OBAMA ENDS NEW COAL LEASES ON PUBLIC LANDS...

Jan 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Jenny Rowland –CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: shutterstock   The Obama administration announced Friday that it is stopping most new coal leasing on America’s public lands as it moves to modernize and reform the federal coal leasing program, which has not been updated in more than 30 years. “Given serious concerns raised about the federal coal program, we’re taking the prudent step to hit pause on approving significant new leases so that decisions about those leases can benefit from the recommendations that come out of the review,” Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell said Friday. The plan includes three measures to address these issues and update the federal coal program to account for taxpayer interests and environmental challenges. The Interior Department will conduct a review to identify potential reforms to the outdated program, put...

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THE FEDS WANT TO GIVE $14 MILLION IN TAXPAYER MONEY TO A KOCH BROTHER’S COAL MINE...

Jan 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock/Kritchanut By Katie Herzog   GRIST Damn, it feels good to be a billionaire. Today in WTF News, we learned that billionaire industrialist William Koch — brother of arch conservatives Charles and David Koch — may be getting a $14 million royalty refund after his coal mine on leased federal property in Colorado shut down. And that $14 mil would come compliments of the American taxpayer. When coal is mined from underground on federal land, the federal government is entitled to an 8 percent royalty. But coal-mining companies can claim they face trying economic conditions and ask for a “royalty rate reduction,” Reuters reports. One of Koch’s companies did just that. It’s not a big surprise that a greedy fossil fuel billionaire would ask for an extra government handout. What’s crazy is that the U.S. Bureau of Land Management wants to grant the request. Put another way, to...

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ONE OF THE LARGEST COAL COMPANIES IN THE U.S. JUST FILED FOR BANKRUPTCY...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File Black Thunder Mine, in Wyoming, is owned by Arch Coal Co. Arch Coal, one of the United States’ largest coal companies, filed for bankruptcy on Monday in the hopes of eliminating more than $4.5 billion in long-term debt, according to a press release issued by the company. The news comes as several of Arch’s competitors — Patriot Coal, Walter Energy, and Alpha Natural Resources — have also filed for bankruptcy. Arch Coal is the second largest supplier of coal in the United States behind Peabody Energy, and its mines represent 13 percent of America’s coal supply. …it shows that the second-largest coal company in the United States is unable to pay its debts and provide any return at all to its shareholders...

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ENERGY COMPANY WANTS TO LEGALLY DUMP COAL ASH WASTE INTO VIRGINIA RIVERS...

Jan 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Alejandro Davila Fragoso The Possum Point Power Station will transfer millions of gallons of treated water from toxic coal ash ponds into Virginia’s Quantico Creek if the state water board decides Thursday to allow Dominion, an energy company, to do so. The same could happen in the James River with another Dominion owned facility.   DUMFRIES, VA — From their spacious living room, Taya Barnett and her husband Donald could look out the window Sunday afternoon and see Virginia’s Quantico Creek in all its grandeur. It was rainy but pleasant. Droplets fell here and there on the back porch. All while the blue sky revealed itself through the clouds that reflected on waters that flow through the largest protected natural area in the D.C. metropolitan...

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THIS COUNTRY JUST PROMISED TO GET RID OF ALL OF ITS COAL PLANTS...

Nov 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth Tower Colliery in Wales, now closed, was the oldest continuously worked deep-coal mine in the United Kingdom, and possibly the world. The U.K. announced this week it would go off coal power in the next decade.   The United Kingdom will phase out coal-fired power plants by 2025, the country’s energy secretary announced Wednesday. This comes as welcome news to some — the U.K.’s electricity sector is responsible for a third of the country’s carbon emissions, and coal is a significant part of that. But Secretary Amber Rudd also emphasized the role natural gas would play in the country’s energy future, which disappointed environmentalists. “In the next 10 years, it’s imperative that we get new gas-fired power stations built,” Rudd said. “Gas is central...

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IOWA’S CLIMATE-CHANGE WISDOM...

Nov 21, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By JEFF BIGGERS  NY TIMES Credit Josh Cochran   Iowa City — NEGOTIATORS en route to the United Nations conference on climate change in Paris, scheduled to begin later this month, should take a detour on rural roads here in Johnson County. A new climate narrative is emerging among farmers in the American heartland that transcends a lot of the old story lines of denial and cynicism, and offers an updated tale of climate hope. From Our Advertisers Recent polls show that 60 percent of Iowans, now facing flooding and erosion, believe global warming is happening. From Winneshiek County to Washington County, you can count more solar panels on barns than on urban roofs or in suburban parking lots. The state’s first major solar farm is not in an urban area like Des...

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POWERING APPALACHIA’S BRIGHTER FUTURE...

Nov 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Susanna Hegner, Southern Currents | News Analysis Coalfield communities are getting a much-needed jolt. On October 15, the Partnerships for Opportunity and Workforce and Economic Revitalization (POWER) Initiative announced its first round of grants for communities in 12 states and tribal regions affected by changes in the coal industry and energy sector. The $14.5 million is aimed at helping diversify economies, create jobs, attract new sources of investment and provide skills training for high-quality employment. The POWER effort aligns a range of programs and resources through the Commerce Department, the Labor Department, the Small Business Administration and the Appalachian Regional Commission. The bulk of the first round of funding is going to Kentucky and West Virginia, the two states most severely affected by the downturn in the coal industry. In those...

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EPA RULE AIMS TO CURB TOXIC COAL PLANT POLLUTION IN WATERWAYS...

Oct 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Matthew Brown This June 17, 2011 photo shows PPL Montana’s J.E. Corette coal-fired power plant along the Yellowstone River in Billings, Mont. The Environmental Protection Agency announced new rules Wednesday aimed at curbing the amount of pollution that power plants dump into streams. The rule, known as the Steam Electric Power Generating Effluent Guidelines, targets steam electric power plants — plants that use steam to drive the electric generator — that dump large amounts of toxic pollutants into streams every year. The rule, according to the EPA, marks the first time the federal government has set limits on the amount of toxic metals that power plants can discharge into streams. The EPA estimates that the rule will keep 1.4 billion pounds of toxic metals and other...

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THIS MAP SHOWS WHO OWES THE MOST FOR BURNING ALL THAT COAL...

Sep 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY A new study bills each American $12,000 for greenhouse gas emissions. Jakarta, Indonesia. (Photo: Bay Ismoyo/Getty Images) Sep 10, 2015 Taylor Hill is an associate editor at TakePart covering environment and wildlife.   When it comes to climate change, humans can rightfully claim responsibility for most of the warming the world has seen since the Industrial Revolution. But should all people be considered equally responsible for the damage done? Advertisement Not according to Concordia University researcher Damon Matthews, who calculated which countries contribute the most to climate change and which nations emit the least but nonetheless are paying the price of global warming. Live in Australia or the United States? You owe $10,000 to $12,000 for your carbon sins. Hail from India or Brazil? You’ve got about $2,000 worth of...

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IN APPALACHIA, THE COAL INDUSTRY IS IN COLLAPSE, BUT THE MOUNTAINS AREN’T COMING BACK...

Aug 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] iLoveMountains.org By Laura Gottesdiener GRIST Cross-posted from TomDispatch In Appalachia, explosions have leveled the mountaintops into perfect race tracks for Ryan Hensley’s all-terrain vehicle (ATV). At least, that’s how the 14-year-old sees the barren expanses of dirt that stretch for miles atop the hills surrounding his home in the former coal town of Whitesville, W.Va. “They’re going to blast that one next,” he says, pointing to a peak in the distance. He’s referring to a process known as “mountaintop removal,” in which coal companies use explosives to blast away hundreds of feet of rock in order to unearth underground seams of coal. “And then it’ll be just blank space,” he adds. “Like the Taylor Swift song.” Skinny and shirtless, Hensley looks no more than 11 or 12. His ribs and collarbones protrude from...

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CALIFORNIA LOST $5 BILLION IN PUBLIC PENSION FUNDS DUE TO FOSSIL FUEL INVESTMENTS LAST YEAR...

Aug 19, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Charlie Riede New legislation calls for California’s pension funds to divest from coal, while a report finds that fossil fuel investments cost the funds $5 billion in the last 12 months.   California’s public pension funds lost $5 billion last year through declines in their fossil fuel investments, according to a new report from Trillium Asset Management. The losses for CalPERS and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System were largely due to the price of coal and oil falling between July 2014 and June 2015, the group found. The report comes amid increasing calls — and proposed legislation — for fossil fuel divestment. “It’s important to see that fossil fuels in general, and coal in particular, are risky bets for the pension system,” Brett Fleishman, a...

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TONY ABBOTT IS A CLIMATE CHANGE ‘VILLAIN’ SAYS CANADIAN AUTHOR NAOMI KLEIN...

Aug 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The writer, who is coming to Australia on a speaking tour, says she cannot tell where the coal industry ends and the federal government begins Canadian author Naomi Klein says climate science denial is prevalent in English-speaking countries with a ‘powerful frontier mentality’ such as Australia, Canada, the US and the UK. Photograph: Antti Aimo-Koivisto/Rex Oliver Milman Tony Abbott is a climate change “villain” who is repeating the slogans used by the coal industry in the US, according to bestselling author and social activist Naomi Klein. Coal is the future, insists Tony Abbott as UN calls for action on climate change Klein, who is heading to Australia for a series of public events, said the level of inaction on climate change in Australia was only matched by her native Canada. “In Canada I...

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NEW ZEALAND PLEDGES AN END TO COAL BY 2018...

Aug 8, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock It appears that New Zealand is finally ready to throw their domestic coal habit into Mount Doom — by 2018, the country will cease to use coal as a source of domestic energy production. “Historically coal has played an important role in ensuring the security of New Zealand’s electricity supply, particularly in dry years where our hydro-lake levels are low,” Simon Bridges, New Zealand’s Energy and Resources Minister, said in a statement. “But significant market investment in other forms of renewable energy in recent years, particularly in geothermal, means that a coal backstop is becoming less of a requirement.” Bridges’ statement comes on the heels of the country’s largest electricity and gas retailer, Genesis Energy, announcing its intentions to shut down the last of their two...

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WE MIGHT AVERT CLIMATE CATASTROPHE WITH THIS ONE RADICAL CHOICE...

Jul 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Leaving most of the world’s remaining fossil fuels in the ground could prevent worst-case warming, study says. (Photo: Balazs Koranyi/Reuters) TAKE PART BY Emily J. Gertz   We have about a 50 percent chance of keeping global temperatures from rising dangerously higher than those of preindustrial times—if we leave most of the world’s remaining supply of oil, gas, and coal unearthed and unburned between now and 2050, according to a study published this week in the journal Nature. Globally, about one-third of oil deposits must enter the no-burning zone, along with 88 percent of known and mineable coal supplies and about half the world’s unused natural gas. Advertisemen It adds up to about $6 trillion worth of fossil fuels, suggesting a revolutionary shake-up of the global financial and energy economies. Among them,...

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A POST-INDUSTRIAL STONEHENGE RISES IN SCOTLAND...

Jul 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Liz Camuti As Scotland becomes one of the first countries to run solely on renewable energy, communities face the question of what to do with the country’s abandoned mining infrastructure. In one Scottish village, Sanquhar, the answer is to transform a former coal mine into a 55-acre, $1 million work of land art. Conjuring images of Stonehenge, Crawick Multiverse, which opened July 10 with a ceremony of music and dance, was built from materials found on-site, including 2,000 boulders half-buried below ground. At the urging of local residents, the landowner, Richard Scott, the Duke of Buccleuch, commissioned landscape artist Charles Jencks to build something dynamic that would benefit the region, which has been struggling economically. Crawick Multiverse, “represents the cosmos, from the Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies to a spiral...

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GLOBAL COAL BOOM ENDS AS CHINA — AND WORLD — WAKE UP TO REALITY OF CARBON POLLUTION...

Jul 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm  CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   “Global coal demand is slowing fast,” is the headline in a June Business Insider Australia story. “The global coal renaissance is the most important climate story today,” is the headline in a July Vox story. Which is correct? Mostly the first one. There was a true global coal renaissance starting around the year 2000, a resurgence due primarily to China. But it is now stalling. China was responsible for some 80 percent of the growth in global demand since 2000. You can see that in this June 15 chart from BP’s Group Chief Economist based on their newly-released “Statistical Review of World Energy 2015.” China, however, has completely reversed its strategy of coal-intensive growth as Climate Progress has been reporting since the U.S.-China climate deal...

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AFTER 6 YEARS OF TALK, INTERIOR DEPT. FINALLY RELEASES NEW COAL MINING RULES TO MIXED REVIEW...

Jul 19, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]     Environmental advocates give them a mixed review. Kate Sheppard Senior reporter/Environment and energy editor, The Huffington Post   WASHINGTON — The Department of the Interior issued long-awaited regulations on Thursday for protecting streams from the adverse effects of surface coal mining. The proposed rules, issued by the department’s Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, mark the first major update to the surface mining regulations in 32 years. They will require coal companies to do before and after environmental analysis at mining sites, mandate that companies invest in restoration work like replanting trees, and increase requirements for monitoring of impacts during mining operations. The rules have been in the works for six years. “A lot has changed since rules were written in the early 1980s,” said Interior Secretary Sally Jewell in a call...

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RENEWABLE ENERGY REDOUBLES ITS GLOBAL REACH...

Jun 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Alex Kirby, Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Solar panels on sale at a shop in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. (Wegmann via Wikimedia Commons) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—A significant threshold has been crossed by renewable energy as analysts report that the sector’s size last year reached double the level it was at just 10 years earlier. This expansion happened in a year when the global economy and energy use both grew, but without a matching rise in emissions of carbon dioxide—the main greenhouse gas targeted in efforts to restrain global warming. The report by REN21, a global renewable energy policy network, says the result is an example of sustainable development. Despite the world’s annual 1.5% increase in energy consumption in recent years and 3%...

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New Report Shows EPA’S Proposed Carbon Regulations Will Create Tens Of Thousands Of Jobs...

Jun 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jeff Gentner   By 2020, the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed Clean Power Plan will create nearly 100,000 more jobs than are lost, according to a new report from the Economic Policy Institute, a non-partisan think tank. The report’s initial estimates are higher than some similar studies; however, the institute found that the job impacts of the Clean Power Plan, which limits carbon emissions from power plants, would not last, and would become “almost completely insignificant by 2030.” Coal mining and coal-fired power plants will face the biggest job losses if the Clean Power Plan is implemented, because coal-fired power plants are responsible for 39 percent of the United States’ electricity generation and three-quarters of the sector’s carbon emissions. But other sectors, including renewable energy,...

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Streams and Rivers Left Vulnerable to Pollution Under New “Clean Water Rule”...

Jun 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] WATERKEEPER ALLIANCE The new Clean Water Rule, issued by the US EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers, reduces the agencies’ jurisdiction to protect waters that have previously been covered by the Clean Water Act since the 1970s. The rule redefines what exactly constitutes the Waters of the US, exempting streams and rivers and allowing these waters to be filled with toxic coal ash and other waste. The rule also grants immunity to industrial-scale livestock facilities and includes an exclusion that allows industries to escape treatment requirements by impounding waters of the United States and claiming the impoundment is a waste treatment system, or by discharging wastes into wetlands. “From the smallest tributary, to the mightiest river, to our lakes, bays and ocean, clean water connects us to many valuable resources. Maintaining legal...

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Opponents Of Obama’s Carbon Pollution Rule Are Trying Nearly Everything To Take It Down...

Jun 8, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   by Ryan Koronowski CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock When the Obama administration unveiled its plan to make the most significant move ever to tackle the carbon pollution that causes climate change, it expected opponents to throw everything they had, even the kitchen sink, against it. So it can be hard to keep track of all the tactics that critics in Congress, the states, and industry have been using to keep the administration from regulating carbon dioxide from power plants. Some are redundant, some are doomed to fail, and some have a chance of stopping or fatally delaying the rule. But first, it’s important to keep in mind what the carbon rule actually is. The proposed rule, part of the Clean Power Plan, provides states with the flexibility to craft their own plans to...

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Obama Administration Opens Up Thousands Of Acres Of Public Lands To Coal Mining...

Jun 2, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha GeilingCLIMATE PROGRESS Coal mining in Wyoming’s Powder River Basin. CREDIT: Shutterstock On May 29, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management released a regional management plan for the Buffalo Field Office, the Wyoming office charged with managing the Powder River Basin, an area that supplies nearly 40 percent of U.S. coal. Under the proposed plan, the BLM estimates that it will issue 28 new coal leases, which could open up the mining of 10 billion tons of coal over the next 20 years. That seems like a lot of coal. But is it really? “It’s a huge amount, especially because the leasing period is the time frame that the world needs to get a handle on carbon emissions,” Shannon Anderson, an organizer with the environmental non-profit Powder River Basin Council, told ThinkProgress....

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CAPITALISM COULD KILL ALL LIFE ON EARTH...

May 30, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By The Daily Take Team, The Thom Hartmann Program | Op-Ed (Image: Coal smoke via Shutterstock) Are we going to let capitalism destroy life on Earth? According to 99 percent of climate scientists – we’ll know by the end of the century. Scientists have agreed for three decades about what is causing atmospheric temperatures to rise – humans are burning Earth’s carbon resources to fuel economic activity. But even before we knew what was causing the temperature to rise – scientists warned about the dire global impacts of a two degree increase in atmospheric temperatures. Earth’s climate has been basically stable for hundreds of thousands of years. But that changed during the industrial revolution – when Great Britain realized the potential of coal-powered steam engines. Soon continental Europe and the US followed...

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Mountaintop Removal Mining Is Pushing Species to Extinction...

May 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Two crayfish — a primary food for Appalachia’s most popular sport fish — may get endangered status due to coal mining. By Dac Collins / Appalachian Voices   VIA ALTERNET he U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing that two species native to Appalachia — The Big Sandy crayfish (pictured) and Guyandotte River crayfish — be listed as endangered under federal law after determining the species are in danger of extinction “primarily due to the threats of land-disturbing activities” such as mountaintop removal coal mining. Photo Credit: Zachary Loughman, West Liberty University/Flickr If you find yourself at a crawfish boil anytime soon, don’t be afraid to go back for seconds. The two species that are sold commercially — red swamp and white river crayfish — are prolific. They can be found in the...

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11 Western Towns Say Coal Companies Are Cheating Taxpayers Out Of Billions...

May 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS The old mining town of Telluride, Colo., is pictured nestled in a valley from the top of Mount St. Sophia, in this July 17, 2001, file photo. CREDIT: AP Photo/Ed Andrieski For Western mountain towns, where climate change has shortened the ski season, diminished the snowpack, and increased fire risks, the fair value of coal is a serious question. Coal, when burned, is a major carbon emitter, and is increasingly being mined out of publicly-owned lands in the Rockies. But a group of 11 ski towns is now fighting back against cheap Western coal, the cost of which they say is being kept low due to a federal loophole. Organized under the Mountain Pact, the group of towns, which includes Park City, Utah and Telluride and Aspen, Colorado,...

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Big Coal’s big scam: scar the land for proft, then let others pay to clean up...

Apr 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] George Monbiot  THE GUARDIAN Keep it in the ground: Energy giants claim they dig new opencast mines to fund the closure of old ones. Will anyone call their bluff? The Ffos-y-fran coalmine. ‘Why are we digging coal anyway, when we cannot afford to burn it?’ Photograph: Matt Cardy/Getty Images     Wrapped up in this story is everything that’s wrong with the way our economy works. Corporations ream the land with giant holes, extract a stack of money, then clear out, leaving other people with the costs. There’s a briefer description: legalised theft. This is an account, scarcely mentioned in the national media, of the massive unfunded liabilities emerging from coalfields throughout Britain that opencast mining companies have been allowed to walk away from. In terms of irresponsibility, it’s comparable to the nuclear...

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If We Dig Out All Our Fossil Fuels, Here’s How Hot We Can Expect It to Get...

Apr 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Michael Greenstone   nytimes  THE UPSHOT World leaders are once again racing to avert disastrous levels of global warming through limits on greenhouse gas emissions. An agreement may be in reach, but because of the vast supplies of inexpensive fossil fuels, protecting the world from climate change requires the even more difficult task of disrupting today’s energy markets. The White House last month released a blueprint to reduce United States emissions by as much as 28 percent by 2025. The plan lays the groundwork for the formal international climate talks this December in Paris, where the goal is a treaty on emissions that will seek to limit the rise in global temperatures to 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit above preindustrial levels. Beyond 3.6 degrees, scientists say, the most catastrophic climate consequences will occur, possibly including...

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Here’s why GOP lawsuits probably won’t undermine Obama’s climate plan...

Apr 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Talk News Radio Service By Tim McDonnell  GRIST This story is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Thursday morning, several of the nation’s top environmental lawyers gathered at the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., for the first round of arguments in a pair of lawsuits challenging the cornerstone of President Barack Obama’s climate plan. One of the suits was brought by coal company Murray Energy, the other by a group of a dozen states (all with Republican governors, and all either large producers or consumers of coal); they both contend that the Environmental Protection Agency doesn’t have the authority to set tough new standards for carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. The rules, first proposed last summer, are designed to cut the nation’s carbon footprint 30 percent by 2030...

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American Companies Are Shipping Millions Of Trees To Europe, And It’s A Renewable Energy Nightmare...

Apr 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] AP/Winfried Rothermel by Ari PhillipsCLIMATE PROGRESS In late March, a loosely affiliated coalition of southerners gathered outside of the British Consulate in Atlanta, Georgia with an unusual concern: wood pellets. The group, primarily made up of outdoors enthusiasts and conservationists, had traveled from multiple states to British Consul General Jeremy Pilmore-Bedford’s doorstep. Chief on their minds was the rapidly increasing use of the pellets, a form of woody biomass harvested from forests throughout the southeastern U.S. and burned for renewable electricity in Europe. According to the group, what started as a minor section of Europe’s renewable energy law has now burgeoned into a major climate and environmental headache. “We were trying to elevate the profile of what exactly is going on on the ground here in the U.S.,” Shelby White, who helped organize...

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Turns out the world’s first “clean coal” plant is a backdoor subsidy to oil producers...

Mar 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] SaskPower CCS By David Roberts GRIST The world’s first “clean coal” plant — that is, the first full-size coal-fired power plant ever to capture and store the majority of its CO2 emissions — is located in, of all places, Saskatchewan. (They should change the name to “Of All Places, Saskatchewan.”) According to the first financial analysis done on the project, it appears to be functioning primarily as a public subsidy to the province’s aging oil industry. This takes a little explanation. First some quick background on the project. — The Boundary Dam Power Station, located just north of the North Dakota border, is the province’s oldest and largest coal-fired power plant. Its first boiler was commissioned in 1959. Boilers have been added and decommissioned over the years; there are now six, four of...

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