WHAT IS BIOMIMICRY, ANYWAY?

May 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Grist staff This article is published in partnership with: MCAD Let’s play a game. It’s called “Who made it?” and it goes like this: I’ll describe a series of objects, and you guess who made them. If you guess all of them correctly, there will be a special prize waiting for you at the end of this article. Ready? Let’s begin. First up: an autonomous flying machine that uses insects as fuel, navigates with sound, releases a rich fertilizer as its primary emission, and can fold up into a compact pod while not in flight. It’s also biodegradable. Was this lean green flying machine made by San Francisco-based drone startup WinnginIt, or is it just one in a long line of autonomous fliers that nature has been working on for millions of...

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6 FAB MOBILE OFFICES LET YOU DITCH THE CUBICLE FOR THE OPEN ROAD...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT View Slideshow Summer is just around the corner, which means it’s going to get harder than ever to resist the urge to ditch work for the outdoors. Fortunately, intrepid designers have come up with a solution: the mobile office. From converted caravans to one-of-a-kind builds, each hits the open road to take advantage of gorgeous warm weather and fresh air while allowing workers to stay productive. We’ve rounded up six of our favorite mobile offices, from an off-grid prefab workplace to a cozy WiFi-equipped caravan you could even camp in. #dojowheel by FIVE AM Belgian-based studio FIVE AM designed the #dojowheel, a mobile office that’s so chic and modern we wouldn’t even mind if it were permanently stationary. The retro-chic office combines the efficient minimalism of a Japanese dojo...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (APRIL 16–30)...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by J.R. Taylor A rendering of the forthcoming Presidio land development / The Atlantic Disaster by Design: Houston Can’t Keep Developing This Way – The Houston Chronicle, 4/20/16 “Let’s review the facts before this teachable moment fades away. We live on a very flat coastal plain — much of it only a four-foot drop over a mile. And much of it with very clayey, slow-to-drain soils.” A One-Stop Guide to Designing the Streets of the Future – City Lab, 4/22/16 “Not all urban planners or city governments agree on what kind of street designs are best. But one thing remains clear: Cities who want to plan for the future must prioritize transit accessibility.” A Public Park for Dublin’s Liberties Within Reach for Locals – The Irish Times, 4/22/16 “The steel gates...

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#WLAM2016: THIS IS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by J.R. Taylor The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) just celebrated World Landscape Architecture Month (WLAM). In an effort to help the public better understand what landscape architecture is this past month, ASLA launched a social media campaign: #WLAM2016. The goal of campaign was to connect the term “landscape architecture” with the actual work of landscape architects in communities. We asked our members, colleagues, and friends to take pictures with cards that read “This Is Landscape Architecture” in front of their favorite designed spaces and post them on social media with #WLAM2016. In total, 5,000 posts using #WLAM2016 reached nearly 4 million people around the world. People posted images that showed all phases of design and illustrated the breadth of the profession. Pictures included preliminary sketches and project plans. Landscape...

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THOMAS BALSLEY TELLS HIS STORY THROUGH PUBLIC SPACES...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green Thomas Balsley Uncommon Ground / ORO Editions Thomas Balsley, FASLA, and his eponymous firm have created over 100 public spaces in New York City alone, not to mention numerous award-winning plazas and parks around the U.S. and the world. Over 25 years of practice, Balsley has found opportunities where others may not have looked: in small scraps of land such as “bonus plazas,” otherwise known as privately-owned public spaces, and in “barren, failed places” along post-industrial waterfronts. There, Balsley turned lemons into lemonade for us all, creating humane, beautiful public spaces that show all kinds of landscapes can be made valuable through thoughtful design. His firm’s key projects are explored in the new book Thomas Balsley: Uncommon Ground, which covers everything from “small urban plazas and courtyards to...

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“DEMO:POLIS” ASKS WHAT WE MEAN WHEN WE TALK ABOUT PUBLIC SPACE...

Apr 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   George Kafka  METROPOLIS  MAGAZINE The Pallet Theatre in Granby Park, Dublin, was designed by Seán Harrington Architects. ©Seán Harrington Architects, ©Alice Clancy Two questions had been preoccupying me on my way through the well-tended lawns of Berlin’s Tiergarten to see Demo:polis, an exhibition on the right to public space at the Akademie der Künste: how does one exhibit public space in the white (or concrete gray) cube of a gallery? And what, exactly, are we talking about when we talk about public space? Upon entering the show, my qualms were immediately quieted. The former was made clear from the intelligent layout of the exhibition, whose arrangement echoes the visual language of the subject matter at hand. Pseudo streets, squares, and city blocks are formed by a grid of chipboard panels and encourage the...

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SIMPLE IS AS SIMPLE LIVES

Apr 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture Sure, high tech micro apartments are pretty nifty, but never underestimate the power of good design even with the most meager means. Case in point is Vila Matilde by São Paulo’s Terra e Tuma Arquitetos. Ms Dalva, the owner of the home, has lived in the same location for decades.  When her previous structure started crumblilng down around her, she was faced with two options: buy an apartment that would exhaust all of her savings and put her further from her family, or build a new structure. Ms Dalva’s son reached out to Terra e Tuma to help design the structure we see here. The house took only 10 months to construct, four of which were spent tearing down the previous structure. Time was of the essence because...

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BUCKY’S BIOSPHERE GETS A FRIEND...

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Vanessa Quirk  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE All images courtesy of Dror To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, the New-York based design studio Dror has announced a proposal for the world-famous site: to give R. Buckminster Fuller’s Biosphere, which has served as a landmark monument on Montreal’s Île Sainte-Hélène for decades, a long-awaited companion. The studio has designed another dome, an 150-meter wide aluminum sphere covered by natural vegetation, that would serve as a site for festivals and events. The structure, still speculative at the moment, is meant to suggest an alternative to Parc Jean-Drapeau’s development plan and could feasibly be built within two years. Read on for Dror founder Dror Benshetrit’s statement on the project’s inspiration. From studio founder Dror Benshetrit: In anticipation of the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, the studio developed a new cultural landmark for Montreal’s Île Sainte-Hélène, the original site of the monumental World Fair that took place...

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THIS FLORIDA TOWN WANTS TO BECOME THE MOST SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY IN AMERICA...

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: d3 Creative Studio   When Florida real estate developer Syd Kitson began conceptualizing Babcock Ranch, a planned community located some 20 minutes from Florida’s Fort Myers in 2006, he had a singular goal in mind: prove that a new development could exist in harmony with the environment around it. A decade later, Kitson’s initial vision is about to become a reality. Coinciding with Earth Day, Babcock Ranch had its official reveal on Friday, April 22, with construction on the community’s homes set to begin this summer. If all goes according to plan, Kitson expects that residents will begin moving into the community sometime next year. When the project is completed, it will pull all of its energy needs from a neighboring 74.5-megawatt solar power plant, which will...

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THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Behavior A reader recently sent us this letter and we think it pretty special: Thanks LifeEdited! You are helping fuel our resolve to continue on our journey simplicity. Our story began the summer of 2014.  My husband and I found ourselves empty nesters, in a huge house, with a huge yard, and a huge to-do list of chores and have-to’s. Our bank account non-existent, our paychecks going out the window faster than we could deposit the paychecks.  All the stuff in the world hadn’t made us happy, only miserably in-debt. So we decided to break out of the box we’d climbed into and regain financial freedom and our joy. We spent five months purging and preparing our home to put on the market to sell.  We must have done...

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WE WISH ALL SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENTS LOOKED LIKE THIS...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture We’ve long extolled the virtues of high density, urban living. By keeping things close, you can walk or bike most places, which is better for both physical and planetary health. Density leads to more social interaction, easier distribution of goods and foods. And so on. But we also understand why people are drawn to the suburbs. It’s nice to have a little more personal space and maybe even a yard. In 2002, architectural and development firm ZED Factory completed their BedZED, a unique housing development that fuses the best of urban living with suburban comfort. The word zed, for those unfamiliar with anglo-numerical nomenclature, means zero. In this case, BedZED, located in Wallington, a commuter suburb located 10 miles outside central London, is the “UK’s largest mixed use, carbon-neutral development.” It...

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ARCHITECTURE: THE BODY-CENTERED ART...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Robert Lamb Hart, drawings by Albrecht Pichler Balcony at Fallingwater. The following is an excerpt from Robert Lamb Hart’s A New Look at Humanism, which aims to apply the insights emerging from the sciences of human life—evolution, ecology, and the neurosciences—to design education and practice. In their innovative study, Body, Memory, and Architecture, architects Kent Bloomer and Charles Moore spell out how the experience of architecture originates as a body’s responses—how architecture is, in a sense, a “body-centered” art. They distil our enormously complex human nature into convincing insights, and the ways they trace out their significance make them immediately available to apply in practice. The basic ideas, once they have been stated, may seem simple and obvious and, in fact, have been exploited brilliantly by artists, designers, and critics. Yet the...

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Q & A: THE ARCHITECT BEHIND THE SANDY HOOK REDESIGN...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Vanessa Quirk Rendering of Sandy Hook School, designed by Svigals+Partners Courtesy Svigals+Partners Sandy Hook School, where twenty children and six adults were fatally shot in 2012, will reopen in August of this year. New-Haven based firm Svigals+Partners has carefully led the Connecticut community in a participatory design process, which has aimed to create a space that harbors both security and pride. Metropolis spoke with Julia McFadden, associate principal at Svigals+Partners, via email to discuss how the architect faced the project’s multiple challenges. Vanessa Quirk: What was the hardest part of the Sandy Hook process for you as an individual? As an architect? Julia McFadden: My normal sense of empathy hit a roadblock; I truly couldn’t fathom what it felt like to lose your child in this way. We needed to listen carefully. Concerns that were shared with us early...

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VIDEO COMPETITION: THE LANDSCAPES OF THE ANTHROPOCENE...

Apr 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Jared Green Anthroposcene video competition Many scientists argue we have already entered the age of the Anthropocene, an era in which humanity now determines the Earth’s geology, climate, and ecosystems. While a number of scientists and writers argue this new era marks the decline of nature, others say it may be the start of a future where humans deliberately and responsibly manage the planet’s natural assets. Regardless of where you stand on whether we can achieve a sustainable future in the Anthropocene, this epoch has produced unique landscapes. Anthroposcene, a new competition sponsored by the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA), National Museum of Australia, and LA+ Interdisciplinary Journal of Landscape Architecture, seeks the most compelling videos of the “profoundly frightening and yet somehow incredibly optimistic landscapes” of this new...

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MATERIAL PROVOCATIONS

Apr 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  by The Dirt Contributor Ken Smith Workshop, Croton Water Filtration Plant, New York/ Ken Smith Workshop Landscape architect Ken Smith, FASLA, founder of Ken Smith Workshop, Andrea Cochran, FASLA, founder of Andrea Cochran Landscape Architecture, and James Lord, ASLA, principal of Surface Design, can provoke reactions with their creative use of materials. While these landscape architects couldn’t be more different, what unites them is a passion for how materials can create  memorable experiences. At a recent symposium at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD), each practitioner revealed how they do it. Smith draws much of his creative inspiration from fashion. “I go to clothing stores and look at clothes like people go to art museums. But when you go to stores, you can touch the clothes, inspect the seams, see how things are...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (APRIL 1 – 15)...

Apr 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by J.R. Taylor Olmsted statue / The San Francisco Chronicle / AP Renowed California Landscape Architect Offers Take on Grand Rapids – Grand Forks Herald, 4/1/16  “Walter Hood, in dreadlocks and a sport coat, sat Friday at the head of a set of tables draped in white cloth at the North Dakota Museum of Art, guests listening closely while his voice boomed through the art gallery.” Reading Viaduct Park Would Make Getting Around Philly Easier – Philadelphia Magazine, 4/5/16 “Last September, after visiting the new Whitney Museum in New York, I climbed up to the High Line for what I thought would be a breezy stroll with gorgeous views of the Meatpacking District. How wrong I was.” 12 Projects That Explain Landscape Urbanism and How It’s Changing the Face of Cities...

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MARGIE RUDDICK IS WILD BY DESIGN...

Apr 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green Wild by Design / Island Press “Combining ecological function and design is now mainstream,” said landscape architect Margie Ruddick, ASLA, in a talk at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. “It’s no longer fringe. The culture has caught up.” And it’s caught up to where Ruddick, the winner of the 2013 Cooper Hewitt National Design Award, has been for a while. A leading advocate of the “wild” landscape movement, Ruddick explained how she carefully balances ecological conservation and restoration with a strong sense of design. In 2011, a New York Times article about Ruddick and how she was fined for growing “weeds” in her front yard in Mt. Airy, Philadelphia went “viral” among landscape architects and designers. She ultimately got out of the $75 fine by explaining to...

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Climate Will Become the Most Dominant Factor in Human Health, but We Are Woefully Ill-Prepared...

Apr 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate change is the ticking time bomb in global public health that is being ignored. What needs to be done? By Susie Pearn / AlterNet   MILAN MALPENSA – NOVEMBER 12, 2014: Ebola emergency simulation in Malpensa. A bogus infected patient has arrived in the airport, and then carried to “Sacco Hospital” by a special modified ambulance. Photo Credit: Davide Calabresi / Shutterstock.com The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 140,000 people die annually as a direct result of the climate change that has occurred since the 1970s. As the Earth’s temperature continues to rise, we will fast reach a tipping point where the climate will be the most dominant influence on human health and our health systems, far outstripping current drivers such as the aging population and lifestyle related diseases. By 2050,...

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HOW A SHIPPING CONTAINER COULD BE YOUR NEXT APARTMENT...

Apr 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] With hundreds of millions struggling to pay rent, a surprising solution could be as close as the nearest port. The Danish affordable-housing initiative CPH Shelter uses shipping containers for cost-effective, energy-efficient housing. (Photo: Igor Bezludov via CPH Shelter/Facebook   Even in the happiest nation on earth, students struggle to find housing that accommodates their budget. Now, one architect and his team believe they’ve hit upon a simple solution for young residents of Copenhagen, Denmark: a village made from upcycled shipping containers. “In Denmark, there’s a lack of 20,000 student homes,” Michael Plesner, cofounder and partner at CPH Containers, told TakePart. “If scaled up, container villages can actually help push down the price on the general housing markets of cities, which would benefit everyone.” Advertisement Around the world, some 330 million urban households face...

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THE 10 BEST HOUSES OF 2016

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Vanessa Quirk Hog Pen Creek Retreat, Lake Flato Architects Courtesy Casey Dunn The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected the winners of the 2016 Housing Awards, selecting ten projects that span four award categories: One/Two Family Custom Housing, One/Two Family Production Housing (none selected this year), Multifamily Housing, and Special Housing. Custom Housing: Hog Pen Creek Retreat; Austin, Texas Lake|Flato Architects Courtesy Casey Dunn Courtesy Casey Dunn Independence Pass Residence; Aspen, CO Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Courtesy Nic Lehoux Courtesy Nic Lehoux Island Residence; Honolulu Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Courtesy Nic Lehoux Courtesy Nic Lehoux ​Newberg Residence; Newberg, OR Cutler Anderson Architects Courtesy Jeremy Bitterman & Carey Critchlow Courtesy Jeremy Bitterman & Carey Critchlow Oak Ridge House; Jackson, MS Duvall Decker Architects, P.A. Multifamily Living:​ Cloverdale749; Los Angeles Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects Courtesy Lawrence Anderson Courtesy Lawrence Anderson 1180 Fourth Street; San Francisco Mithun Courtesy Bruce Damonte Courtesy Bruce Damonte Specialized Housing: Whitetail Woods Regional Park Camper Cabins; Farmington, MN HGA Courtesy...

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NEW URBAN MECHANICS: THE START-UP THAT WORKS WITHIN CITY GOVERNMENT...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Rebecca Greenwald  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Courtesy The Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics In 2010 Boston Mayor Tom Menino’s Chief of Staff approached a computer scientist, Nigel Jacob, and a recent Harvard Business School grad, Chris Osgood, with an idea for a new kind of government agency—an agency that would put people, not numbers, at the center of local government projects and processes. That concept soon became the Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics (NUM), a civic innovation group embedded within the local government and run by co-collaborators Nigel and Chris. Now over five years in, Jacob and the NUM team are using technology, design thinking, and both temporary and long-term interventions to create new solutions for the city, from an app to help parents select schools for their children to mini, mobile City...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (MARCH 16-31)...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by J.R. Taylor A new public square in the Fawwar refugee camp in the West Bank, June 2014 / Adam Ferguson/The New York Times/Redux via NY Review of Books Municipality Updating Anchorage’s Dated Land Use Plan – Alaskan Public Media, 3/17/16 “The most-recent projections – which have been adjusted since the price of oil has declined – anticipate Anchorage’s population will grow between 15,000 and 45,000 people within the next 25 years.” A Closer Look at Oceanwide Center’s Proposed Public Open Space – Hoodline, 3/22/16 “The team behind the massive office, hotel and residential development proposed for First and Mission streets, Oceanwide Center, has grand plans for their open space requirement. If approved, 47 percent of the project’s ground-floor area will be privately-owned public open space, accessible to anyone.” Why Landscapers...

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THE DRONES ARE COMING

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Jared Green Drones / South Park There are expected to be 20 million unmanned aerial vehicles or drones in the U.S. by 2020, according to Lisa Ellman, who ran drone policy under the Obama administration. At SXSW Interactive in Austin, Texas, Ellman painted a rosy portrait of a future filled with drones carrying out useful tasks like delivering packages, conducting routine crop dusting on agricultural fields, inspecting oil and gas pipelines, taking aerial photography, and even monitoring endangered wildlife. Meanwhile, the reality is many states and municipalities have restricted or outright banned these flying robots from going anywhere near people due to real safety and privacy concerns. A man in Kentucky recently shot down a drone hovering over his property, claiming the air space above his home was his property....

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CAN TECHNOLOGY SAVE OUR CRUMBLING INFRASTRUCTURE?...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Jared Green Mississippi collapsed bridge / Wikipedia “The infrastructural situation in the U.S. is bad,” said Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kantor at SXSW Interactive in Austin, Texas. Traffic causes “5.5 billion of hours or about $70 billion of lost productivity, costs 2.9 billion gallons of fuel, and increases our healthcare costs by $45 billion each year.” About a quarter of American bridges are crumbling and structurally obsolete; and we hear horror stories nearly every month of another major collapse. “But technology is the big hope.” Kantor argued that embedded sensors can be used to make roads and cars smarter so they can relay traffic reports in real time, identify structural issues and report them, and reduce traffic collisions and fatalities, which also cost the U.S. hundreds of billions...

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TRANSFORMING SPACE MUST BE SEEN TO BE BELIEVED...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture How LAAB fulfilled on the brief must be seen to be believed. Some of the highlights are a tub that doubles as a seating area, an entertainment center that slides out of the wall, sleeping for 4-6 and, perhaps most impressive, a network of “catwalks”–tiny corridors for the cats to play in. The architects said the build necessitated 3mm tolerances to make everything work. Needless to say, most everything is app controllable. Central to making the apartment work was the “Form Follows Time” philosophy, where the space morphs according to the time of day and its attendant use. It’s a concept we’ve long espoused here and on we hope gains traction in architectural thought. LAAB’s fusion of high tech, high design, amazing craftsmanship and lofty thinking has truly set a high...

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6 TINY HOMES UNDER $50,000 YOU CAN BUY RIGHT NOW...

Apr 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] 6 Tiny Homes under $50,000 you can buy right now 21 hours ago  under Architecture, carousel showcase, Features, Gallery, Tiny Homes 0 by Lucy Wang Share on Facebook Pin Tweet+ View Slideshow Are you dreaming of a tiny house to call home? Whether you’re looking to downsize for financial freedom or a smaller environmental footprint, you’ll be pleased to know that a whole market has sprung up to offer a wide array of micro-homes that are not only affordable, but also beautiful to boot. We’ve rounded up six such tiny homes that you can buy right now – from prefabricated cabins available for under $10,000 to a portable timber home ready for move-in and immediate travel. Prefabricated Arched Cabins for under $10,000 One of the most affordable housing options we’ve seen lately are...

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PRITZKER PRIZE WINNER ALEJANDRO ARAVENA RELEASES FREE HOUSING DESIGNS TO FIGHT HOMELESSNESS...

Apr 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] INHABITAT by Lacy Cooke View Slideshow The world faces a staggering housing crisis. Three billion people live in cities, but over one billion live below the poverty line in inferior housing, and an estimated 100 million people are homeless. Fortunately, this year’s Pritzker Prize winner Alejandro Aravena just released four free low-income housing designs as a resource for governments and organizations working to combat these problems. Aravena’s Elemental architecture “do tank” just launched four open system drawings for incremental housing plans. The plans are a new resource for governments that otherwise might not invest in quality housing. To build an incremental house, governments pay for half of the cost – often the ground floor and systems like plumbing and electricity – and residents tailor the rest of the building to their needs. Related:...

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MIT TACKLES THE FUTURE OF INTRASTRUCTURAL INNOVATION...

Apr 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View Dana Snyder  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Rebuild by Design, bird’s-eye view of the New Meadowlands project, with Manhattan on the east. Image courtesy MIT CAU + ZUS + Urbanisten, 2014 In January, MIT’s Center for Advanced Urbanism (CAU) released two books, Infrastructural Monument and Scaling Infrastructure (Princeton Architectural Press), detailing the proceedings from two infrastructure-themed conferences that took place in the Springs of 2013 and 2014 (respectively). The conferences brought together leading architects, policy makers, civil engineers, and other urban design practitioners to discuss important issues, ranging from transportation to disaster relief to policymaking. However, if global urbanism today marks the shift from Global North to Global South as the preeminent stage for urbanization, these books are inadequate representations of that pattern. In one of the books’ more interesting transcriptions, Pierre Bélanger,...

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YOU CAN ORDER HONOMOBO’S PREFAB SHIPPING CONTAINER HOMES ON LINE...

Apr 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lidija Grozdanic  INHABITAT View Slideshow Buying a new home can get stressful and costly – but it doesn’t have to be. Canadian company HonoMobo built an entire collection of flexible, multi-use living units out of reused shipping containers. You can use the structures as a backyard cottage, garage suite, weekend getaway or combine them to create apartments and multi-family developments. The fact that you can simply order HonoMobo houses online makes them even more appealing to homeowners. The company designed three types of units with different layouts and sizes. The small 352 square foot HO2 house has an open plan with a full bathroom and functional kitchen. The HO3 knits three containers together to create a bedroom, bathroom, living room and a large kitchen with an island. The HO4 is the company’s largest, and...

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OIL HEIR BRINGING MORMON-INSPIRED SUSTAINABLE CITY TO VERMONT...

Apr 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] NewVistaFoundation.org  VIA GRIST If You Build It, They Will Groan By Katharine Wroth The tiny towns in Vermont’s Upper Valley are practically postcard-worthy: White steeples, general stores where the owners know your name, rolling hills dotted with spirals of hay and contented cows. But because they are located just off Vermont’s major highway, Interstate 89, and because fiercely independent landowners have historically opposed the idea of zoning regulations, these communities frequently face challenges to their idyllic image. Self-storage companies, cell providers, retailers, and developers have put forth decidedly unbucolic plans plenty of times over the years; sometimes they win, and sometimes — as in the case of a recent effort to build a mixed-use development spurned by environmental groups — they lose. Now residents of the area have learned about an unfolding real-estate...

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