GREENS BASH HEADS OVER HOW TO DEAL WITH WILDFIRES...

Jan 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Katie Herzog GRIST There’s little doubt that wildfires are getting bigger, badder, and more damaging across the globe, but the question of how to deal with them is dividing environmentalists. According to most calculations, 2015 was a record-setting year for wildfires in the U.S. By the end, more than 10 million acres had burned across the country. Many of these were in the Western states, where hellish, otherworldly burns took over in normally temperate states like Washington and Alaska. In Boise, Idaho, a 100-foot-tall “firenado” sprouted from a blaze. California alone experienced more than 6,300 wildfires. The U.S. Forest Service recently named last year’s fire season as the worst in history. But this, according to some environmentalists, was a mistake — and one that’s only going to make the problem worse. The response to wildfires is generally to fight them: 1,200...

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THE SEVEN CHARTS YOU NEED TO FATHOM CALIFORNIA’S WATER PROSPECTS...

Jan 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Nathanael Johnson   GRIST It’s finally raining in California — just when we’d begun to think that it would never rain again. But the state is deep in water debt. Traditionally, California has depended on snowmelt for about a third of its water. The recent storms have gotten California’s snowpack up to slightly above average for this time of year, but it’s going to take a lot more than that to refill reservoirs. First the good news: Snow! Compare the current snowpack (above) to this time last year. Why are we seeing more snow? Well, it got colder and wetter. Last year, average minimum temperature in the Sierra Nevada mountains was 32.1 degrees, which meant it just wasn’t cold enough to snow in most places. “Temperatures are getting warmer every year,” said Doug Carlson, an information officer...

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HERE’S WHAT A YEAR OF GREEN ADVICE BOILS DOWN TO...

Dec 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Grist / Shutterstock Auld Lang Sign-off By Ask Umbra Dearest Readers, The champagne is chilling. The ball is hoisted and in position for a midnight drop. The shiny hats and noisemakers are lined up, ready to party. But before we get too busy ringing in 2016, I always like to look back on the year that was. In my role as mistress of the Ask Umbra inbox, I get a unique peek into the concerns, fears, and everyday hassles that fill your lives, dear readers. And in looking back over your letters, I can begin to see some themes emerge. Here’s what consumed you most in 2015 — from major water woes in California to just where we should be peeing. 2015: When drought questions showed no sign of drying up If one...

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SOUTH AFRICAN INSURANCE COMPANY BACKS TREE-PLANTING EFFORT TO REDUCE EFFECTS OF DROUGHT...

Dec 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Insurance companies are typically a fairly passive partner in disaster, showing up only when things have gone horribly wrong. The largest agricultural insurer in South Africa has broken the mold by backing a massive effort to slow the effects of drought, which threatens farmlands in the small country. Planting millions of trees has helped to reduce land degradation and ward off desertification, and the initiative could even lead to increased water supplies in communities that have lived under water restrictions for nearly a decade.  Rather than sit idly by and watch farmers lose untold acreage of croplands, Santam is working to actively reduce drought risk for its customers by funding Living Lands, an international nonprofit that has been active in South Africa since 2008. Working with government agencies, community organizations, and individual farmers,...

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INTERVIEW WITH CHRISTINE TEN EYCK ON THE BEAUTY OF DROUGHT...

Dec 19, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green Christine Ten Eyck, FASLA, is founder and principal of Ten Eyck Landscape Architects, Inc. Her firm of 12 has won numerous national ASLA awards. Interview conducted at the ASLA 2015 Annual Meeting in Chicago. Texas seems to be just coming out of a severe four-year drought. What has the drought taught Texas about water management? The drought has taught Texas they don’t have enough water for all the people and for growing agriculture. Texas wants to attract more people and industry. But if you attract more people, you’ve got to have water. Texas’s solution is to fund more infrastructure projects that bring water to the people — the Texas Rainy Day Fund, which has $2 billion for water management projects. They will give low interest rate loans to...

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CHINA’S “SPONGE CITIES” USE SMART INFRASTRUCTURE TO PREVENT MASSIVE WATER ISSUES...

Dec 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Kate Yoder   GRIST Of China’s many green fascinations (Exhibit A: Sproutcore), here’s one that seems like it’s actually going to change the country for the better: “sponge cities.” Nope, a sponge city isn’t a metropolis built from retired dishwashing sponges. Nor is it Bikini Bottom, that underwater hometown of one SpongeBob SquarePants. It’s a city built around the urban design concept of managing water in a ecologically sensible way. China’s natural ponds, rivers, and wetlands have been overwritten by a system of dams, levees, and tunnels that often can’t withstand the forces of nature. As a result of rapid urbanization and a whole lot of impermeable concrete (China used more cement from 2011 through 2013 than the U.S. did during the entire 20th century), the country is seeing more floods — and more serious ones — more...

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RECORD HEAT PUTS AUSTRALIA AT RISK OF INTENSE FIRE SEASON...

Nov 21, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By MICHELLE INNIS  NYTIMES Photo A fire east of Esperance in Western Australia this week. A prolonged fire season could strain the largely volunteer firefighting forces in Australia and destroy crops, livestock and farms. Credit Department of Fire and Emergency/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images   SYDNEY, Australia — A fire that raged this week across hundreds of thousands of acres of grasslands and about-to-be harvested wheat crops, killing a farmer and three workers, points to a dangerous summer ahead in Australia, scientists and weather watchers say. From Our Advertisers The fire, in the south of Western Australia, began last weekend after lightning struck about 12 miles north of the township of Esperance. It was flaring six days later after burning through 580 square miles of farmland, fanned by temperatures above 100 degrees and...

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Buckle Up: Scientists Warn of Dozens of Global Warming Tipping Points That Could Trigger Natural Disasters...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Rising surface temperatures due to climate change could ultimately rearrange the planet’s ecosystems. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: sakepaint/Shutterstock.com Rising surface temperatures due to climate change could have grave consequences for human life. An international group of scientists has pinpointed 41 specific places around the globe where abrupt temperature changes could trigger natural disasters affecting ocean currents, sea ice, snow cover, tundra permafrost and terrestrial biosphere. The scientists cite environmental neglect and over-exploitation of the Earth’s resources as the main contributing factors. These “global warming tipping points” include regions that host critical elements of Earth’s planetary system, such as the Amazon forest and the Tibetan plateau. While none of the areas implicated in the study are located near any major cities, the potential impact to the planet could still be grave,...

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NET ZERO INHOUSE BOASTS WATER-SMART SOLUTIONS ESSENTIAL FOR PARCHED CALIFORNIA...

Oct 11, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Architecture by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT Stories of drought-stricken California have become sadly common, with many citizens forced to slash their water use so severely they’ve let their gardens die. Luckily, innovative architecture is proving that a water-conscious lifestyle doesn’t necessitate giving up your green thumb. Students at the California Polytechnic State University designed and built INhouse, a net-zero prototype home that’s powered by solar and integrates a smart water-recycling system that doesn’t use a drop of potable water to irrigate plants. Selected as a contender in the 2015 Solar Decathlon competition, INhouse was intelligently designed in response to the climate conditions of coastal California. The state’s hotter-than-usual temperatures inspired one of the most important features of the house: a constructed wetland system that collects all the greywater from the house before filtering and...

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A CALIFORNIA GARDEN IN THE FOURTH YEAR OF THE DROUGHT...

Sep 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Martha Ture DAILY KOS The hummingbird zooms in over the fence about 7 every morning, while I’m watering.  It’s a male Anna’s hummingbird, identifiable by his iridescent rose gorget. He hovers a foot above the hose spray, singing his high-pitched rusty gate greeting, hangs for a few seconds in front of me, and then rises and soars away to a branch in the madrone tree.  I raise the hose and lay some water drops on the leaves for him and return to the arithmetic watering of each garden bed.  In order to approach maximum water efficiency and minimize water waste, I’ve worked out a method for watering in this fourth year of drought in California. I put the moisture meter’s sensor down into the root zone of each row and planter box....

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ALI CHEN BATTLES CALIFORNIA DROUGHT WITH GRASSROOTS ‘CACTIVISM’...

Sep 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] DESIGNBOOM         as california prepares itself for another year in drought conditions american and international professionals — of all sectors — continue their efforts to end the water crisis. online publication archinect recently held ‘dry futures’, a competition that casts architecture as a primary role in creating water-use infrastructure. the contest was split into two categories, speculative and pragmatic, the former of which was won by ali chen for her project, ‘grassroots cactivism’. california cactus farm and wastewater purification plant       current california legislation requires individual households to reduce water use by 25%. while it has helped, agricultural production — responsible for 80% of statewide water consumption — isn’t included within the restrictions. a major portion of the high amount goes directly towards crops that feed livestock, which...

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THE ROLLING STONE ARTICLE EVERYONE SHOULD BE TALKING ABOUT...

Sep 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by DarkScholar DAILY KOS Over the past few days, everyone has been discussing the interview in Rolling Stone where Donald Trump insults Carly Fiorina and generally just behaves like Donald Trump. However, if you read the entire magazine, you will find a far more important article by Tim Dickinson about the recent wildfires in California, Washington, and Alaska. Although it does not feature any comments about Republican candidates’ looks, it has actual relevance for the future of the United States and potentially the entire world. The article focuses on the links between climate change and this year’s disastrous wildfire season. The droughts in California mark an obvious link, but even in places such as Washington where precipitation levels have been normal, changes in weather have increased the risk of fire. My Gut Reaction:...

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THE ROLE OF CLIMATE CHANGE IN UTAH AND ARIZONA’S DEADLY FLOODS...

Sep 17, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]     It’s not causing them, but it might be making them worse. Lydia O’Connor  The Huffington Post   Climate change isn’t what’s causing the deadly flash floods in Utah and Arizona this week, but it’s part of what’s making them so catastrophic, one expert warned. As of Wednesday evening, at least 18 people have been killed by intense flooding near the Arizona-Utah border that began Monday, while others remain missing, including 6-year-old Tyson Lucas Black. Flooding that powerful is an example of how the warmer atmosphere turns ordinary weather events into more extreme ones, Kevin Trenberth, a senior scientist with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, told The Huffington Post. AP Photo/Rick Bowmer A search-and-rescue worker looks down a spillway along a steam after a flash flood on Sept. 15, 2015, in Colorado City, Arizona. A wall of...

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RECEDING SNOWPACK HIGHLIGHTS IMPACT OF CALIFORNIA DROUGHT...

Sep 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     A sparse covering of snow on the Sierra Nevada in California. (oliver.dodd via Flickr) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The snowpack on the Sierra Nevada range between California and Nevada is lower than at any time in the last 500 years. Researchers report in Nature Climate Change that the level of snow at the end of March on the high hills was just one-twentieth of the average for the last half century. Snow is winter rain that doesn’t run off the hills immediately. So in Mediterranean climates—characterised by winter rainfall and warm, dry summers—the snowpack is a vital resource. It melts steadily through spring and summer to keep reservoir levels high, deliver a steady flow to hydroelectricity...

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THIS IS WHAT THE WORLD WILL LOOK LIKE AFTER CLIMATE CHANGE...

Sep 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Humans are destroying the world as we know it…and creating a new one. —By Lizzie Wade  MOTHER JONES Canon.P/Shutterstock This story was first published by Wired and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. A few years ago in a lab in Panama, Klaus Winter tried to conjure the future. A plant physiologist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, he planted seedlings of 10 tropical tree species in small, geodesic greenhouses. Some he allowed to grow in the kind of environment they were used to out in the forest, around 79 degrees Fahrenheit. Others, he subjected to uncomfortably high temperatures. Still others, unbearably high temperatures—up to a daily average temperature of 95 F and a peak of 102 F. That’s about as hot as Earth has ever been. It’s also...

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WORRIED ABOUT REFUGEES? JUST WAIT UNTIL WE DUST-BOWLIFY MEXICO AND CENTRAL AMERICA...

Sep 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Petr David Josek, AP Refugees wait in Budapest   “The Syria conflict has triggered the largest humanitarian crisis since World War II,” explains the European Commission. As Climate Progress has been reporting for years, and as a major 2015 study confirmed, “human-caused climate change was a major trigger of Syria’s brutal civil war.” But the unprecedented multi-year drought that preceded the Syrian civil war is mild compared to the multi-decade megadroughts that unrestricted carbon pollution will make commonplace in the U.S. Southwest, Mexico, and Central America, according to many recent studies. Given the current political debate over immigration policy, it’s worth asking two questions. First: if the United States, through our role as the greatest cumulative carbon polluter in history, plays a central role in rendering large...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS QUESTION GEHRY-LED LOS ANGELES RIVER MASTERPLAN...

Aug 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]  by The Dirt Contributor The Los Angeles landscape architecture and design community was surprised by the recent announcement that Frank Gehry is creating a new masterplan for the redevelopment of the 51-mile stretch of the Los Angeles River that runs through the city. Before The Los Angeles Times published the details of the new Gehry-led team, there were no public discussions about this new approach or the selection of the new design team. Also, it’s not clear what will happen to the approved 2007 Los Angeles River Revitalization Master Plan (LARRMP). The LARRMP, led by engineering firm Tetra Tech, included three landscape architecture firms: Civitas, Mia Lehrer + Associates, and Wenk Associates. The plan is deeply rooted in hydrology and ecology, aims to strengthen communities, and features parks, trails, bridges, public and private facilities,...

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THE DROUGHT YOU HAVEN’T HEARD ABOUT IS CAUSING CRISIS IN AFRICA...

Aug 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]     1 in 10 people across southern Africa are at risk of going hungry. Charlotte Alfred World Reporter, The Huffington Post   Credit: Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/Associated Press Zimbabwe is facing food short shortages due to the regional drought in southern Africa.   Every week, we bring you one overlooked aspect of the stories that made news in recent days. You noticed the media forgot all about another story’s basic facts? Tweet @TheWorldPost or let us know on our Facebook page. The worst drought in almost a decade has decimated agriculture in southern Africa, leaving 1 in 10 people in the region at risk of going hungry. The drought contributed to massive crop failures, including in South Africa which ordinarily produces 40 percent of the region’s corn. The country had to import the crop earlier...

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TO STOP MASSIVE WILDFIRES, WE’RE GOING TO HAVE TO CHANGE OUR STRATEGY...

Aug 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Members of a handcrew prepare to head out during the Okanogan Complex Fire in Washington.    REUTERS/Jason Redmond GRIST By Katie Herzog Even if you don’t live in a state that’s currently burning, you’ve probably heard about the massive wildfires across the country: More than 1,200 firefighters are fighting one huge, hellish blaze in Washington. A 100-foot “firenado” sprouted in Boise like something out of a straight-to-DVD movie. California has seen more than 5,000 wildfires in this year alone. It’s one of the worst fire seasons in history. It’s also, however, the new normal, according to Char Miller writing in The Guardian: Temperatures that spike above long-held norms, record-breaking low-humidity levels, multi-year droughts, tinder-dry vegetation and fierce winds are among the factors fueling these new, more massive infernos. The sooner that firefighting agencies, public officials, policymakers and citizens acknowledge the...

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THIS SCI-FI NOVEL’S POST-APOCALYPTIC FUTURE COULD BECOME REALITY ALL TOO SOON...

Aug 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Ari Phillips CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: flickr/ Vibin JK   Our future selves are all characters in New York Times best-selling author Paolo Bacigalupi’s penetrating and environmentally driven sci-fi novel, The Water Knife, published by Knopf in May and an Amazon Best Book of June 2015. Note to future selves: don’t move to Phoenix. Why not? In the future Phoenix is even hotter, drier, and dustier than it already is. Also it is overrun by migrants from Texas — a state that has been left out to dry, literally, after prayers for rain fell on deaf ears — and hordes of others from across the West hoping to make it to the land of plenty, California, or of at least some, Nevada. Known as “Merry Perrys” after former-governor Rick Perry and his happy-go-lucky...

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HOW MUCH OF CALIFORNIA’S DROUGHT WAS CAUSED BY CLIMATE CHANGE? SCIENTISTS NOW HAVE THE ANSWER...

Aug 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File In this May 18, 2015, file photo, irrigation pipes hang along a dried irrigation canal on a field farmed by Gino Celli near Stockton, Calif. Over the last few years, as California’s historic, four-year drought has intensified, scientists have found clues linking the extreme weather event to human-caused climate change. Now, a new study is the first to estimate just how much climate change contributed to the drought. The study, published Thursday in Geophysical Research Letters, found that climate change can be blamed for between 8 to 27 percent of the drought conditions between 2012 and 2014 and between 5 to 18 percent in 2014. Though these relative contributions of climate change differ between the two periods of time, due to differences in...

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96m WATER-SAVING SHADE BALLS RELEASED INTO LA RESERVOIR – VIDEO...

Aug 13, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Water   The final tranche of 96m black plastic shade balls is released into the Los Angeles reservoir at Sylmar, to help improve water quality and prevent evaporation. The LA water and power department began pouring the balls into the water two months ago, as can be seen in the first clip, and the final balls are introduced this week. The idea was conceived in 2007 in an effort to prevent the reservoir becoming contaminated with bromate, a substance formed when chemicals in the water react with sunlight. The balls are a relatively low-cost solution, at $34.5m, and are expected to save about $250m over 10 years, and prevent 300m gallons of water evaporating Check out our gallery of the shade balls...

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COUPLE TURNS LAWN INTO ECOSYSTEM: OFFICIALS THREATEN TO MOW IT DOWN...

Aug 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Sam DeLong By Katie Herzog GRIST The one good thing about drought is that the lush green lawns outside your neighbors’ houses act as a sort of banner, proclaiming ASSHOLES LIVE HERE. But lawns aren’t just water hogs: They are also monocultures, as devoid of diversity as suburban school districts. Lawns lack the fauna that bees and other important pollinators need to survive. The mass mowing and fertilizing of lawns pollutes the air, the soil, and the groundwater. In short, those prissy, manicured lawns are wasteful and useless — and that’s without mentioning the basic nuisance of waking up to the whine of your neighbor’s push mower at 9 a.m. on a Saturday. In Ohio, Sarah Baker and her partner decided to tackle the lawn problem by letting their rural one-acre lot go wild. They stopped...

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WEST COAST WILDFIRES BY THE NUMBERS: ACTIVE FIRES BURNING IN FIVE STATES...

Aug 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] A look at the number of firefighters at work, people in danger and acres torched so far as the Rocky fire and other wildfires rage on Flames rise above Highway 20 as the Rocky burns near Clearlake, California, on Monday. Photograph: Noah Berger/EPA Erin McCann THE GUARDIAN tes with wildfires burning: five In addition to California, crews are battling active wildfires in Washington, Oregon, Montana and Wyoming. Fires currently burning in California: 22 As of 12pm PT on Tuesday Cal Fire, the statewide firefighting agency, said there were 22 active fires burning in the state, many of them started by lightning strikes. Cal Fire said it has responded to more than 4,200 wildfires so far this year, 1,500 more than the average for this time period. Firefighters at work in California: more than...

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THE WETTEST RAINFOREST IN THE U.S. HAS GONE UP IN FLAMES...

Aug 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] When fire can eat a rainforest in a relatively cool climate, you know the Earth is beginning to burn. By Subhankar Banerjee   THE NATION Paradise Fire Photo Courtesy of The National Wildfire Coordinating Group. The wettest rainforest in the continental United States had gone up in flames and the smoke was so thick, so blanketing, that you could see it miles away. Deep in Washington’s Olympic National Park, the aptly named Paradise Fire, undaunted by the dampness of it all, was eating the forest alive and destroying an ecological Eden. In this season of drought across the West, there have been far bigger blazes but none quite so symbolic or offering quite such grim news. It isn’t the size of the fire (though it is the largest in the park’s history), nor its...

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AGAVE, THE PLANT THAT GETS YOU DRUNK OFF TEQUILA, COULD ALSO HELP DROUGHT-PROOF OUR FOOD SYSTEM...

Jul 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock just give it a shot By Grist staff The humble cactus! Wellspring of tequila, source of nopales tacos, and … our ticket out of fuel and food insecurity? The secret sauce of these succulents is a nifty photosynthesis process unique to species like agave, prickly pear cacti, pineapple, and vanilla orchids, known as crassulacean acid metabolism, or CAM. Plants that rely on CAM require less water to survive — and scientists are hoping they can learn how to engineer non-CAM plants to have the same water-savvy practices. Climatewire has the story: Re-creating an entire metabolic pathway in a plant is far from a simple task. Once scientists figure out all the genes associated with its basic function, as well as its regulation, they then have to find a way to add that genetic material into the target...

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THE LINK BETWEEN CLIMATE CHANGE AND ISIS IS REAL...

Jul 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Joe Romm   CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP/Charlie Neibergall   Democratic presidential candidate Martin O’Malley linked climate change to the rise of ISIS earlier this week. Conservatives pounced. Score this round for O’Malley. For three years now, leading security and climate experts — and Syrians themselves — have made the connection between climate change and the Syrian civil war. Indeed, when a major peer-reviewed study came out on in March making this very case, Retired Navy Rear Admiral David Titley said it identifies “a pretty convincing climate fingerprint” for the Syrian drought. Titley, a meteorologist who led the U.S. Navy’s Task Force on Climate Change when he was at the Pentagon, also said, “you can draw a very credible climate connection to this disaster we call ISIS right now.” Compare the words of...

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WELCOME TO FAIRMEAD, CA., WHERE YOU HAVE TO WALK A MILE FOR A SIP OF WATER...

Jul 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] For some Californians the drought means brown lawns. For others, it means nothing to drink. By Sasha Abramsky  THE NATION The tiny, dusty town of Fairmead, California, feels a long way from anywhere. It’s the kind of place where people come to start anew, hoping to silence the ghosts of hard times past. There are the African-Americans whose families migrated out of the segregated Deep South more than half a century ago, looking for farmwork and a place where they could hold their heads high. There are the migrants from Mexico, who came in search of a slightly better life than the one they had left south of the border. There are the Anglo descendants of refugees from the Oklahoma Dust Bowl. And there are elderly adventurers looking for something new—for a little...

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SURPRISE STORM IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA COLLAPSES BRIDGE AND SUBDUES WILDFIRE...

Jul 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE GUARDIAN Interstate 10 bridge collapse injured one driver and left hundreds stranded Heavy rains helped contain 60% of rampant wildfire amid historic drought A summer storm delivered rain, thunder and lightning to central and southern California on Saturday, leading to beach closures, flash floods and outages that left tens of thousands of people without power. Photograph: John Bender/AP Lauren Gambino in New York A rare and powerful rainstorm has drenched parched southern California, simultaneously wreaking havoc on major roadways and power lines while helping firefighters gain control of a wildfire that broke out on Friday. Heavy rains on Saturday and Sunday closed beaches and knocked out power for many southern California residents. The storm rained out a Los Angeles Angels home game for the first time in two decades. The San Diego...

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THIS IS HOW THE WORLD CLIMATE CHANGED LAST YEAR...

Jul 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Ryan Koronowski CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: NOAA   The state of the world’s climate is complex enough that it takes 413 scientists from 58 countries half a year to completely summarize a year’s worth of data. And 2014 was a doozy. According to the American Meteorological Society and NOAA’s “State of the Climate in 2014″ report, several markers measuring the earth’s climatic trends set historical records. This is the 25th year that scientists have provided this report, and it was full of hundreds of pages of detailed atmospheric and oceanic summaries of what’s happening to our air, land, and water. “The year 2014 was forecast to be a warm year, and it was by all accounts a very warm year, in fact record warm according to four independent observational datasets,” the report said....

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