass, the solar bus shelter is capable of generating 2,000 kW-hours per year—equivalent to the amount of electricity needed to power the average London home. Designed by Polysolar in collaboration with hard landscaping and street furniture supplier Marshalls, the Canary Wharf solar bus shelter proves that urban infrastructure can be functional, beautiful, and innovative. The modern and minimalist metal-framed shelter is topped by a butterfly roof to effectively shed rainwater and prevent runoff from spilling onto the heads of transit riders. Related: Solar Powered Bus...

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HALF OS U.S. OIL IS NOW FRACKED — BUT IT MIGHT NOT STAY THAT WAY...

Apr 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Simon Fraser University By Melissa Cronin  GRIST The U.S. has quickly become a global fracking powerhouse, and it’s not slowing down. According to a March report from the Energy Information Administration, hydraulic fracturing now accounts for more than half of all U.S. oil output per day, compared with 2 percent in 2000. America’s 300,000 fracking wells pumped out 4.3 million barrels per day in 2015 — a staggering figure when compared to the 102,000 barrels a day in 2000. That growth has allowed the U.S. to “increase its oil production faster than at any time in its history,” the report notes, and places it third in the world for oil production, trailing only behind Saudi Arabia and Russia.   But fracking, a process that involves injecting a chemical cocktail into deep underground reserves of shale deposits to extract oil and gas — isn’t without its dark side. It risks water contamination and its...

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OIL LEAK FROM KEYSTONE PIPELINE 89 TIMES WORSE THAN ORIGINALLY THOUGHT...

Apr 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Nati Harnik   Nearly a week after pipeline operator TransCanada shut down a section of its Keystone line over an oil leak, the company reported Thursday thousands of gallons of oil were spilled, not less than 200 as it first said. Based on soil excavations, TransCanada said about 16,800 gallons of oil leaked onto a field in South Dakota, the Associated Press reported. After the leak was discovered Saturday and the line was shut, TransCanada said about 187 gallons of crude oil had spilled, an accident that environmental groups said shows the dangers of shipping oil by pipeline. Though the spill is larger than first thought, it poses no significant environmental effects or threats to public safety, the AP said. However, Keystone transports Canadian tar...

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WHY RURAL ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES ARE OPTING FOR COMMUNITY-SCALE SOLAR...

Apr 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE This is the third in a series of blog posts on RMI’s Shine program. Shine is innovating and unlocking the community-scale market. Download the insight brief.  Rural electric cooperatives (co-ops) are a large and important part of the U.S. electricity landscape. Across the U.S., 840 distribution cooperatives and 65 generation and transmission cooperatives (G&Ts) serve an estimated 42 million people. Altogether co-ops provide 12 percent of the nation’s electricity and serve nearly 80 percent of U.S. counties. These co-ops are governed by 7 cooperative principles. Principle number 6 is cooperation among cooperatives. That means that when one co-op has a successful idea they spread the word and other co-ops opt-in.  Source: National Rural Electric Cooperative Association The successful idea of the moment is community-scale solar. Rural electric cooperatives are spreading...

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CANTAROW AND LEVY, COULD NUCLEAR DISASTER COME TO AMERICA?...

Apr 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] On March 11, 2011, following a massive earthquake and a devastating tsunami, the cores of three of the reactors at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant melted down with horrific results.  Radioactive cesium, with a half-life of 30 years, contaminated almost 12,000 square miles of the country, an area about the size of the state of Connecticut. The government considered 12.5 square miles around the plant so poisoned that its population was evacuated and it was declared a permanent “exclusion” zone. (At Chernobyl in Ukraine, three decades after the other great nuclear disaster of our era, a 1,000 square mile exclusion zone is still in place.)  One hundred and twenty thousand evacuees, some from areas outside the exclusion zone, have still not gone home and some undoubtedly never will, despite a vast decontamination program run...

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THE ICY FIRE BENEATH NORWAY’S SEABED...

Apr 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] HUFFINGTON POST   Randall Hyman Arctic Deeply Randall Hyman Marine biologist Peter Linke, GEOMAR engineers and deckhands guide a specially-designed lander (commissioned by Norway’s Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate (CAGE)) over the edge of RV Helmer Hanssen to begin a one-year seafloor mission monitoring marine methane off west coast of Spitsbergen, Svalbard archipelago, Norway. Trapped by deep ocean pressure and cold temperatures along continental shelves, methane hydrates could be an energy windfall or a looming disaster. Norway is spending millions to discover whether this ice-like form of natural gas will prove boon or bane. The landers lashed to the aft deck of the R/V Helmer Hanssen held firm as waves crashed into the ship. The two golf-cart-sized crafts, stocked with scientific instruments, appeared ready for planetary exploration, but in a...

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SEISMIC REPORT LINKS EARTHQUAKES TO FRACKING...

Apr 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment A new report from the U.S. Geological Survey reveals what’s really behind an alarming increase in earthquakes. By Adam Klasfeld / Courthouse News  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Calin Tatu Officially linking a controversial natural gas-drilling method to earthquakes for the first time, the U.S. Geological Survey released a groundbreaking report documenting links between fracking and skyrocketing seismic activity. Released on Monday, the agency’s “2016 One-Year Seismic Hazard Forecast” contains no explicit reference to hydraulic fracturing, but the allusion to the process is unmistakable. “Earthquake rates have recently increased markedly in multiple areas of the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS), especially since 2010, and scientific studies have linked the majority of this increased activity to wastewater injection in deep disposal wells,” the 58-page report states. “Such changes have caused concern to many, including...

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STATE AGS VOW TO TACKLE CLIMATE CHANGE AND FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY FRAUD...

Mar 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Mary Altaffer New York Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman speaks during a news conference, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016, in New York.   A group of state attorneys general just declared war on big polluters. The group, representing 17 states, said it will pursue climate change litigation. Massachusetts and the U.S. Virgin Islands officially joined an ongoing investigation into potential fraud by ExxonMobil, and all the states committed to working together as “creatively, collaboratively, and aggressively” as possible to combat climate change. “We have heard the scientists; we know what is being done to the planet,” New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said at a press conference Tuesday in Manhattan. The group also came together to defend the EPA’s Clean Power Plan, formally filing its petition in...

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