WE NEED MORE BOREDOM IN OUR LIVES...

May 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Rhode Island School of Design’s president believes that if you’re not bored enough, you may be missing something. Rosanne Somerson  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Courtesy Guido van Nispen via Flickr When I used to teach graduate students in furniture design, I would assign them an abstract problem that required them to sit in the studio and draw through free association over a long period of time without getting up from their seats. After about 45 minutes, most students would start to squirm and get uncomfortable. If they hadn’t been in my class they would likely have stood up, checked their e-mail, gone online, or found other distractions. But I encouraged them to push through the discomfort because, after many years of running the same exercise, I had learned that right after the “squiggly” stage, something incredible...

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REVIEW: NACTO’S TRANSIT STREET DESIGN GUIDE...

May 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Dirt Contributor Transit Street Design Guide / Island Press The new Transit Street Design Guide, the third in a series by the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO), is a must-have reference manual for city planners, transportation planners, engineers, urban designers, and landscape architects involved in the design of streets. These books, which include Urban Bikeway Design Guide and Urban Street Design Guide, formulate a new approach to the design of our public rights-of-way, not only as transportation corridors but as important spaces for city life. Street and highway design has been dominated by civil engineering technical manuals, namely American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO)’s Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets — otherwise known as the “Green Book” — along with the Manual of Uniform Traffic...

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PREPARING FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

May 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Jared Green  THE DIRT                                                                                         Gold Coast, Australia, beach erosion / csiro.au As the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) formulates a new approach to our changing world, its Board of Trustees sought to learn what other major design associations are doing to both mitigate and adapt to climate change. At ASLA’s mid-year meeting, representatives from the Urban Land Institute (ULI), American Institute of Architects (AIA), American Planning Association (APA), and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) explained how they are helping their collective membership, which totals hundreds of thousands, face the new challenges. Serene Marshall, executive director of ULI’s center for sustainability, said their goal is to reduce carbon emissions from buildings — which consume about 40 percent of global energy and produce around the same amount of emissions — by 50...

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DYSTOPIA IN THE SKY

May 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] y The first film adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s classic novel “High-Rise” is a decadent romp set against a background of Brutalism. Shumi Bose  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE The Brutalist high-rises in Ben Wheatley’s new film were inspired in part by Ernö Goldfinger’s Trellick and Balfron towers in London. Courtesy Magnolia Pictures For architects, if I may generalize an entire professional community, there are few novelists as cultishly beloved as J.G. Ballard. Borges or Calvino have their fair share of admirers, but to borrow an adjective more frequently applied to buildings, Ballard is the most iconic of literary figures—especially for readers of a concrete-expansion-joint persuasion. Witnessing war as a child, training in medicine, and thereafter writing from a rather bloodless middle-class patch of suburbia, Ballard spun tales of urban life that continue to be uncomfortably visceral. High-Rise was published...

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DESIGN ADVOCACY AND MATERIAL SUSTAINABILITY...

May 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Dora Vanette   METROPOLIS MAGAZINE The Downtown Houston Childcare Center, designed by Kirksey Architecure with the goal of providing flexible learning spaces and utilizing natural materials and textures Photo by: Slyworks Photography Throughout 2015, Metropolis’s publisher and editor in chief, Susan S. Szenasy, led the Metropolis Think Tank series of conversations on the seismic cultural shifts reshaping our society and the importance of injecting a new humanism into design and architecture in order to better deal with emerging challenges. As part of these ongoing discussions, Szenasy engages key industry leaders and gives a voice to different knowledge groups that participate in these processes—from architecture firms and clients to researchers and consultants. On August 26, she talked with the principals of Houston-based Kirksey Architecture about architects as design advocates, master builders, and how material sustainability and building codes...

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THIS ULTRA-COMPACT MICRO KITCHEN UNFOLDS LIKE A SWISS ARMY KNIFE WHEN IT’S TIME TO COOK (VIDEO)...

May 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] With so many of us living in small apartments where every square inch counts, think of all of the space you could save if you could tuck your kitchen away when you weren’t using it. That’s the concept behind Spanish architect and designer Ana Arana‘s Gali system, a portable, ultra-compact micro kitchen with components that unfold like a Swiss Army knife when it’s time to cook. Showcased at the 2016 International Contemporary Furniture Fair during NYCxDesign week, Gali challenged showgoers to imagine the possibilities that can arise when they let go of their notions of what a traditional kitchen should look like. Arana was one of 11 emerging designers representing five countries selected to exhibit at the show through ICFF and Bernhardt Design’s annual ICFF Studio competition. The Madrid-based designer said she got...

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NATION’S LARGEST GREEN WALL OF NATIVE PLANTS BREATHES LIFE IN SF MOMA...

May 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT View Slideshow The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) opened to incredible fanfare on Saturday, as thousands eagerly poured into the newly renovated museum that nearly tripled its gallery space after a three-year expansion project. While Snohetta’s new design and the museum’s dizzying amount of art—there are 19 inaugural exhibitions—will be the main draw to many, we have our eye on another museum addition: the SFMOMA Living Wall. Part art, part landscape architecture, the giant living wall designed by Habitat Horticulture is the nation’s largest public green wall of native plants that also boasts impressive eco-friendly elements. SFMOMA Living Wall by Habitat Horticulture, SFMOMA green wall, SFMOMA living wall, San Francisco green wall, nation’s biggest living wall, U.S. biggest public living wall The massive living wall stands...

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40 PERCENT OF THE BUILDINGS IN MANHATTAN COULD NOT BE BUILT TODAY...

May 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE UPSHOT – NYTIMES These are buildings that do not conform to New York City’s zoning code for at least one reason. Because They Are Too Tall … These tend to be apartment buildings concentrated on the Upper East Side and Upper West Side. Or They Have Too Many Apartments … The West Village and Chelsea are the biggest offenders in terms of density. Or Too Many Businesses … Technically, too many square feet dedicated to commercial uses. Mostly concentrated in Midtown and the East Village. But They Made New York Great. (Sometimes.) By QUOCTRUNG BUI, MATT A.V. CHABAN and JEREMY WHITE MAY 20, 2016 New York City’s zoning code turns 100 this year. That may not sound like cause for celebration — except maybe for land-use lawyers and Robert Moses aficionados. Yet...

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UNIVERSITY LANDSCAPES TEACH, TOO...

May 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green University of Virginia campus / Perfect Soccer Recruit “Landscapes have long been essential to the transfer of knowledge,” said Daniel Bluestone, a professor of history, art, and architecture at Boston University at Dumbarton Oaks’ symposium on landscape and the academy. In ancient Greece, “Hippocrates taught the art of medicine under a tree. And in China, there has been a tradition of educational landscapes, including the book garden.” Fast forward to the founding of some early colleges and universities in the United States, and we see the beginning of a “distinctly American type of educational landscape,” with gardens, arboreta, and designed views. Early American university campuses were designed to “train the eye to outside beauty,” create a long-lasting appreciation for nature, and build important values like self-reliance. Today, some...

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SOLAR-POWERED HOTEL AT OBERLIN IS FIRST IN U.S. TO BE HEATED AND COOLED WITH GEOTHERMAL ENERGY...

May 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Cat DiStasio  INHABITAT View Slideshow The sleepy town of Oberlin, Ohio is primarily known for being home to an historic college of the same name, but its reputation may be refreshed by the addition of a new LEED-certified hotel. The Hotel at Oberlin, whose profits will establish scholarships for students of Oberlin College, celebrated its opening this month. The hotel has a host of sustainable features, ranging from solar power to geothermal heat, as well as reclaimed building materials and locally-sourced foods in the onsite restaurant, making it an environmental star in the heartland. In addition to 70 guest rooms and suites, the Hotel at Oberlin features a bar and restaurant serving locally-sourced foods. The hotel’s adjoined conference facility, the Peter B. Lewis Gateway Center, includes a 3,800-square-foot event space with state-of-the-art...

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ONE BUILDING IS SAVING $1 MILLION A YEAR ON ENERGY. WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF THE WHOLE WORLD WAS MORE EFFICIENT?...

May 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Keith Srakocic The U.S. Steel Building in Pittsburgh saves more than a million dollars a year after retrofitting for better efficiency.   Amid all the talk about transitioning to clean energy sources, consider this: The cleanest energy is the energy we never use. It’s also the cheapest, which is one reason that companies are embracing energy efficiency now more than ever. In fact, energy efficiency — now being rebranded for the business sector as energy productivity — is having a moment. “People have been working on this topic for the last 20 to 30 years, but there still are so many opportunities that need to be unlocked,” Jenny Chu, a manager at The Climate Group, told ThinkProgress. Chu was speaking from the Alliance to Save Energy’s...

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FROM LANDSCAPE TO ECOLOGICAL URBANISM...

May 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green Landscape as Urbanism / Princeton University Press Charles Waldheim, Affiliate ASLA, chair of the landscape architecture department at Harvard Graduate School of Design, is moving away from the “original assertions and ideological charge of landscape urbanism,” a controversial theory he has shaped and promoted. Instead, in his new book, Landscape as Urbanism: A General Theory, Waldheim takes a broader view, arguing that landscape architecture is really the most salient framework for creating more sustainable cities through “ecological urbanism.” Our cities are increasingly complex, and a systems-based approach is needed to sort through all the inter-relationships. In our multi-layered urban world, what better organizing tool can there be than the underlying ecology of a city? Much of the design press seems to agree with Waldheim. The Architect’s Newspaper, CityLab,...

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RED HOOK REIMAGINED: TOWARDS URBAN COASTAL RESILIENCE...

May 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Michael Fletcher  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE New York City Hurricane Evacuation Zones: Red Hook, Brooklyn Image courtesy NYC GOV/TerreformONE Red Hook, Brooklyn is a New York neighborhood so rich in history, culture and diversity that even after its devastation by Super Storm Sandy, many of those who call it home wouldn’t live anywhere else. However, Red Hook faces significant challenges. A series of design and infrastructure missteps, dating back to New York’s Master Builder Robert Moses and the U.S. Housing Authority’s underwriting of the Red Hook Houses in the 1930s, cut the neighborhood off from surrounding areas. There is no subway within Red Hook, and the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway separates it from the rest of the five boroughs. And when Sandy hit, the neighborhood was unprepared, leaving residents on the coastline in squalor. New York City...

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THE HIGH COST OF THE GUEST ROOM...

May 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture 2 Comments Housing Print This Post Pulling data from the US Census, Finder.com found there are 9.4% more bedrooms in the U.S. than people: 357M bedrooms but only 323.4M people–a 33.6 million bedroom surplus. This figure, they note, is probably very conservative because it assumes one person per bedroom and many couples share a bedroom. This surplus is not just a waste of good mattresses, but money. They suggest putting those spare rooms to use. Rent them, Airbnb them, do something other than letting them sit as big dust traps. They estimate that renting all of these rooms for a mere $100 week would yield $174B. But that figure is super conservative too: “Americans in bigger cities could get significantly more than the national average. For example, Phoenix residents can get $338 a...

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A SUBURB THAT PUTS PEOPLE FIRST...

May 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture One of the biggest demerits of suburban living is how they can have an isolating effect on people who live in them. When most suburbanites leave home, they enter a car that’s usually in an enclosed garage where you often drive to another garage at work or the store or wherever. In cities where garages are less common, you leave your home and you’re thrust into contact with your fellow human. We’ve looked at Pocket Communities before, which are communities of single family houses where the front door faces a commons area, fostering a more social living environment. And we just ran across this new suburban development in Mannheim, Germany that puts the humans first in its design. The development, which has many of the hallmarks of suburbia...

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MORE PARKS LET THE DOGS OUT

May 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Jared Green Overton Bark fence / Overton Park Canine lovers everywhere are bow-wowing over new data from The Trust for Public Land (TPL): dog parks have grown 4 percent since 2015 and a whopping 89 percent since 2007. The cities with the most dog parks per resident are Henderson, Nevada; Portland, Oregon; Norfolk, Virginia; Las Vegas, Nevada; and Madison, Wisconsin. TPL released these findings and other numbers in their 2016 City Parks Facts report. Peter Harnik, Hon. ASLA, director of the center for city park excellence at TPL, said: “Americans love dogs, and parks increasingly reflect that people want places for them to get outside and take their dogs with them.” Furthermore, “nearly every big city now has at least one dedicated dog park, often with a name that reflects...

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WHAT IS BIOMIMICRY, ANYWAY?

May 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Grist staff This article is published in partnership with: MCAD Let’s play a game. It’s called “Who made it?” and it goes like this: I’ll describe a series of objects, and you guess who made them. If you guess all of them correctly, there will be a special prize waiting for you at the end of this article. Ready? Let’s begin. First up: an autonomous flying machine that uses insects as fuel, navigates with sound, releases a rich fertilizer as its primary emission, and can fold up into a compact pod while not in flight. It’s also biodegradable. Was this lean green flying machine made by San Francisco-based drone startup WinnginIt, or is it just one in a long line of autonomous fliers that nature has been working on for millions of...

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6 FAB MOBILE OFFICES LET YOU DITCH THE CUBICLE FOR THE OPEN ROAD...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT View Slideshow Summer is just around the corner, which means it’s going to get harder than ever to resist the urge to ditch work for the outdoors. Fortunately, intrepid designers have come up with a solution: the mobile office. From converted caravans to one-of-a-kind builds, each hits the open road to take advantage of gorgeous warm weather and fresh air while allowing workers to stay productive. We’ve rounded up six of our favorite mobile offices, from an off-grid prefab workplace to a cozy WiFi-equipped caravan you could even camp in. #dojowheel by FIVE AM Belgian-based studio FIVE AM designed the #dojowheel, a mobile office that’s so chic and modern we wouldn’t even mind if it were permanently stationary. The retro-chic office combines the efficient minimalism of a Japanese dojo...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (APRIL 16–30)...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by J.R. Taylor A rendering of the forthcoming Presidio land development / The Atlantic Disaster by Design: Houston Can’t Keep Developing This Way – The Houston Chronicle, 4/20/16 “Let’s review the facts before this teachable moment fades away. We live on a very flat coastal plain — much of it only a four-foot drop over a mile. And much of it with very clayey, slow-to-drain soils.” A One-Stop Guide to Designing the Streets of the Future – City Lab, 4/22/16 “Not all urban planners or city governments agree on what kind of street designs are best. But one thing remains clear: Cities who want to plan for the future must prioritize transit accessibility.” A Public Park for Dublin’s Liberties Within Reach for Locals – The Irish Times, 4/22/16 “The steel gates...

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#WLAM2016: THIS IS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by J.R. Taylor The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) just celebrated World Landscape Architecture Month (WLAM). In an effort to help the public better understand what landscape architecture is this past month, ASLA launched a social media campaign: #WLAM2016. The goal of campaign was to connect the term “landscape architecture” with the actual work of landscape architects in communities. We asked our members, colleagues, and friends to take pictures with cards that read “This Is Landscape Architecture” in front of their favorite designed spaces and post them on social media with #WLAM2016. In total, 5,000 posts using #WLAM2016 reached nearly 4 million people around the world. People posted images that showed all phases of design and illustrated the breadth of the profession. Pictures included preliminary sketches and project plans. Landscape...

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THOMAS BALSLEY TELLS HIS STORY THROUGH PUBLIC SPACES...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green Thomas Balsley Uncommon Ground / ORO Editions Thomas Balsley, FASLA, and his eponymous firm have created over 100 public spaces in New York City alone, not to mention numerous award-winning plazas and parks around the U.S. and the world. Over 25 years of practice, Balsley has found opportunities where others may not have looked: in small scraps of land such as “bonus plazas,” otherwise known as privately-owned public spaces, and in “barren, failed places” along post-industrial waterfronts. There, Balsley turned lemons into lemonade for us all, creating humane, beautiful public spaces that show all kinds of landscapes can be made valuable through thoughtful design. His firm’s key projects are explored in the new book Thomas Balsley: Uncommon Ground, which covers everything from “small urban plazas and courtyards to...

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“DEMO:POLIS” ASKS WHAT WE MEAN WHEN WE TALK ABOUT PUBLIC SPACE...

Apr 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   George Kafka  METROPOLIS  MAGAZINE The Pallet Theatre in Granby Park, Dublin, was designed by Seán Harrington Architects. ©Seán Harrington Architects, ©Alice Clancy Two questions had been preoccupying me on my way through the well-tended lawns of Berlin’s Tiergarten to see Demo:polis, an exhibition on the right to public space at the Akademie der Künste: how does one exhibit public space in the white (or concrete gray) cube of a gallery? And what, exactly, are we talking about when we talk about public space? Upon entering the show, my qualms were immediately quieted. The former was made clear from the intelligent layout of the exhibition, whose arrangement echoes the visual language of the subject matter at hand. Pseudo streets, squares, and city blocks are formed by a grid of chipboard panels and encourage the...

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SIMPLE IS AS SIMPLE LIVES

Apr 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture Sure, high tech micro apartments are pretty nifty, but never underestimate the power of good design even with the most meager means. Case in point is Vila Matilde by São Paulo’s Terra e Tuma Arquitetos. Ms Dalva, the owner of the home, has lived in the same location for decades.  When her previous structure started crumblilng down around her, she was faced with two options: buy an apartment that would exhaust all of her savings and put her further from her family, or build a new structure. Ms Dalva’s son reached out to Terra e Tuma to help design the structure we see here. The house took only 10 months to construct, four of which were spent tearing down the previous structure. Time was of the essence because...

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BUCKY’S BIOSPHERE GETS A FRIEND...

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Vanessa Quirk  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE All images courtesy of Dror To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, the New-York based design studio Dror has announced a proposal for the world-famous site: to give R. Buckminster Fuller’s Biosphere, which has served as a landmark monument on Montreal’s Île Sainte-Hélène for decades, a long-awaited companion. The studio has designed another dome, an 150-meter wide aluminum sphere covered by natural vegetation, that would serve as a site for festivals and events. The structure, still speculative at the moment, is meant to suggest an alternative to Parc Jean-Drapeau’s development plan and could feasibly be built within two years. Read on for Dror founder Dror Benshetrit’s statement on the project’s inspiration. From studio founder Dror Benshetrit: In anticipation of the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, the studio developed a new cultural landmark for Montreal’s Île Sainte-Hélène, the original site of the monumental World Fair that took place...

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THIS FLORIDA TOWN WANTS TO BECOME THE MOST SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY IN AMERICA...

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: d3 Creative Studio   When Florida real estate developer Syd Kitson began conceptualizing Babcock Ranch, a planned community located some 20 minutes from Florida’s Fort Myers in 2006, he had a singular goal in mind: prove that a new development could exist in harmony with the environment around it. A decade later, Kitson’s initial vision is about to become a reality. Coinciding with Earth Day, Babcock Ranch had its official reveal on Friday, April 22, with construction on the community’s homes set to begin this summer. If all goes according to plan, Kitson expects that residents will begin moving into the community sometime next year. When the project is completed, it will pull all of its energy needs from a neighboring 74.5-megawatt solar power plant, which will...

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THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Behavior A reader recently sent us this letter and we think it pretty special: Thanks LifeEdited! You are helping fuel our resolve to continue on our journey simplicity. Our story began the summer of 2014.  My husband and I found ourselves empty nesters, in a huge house, with a huge yard, and a huge to-do list of chores and have-to’s. Our bank account non-existent, our paychecks going out the window faster than we could deposit the paychecks.  All the stuff in the world hadn’t made us happy, only miserably in-debt. So we decided to break out of the box we’d climbed into and regain financial freedom and our joy. We spent five months purging and preparing our home to put on the market to sell.  We must have done...

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WE WISH ALL SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENTS LOOKED LIKE THIS...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture We’ve long extolled the virtues of high density, urban living. By keeping things close, you can walk or bike most places, which is better for both physical and planetary health. Density leads to more social interaction, easier distribution of goods and foods. And so on. But we also understand why people are drawn to the suburbs. It’s nice to have a little more personal space and maybe even a yard. In 2002, architectural and development firm ZED Factory completed their BedZED, a unique housing development that fuses the best of urban living with suburban comfort. The word zed, for those unfamiliar with anglo-numerical nomenclature, means zero. In this case, BedZED, located in Wallington, a commuter suburb located 10 miles outside central London, is the “UK’s largest mixed use, carbon-neutral development.” It...

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ARCHITECTURE: THE BODY-CENTERED ART...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Robert Lamb Hart, drawings by Albrecht Pichler Balcony at Fallingwater. The following is an excerpt from Robert Lamb Hart’s A New Look at Humanism, which aims to apply the insights emerging from the sciences of human life—evolution, ecology, and the neurosciences—to design education and practice. In their innovative study, Body, Memory, and Architecture, architects Kent Bloomer and Charles Moore spell out how the experience of architecture originates as a body’s responses—how architecture is, in a sense, a “body-centered” art. They distil our enormously complex human nature into convincing insights, and the ways they trace out their significance make them immediately available to apply in practice. The basic ideas, once they have been stated, may seem simple and obvious and, in fact, have been exploited brilliantly by artists, designers, and critics. Yet the...

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Q & A: THE ARCHITECT BEHIND THE SANDY HOOK REDESIGN...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Vanessa Quirk Rendering of Sandy Hook School, designed by Svigals+Partners Courtesy Svigals+Partners Sandy Hook School, where twenty children and six adults were fatally shot in 2012, will reopen in August of this year. New-Haven based firm Svigals+Partners has carefully led the Connecticut community in a participatory design process, which has aimed to create a space that harbors both security and pride. Metropolis spoke with Julia McFadden, associate principal at Svigals+Partners, via email to discuss how the architect faced the project’s multiple challenges. Vanessa Quirk: What was the hardest part of the Sandy Hook process for you as an individual? As an architect? Julia McFadden: My normal sense of empathy hit a roadblock; I truly couldn’t fathom what it felt like to lose your child in this way. We needed to listen carefully. Concerns that were shared with us early...

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VIDEO COMPETITION: THE LANDSCAPES OF THE ANTHROPOCENE...

Apr 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Jared Green Anthroposcene video competition Many scientists argue we have already entered the age of the Anthropocene, an era in which humanity now determines the Earth’s geology, climate, and ecosystems. While a number of scientists and writers argue this new era marks the decline of nature, others say it may be the start of a future where humans deliberately and responsibly manage the planet’s natural assets. Regardless of where you stand on whether we can achieve a sustainable future in the Anthropocene, this epoch has produced unique landscapes. Anthroposcene, a new competition sponsored by the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA), National Museum of Australia, and LA+ Interdisciplinary Journal of Landscape Architecture, seeks the most compelling videos of the “profoundly frightening and yet somehow incredibly optimistic landscapes” of this new...

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