Contamination Threatens One of the World’s Biggest Freshwater Supplies...

Aug 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Scientists find high salt and arsenic concentrations in an aquifer that 750 million people rely on for drinking water and irrigation. This dry-season rice crop in northwest Bangladesh’s Barind region was irrigated using water pumped from wells that sink almost 250 feet deep into the Bengal Aquifer System, which is in South Asia’s Indo-Gangetic Basin. (Photo: WG Burgess) Emily J. Gertz is an associate editor for environment and wildlife at TakePart.   Three-quarters of a billion people across four South Asian nations rely on one vast water basin for much of their irrigation and drinking water. Called the Indo-Gangetic Basin, it stretches east to west over 618 million acres, sitting like a cap over the Indian subcontinent, and contains about 7,200 cubic miles of groundwater, roughly 20 times the annual flow of the...

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An ‘Unprecedented’ Pair of Hurricanes Is Churning Toward Hawaii...

Aug 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Maddie Stone Hurricane Madeline (left) and Lester (right) churning toward Hawaii on Monday. Image: NASA via Weather Underground In what’s being hailed a meteorological first, two back-to-back hurricanes are marching toward Hawaii, both of them threatening torrential rains and rip-roaring winds this week. The closer of the two, hurricane Madeline, could break a second meteorological record as the first hurricane to strike the Big Island since bookkeeping began in 1949. Rumbling west at approximately 9 mph, Madeline is currently packing Category 3 windspeeds of 120 mph. Its latest track has the storm passing south of the Big Island on Thursday, although as meteorologists Bob Henson and Jeff Masters point out over at Weather Underground, it’s too early to rule out the possibility of landfall on the island of Hawai’i. In any case, the...

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GREAT LAKES WATER TO BE SOLD TO CHINA AS HALF OF U.S. FACES EXTREME WATER CRISIS...

Aug 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Great Lakes Water To Be Sold To China As Half Of U.S. Faces Extreme Water Crisis Uncategorised, On The Water, Extra   NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC If you found your way to this article recently, you may have discovered it on Snopes or another mythbuster page.  We added a feature for a period of time where users could add articles to our site.  The glitch that went un-noticed was that some articles went live without review…. automatically.  For this reason, some highly opinionated personal viewpoints with a mix of facts and phobia were published for fear’s sake on our site.  I have removed the content that was here, and replaced it with this great review on the topic by National Geographics’ Lisa Borre.  Check out her link at the bottom for comments and questions on the...

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Climate Change Pledges Not Nearly Enough to Save Tropical Ecosystems...

Aug 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Jeremy Hance, Mongabay | News Analysis US Secretary of State John Kerry signs the Paris Agreement at the UN in New York while holding granddaughter Dobbs Higginson on his lap. Scientists warn that the agreement is insufficient to prevent disastrous climate change. (Photo courtesy of US Department of State) The Paris Agreement marked the biggest political milestone to combat climate change since scientists first introduced us in the late 1980s to perhaps humanity’s greatest existential crisis. Last December, 178 nations pledged to do their part to keep global average temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) over preindustrial levels — adding on an even more challenging, but aspirational goal of holding temperatures at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). To this end, each nation produced a pledge...

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Egyptian researchers discover a way to grow forests in the desert with sewage...

Aug 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Julie M. Rodriguez  INHABITAT View Slideshow Desertification is a major issue throughout Africa, but there’s a simple way to stop the spread of deserts into fertile land: planting forests. The problem is that in the regions hardest hit by the phenomenon, there simply isn’t enough clean water to properly nurture the trees and keep them healthy. But an innovative project in Egypt proves that it can be done using repurposed wastewater instead of tapping into the sparse fresh water supply. The trees grown in the forest are thriving, and in fact, the eucalyptus trees have been found to produce wood at four times the rate of pine plantations in Germany. Located about two hours from Cairo, the Serapium forest is part of a program initiated by the Egyptian government in the...

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Four Arrested In Protest, But Feds Continue With Plan To Sell The Gulf To Oil Interests...

Aug 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Another 138,000 acres off Louisiana’s coasts will be explored for oil. Activists deliver flood debris to the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management in New Orleans on Tuesday, the day before the agency leased more Gulf waters for oil extraction. CREDIT: COURTESY 350.ORG Four people were arrested for trespassing at the New Orleans office of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) on Tuesday, after they delivered a petition with nearly 200,000 signatures calling for President Obama to cancel plans to lease off parts of the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas development. “We tied the recent flooding to the effects of climate change and the ongoing drilling in the Gulf,” said one of the arrested activists, retired teacher Renate Heurich, 61. BOEM auctioned more than 138,000 acres of the Gulf to oil...

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Inaction on Climate Change Could Cost Millennials $8.8 Trillion in Lifetime Income...

Aug 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Economy A new study has found that without action on climate change, the millennial generation as a whole will lose nearly $8.8 trillion in lifetime income dealing with the impacts of climate change. By Amy Goodman / Democracy Now!   VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com A new study has found that without action on climate change, the millennial generation as a whole will lose nearly $8.8 trillion in lifetime income dealing with the economic, health and environmental impacts of climate change. The study, “The Price Tag of Being Young: Climate Change and Millennials’ Economic Future,” was produced by NextGen Climate and Demos. We speak to Heather McGhee, president of Demos and Demos Action. This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form. AMY GOODMAN: As we continue to talk about...

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From Glacierless National Park to the Neverglades: Meet your future national parks...

Aug 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Human/Nature By Kate Yoder   GRIST.ORG On their 100th anniversary, Grist is exploring America’s national parks and the humans who use them. See the full series. The famous landscapes we love are changing in mostly imperceptible ways, except to the scientists who study them. Climate change is altering them slowly and irrevocably, and soon enough the effects will be obvious to the naked eye. Towering redwoods and sequoias will be sucked dry, turning into brittle trees with brown leaves and cracked bark. Glorious, snowcapped mountains will transform into rocky, barren peaks. In our lifetimes, the national parks will face an identity crisis. They’re named for glaciers and forests that once seemed impervious to time, but are gradually vanishing. Will we keep their names as an ode to the defining features we once cherished? Or...

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Solar Delivers Cheapest Electricity ‘Ever, Anywhere, By Any Technology’...

Aug 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Joe Romm Dr. Joe Romm is Founding Editor of Climate Progress, “the indispensable blog,” as NY Times columnist Tom Friedman describes it.   Half the price of coal! Chile exceeded 1000 Megawatts of solar this year. CREDIT: ACERA. Chile has just contracted for the cheapest unsubsidized power plant in the world, Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) reports. In last week’s energy auction, Chile accepted a bid from Spanish developer Solarpack Corp. Tecnologica for 120 megawatts of solar at the stunning price of $29.10 per megawatt-hour (2.91 cents per kilowatt-hour or kwh). This beats the 2.99 cents/kwh bid Dubai received recently for 800 megawatts. For context, the average residential price for electricity in the United States is 12 cents per kilowatt-hour. “Solar power delivers cheapest unsubsidised electricity ever, anywhere, by any technology,” BNEF Chair...

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REFORESTATION CAN TURN BACK THE CARBON CLOCK...

Aug 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG Martin Brigden / (CC-BY-2.0) LONDON—The ecological and carbon cost of rainforest destruction goes on accumulating for years after nations halt the conversion of canopy into farmland, scientists have found. This implies that to meet ambitious targets, global strategies to combat climate change—including forest restoration—should have started years ago. Tropical forests soak up vast quantities of carbon dioxide released by industrial combustion of fossil fuels, limiting global warming. Burning, clear-felling and ploughing of forest lands release centuries of stored carbon back into the atmosphere to accelerate global warming and climate change. So forest conservation and carbon emissions reduction are both vital parts of any strategies to contain global temperature rises. Researchers report in the journal Current Biology that they looked at the history of forest clearance...

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HOPES RISE FOR UNDERGROUND CARBON STORAGE SCHEME...

Aug 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     A cold-water geyser from an unplugged oil exploration well in Utah. (Mike Bickle / Cambridge Centre for CCS) LONDON—Geologists have resolved one great problem about the capture of carbon dioxide from coal-fired or gas-fired power stations and its sequestration deep in the Earth, with what appears to be the prospect of rock-solid carbon storage. Once there in the right rock formations, there’s no reason why it should escape. That is, it won’t react with groundwater, corrode the rocks around it and dissolve its way back to the surface in 10,000 years—or even 100,000 years. And scientists report in Nature Communications journal that they can say this with confidence because they have identified natural reservoirs of CO2 at least 100,000 years old, deep...

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Report: Deadly ‘Smoke Waves’ Will Inundate the West as Wildfires Grow...

Aug 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Climate change is accelerating fires that produce dangerous levels of pollution. A firefighter pulls a hose while battling flames in the Sand Fire in Placerita Canyon in Santa Clarita, California, on July 24. (Photo: David McNew/Getty Images) David Kirby has been a professional journalist for 25 years. His third book, Death at Seaworld, was published in 2012.   As wildfires ravage California and other parts of the American West, a new study warns that choking “smoke waves” from fires will become more frequent, severe, and long lasting as climate change warms the atmosphere. The study includes an interactive map of 561 Western counties that allows the public, scientists, and policy makers to view recent and projected smoke waves—defined as two or more consecutive days with high levels of particulate matter...

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They survived Hurricane Katrina and rebuilt in Baton Rouge. Now they’ve lost everything again....

Aug 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Post Nation By Emma Brown, Ashley Cusick and Mark Berman Tristan, 7, and Jaydan Rose, 6, help their parents remove flooded furniture from their home in Central, La. (Courtesy of Trinice Rose) BATON ROUGE — When Hurricane Katrina leveled New Orleans, thousands of people left behind their ruined homes and took refuge here. They found new jobs and rebuilt their homes. Slowly, things started to feel normal again. But then a nameless storm brought unprecedented flooding to Baton Rouge and a wide swath of southern Louisiana over the last week. Countless Katrina survivors have been left, for a second time, with nothing. “Everything was going good,” said Trinice Rose, a nurse who escaped her home near Baton Rouge on foot as the floodwater rose — 11 years to the month after her home...

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Here’s how life looks on Louisiana’s forgotten coastline...

Aug 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Levee on Route 46, Saint Bernard, Louisiana. Virginia Hanusik down by the backwater By Laura Bliss  GRIST This story was originally published by CityLab and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The coast of southeast Louisiana is disappearing faster than anywhere else in the world — scientists estimate a football field of land is lost to rising sea levels every hour. With the earth literally shifting beneath their feet, communities have to adapt. Many families are stalwartly digging in, elevating their properties to precarious heights, though perhaps no more precarious than the conditions they’re responding to. Other residents appear to be living life as usual, enjoying the degree of comfort that comes with living inside the region’s extensive flood protection system. Some are even building anew. Those situated outside...

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The Latest California Wildfire Just Devastated an Area Still Rebuilding From Last Year’s Blazes...

Aug 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] What’s missing from the media right now…and our experiment to fix it MOTHER JONES Lake County’s Clayton Fire is only five percent contained. Will GreenbergAug. 15, 2016 7:21 PM Courtesy of Cal Fire Lake County, California is ablaze again. A wildfire erupted there on Saturday night, and has already burned 4,000 acres and is only 5 percent contained. The cause of the fire remains unknown.The blaze comes just as the county had started to rebuild from last year’s calamitous fire season. Three major fires—the Valley Fire, the Rocky Fire, and the Jerusalum Fire—took out thousands of buildings and over 170,000 acres in 2015. The Valley Fire, the largest of the three, destroyed nearly 2,000 buildings itself, and killed four people.   More than 9,000 firefighters are currently addressing 8 large fires across the...

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U.K. Approves World’s Largest Wind Farm...

Aug 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] CREDIT: SHUTTERSTOCK The U.K. government on Tuesday approved phase two of the world’s largest wind farm, adding 300 turbines to a project 55 miles off England’s shore, in the North Sea. The Hornsea Two project will provide 1.8 gigawatts of generating power, in addition to the first phase’s 1.2 gigawatts. In all, the 3 gigawatts provided by Hornsea is enough to power 2.5 million average (U.S.) households. At that size, the combined project is roughly equivalent to a nuclear power plant. CREDIT: DONG ENERGY “Offshore wind is already on course to meet 10 percent of the U.K.’s electricity demand by 2020,” said Huub den Rooijen, Director of Energy, Minerals and Infrastructure at The Crown Estate, the government’s asset management firm. “Major developments of Hornsea Project Two’s scale will pave the way for its...

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Giant Coral Reef in Protected Area Shows New Signs of Life...

Aug 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By KAREN WEINTRAUB   nytimes Photo A giant clam in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area. Credit Craig Cook/Undersea Medical In 2003, researchers declared Coral Castles dead. On the floor of a remote island lagoon halfway between Hawaii and Fiji, the giant reef site had been devastated by unusually warm water. Its remains looked like a pile of drab dinner plates tossed into the sea. Research dives in 2009 and 2012 had shown little improvement in the coral colonies. Then in 2015, a team of marine biologists was stunned and overjoyed to find Coral Castles, genus Acropora, once again teeming with life. But the rebound came with a big question: Could the enormous and presumably still fragile coral survive what would be the hottest year on record? This month, the Massachusetts-based research team finished...

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BRAZILIANS USE OLYMPICS TO DELIVER CLIMATE MESSAGE...

Aug 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  Jared Green 2016 Rio Olympics Opening Ceremony / NBC The estimated 3.3 billion people who watched the opening ceremony of the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, saw a beautiful and compelling case for fighting climate change. Brazil, which is to critical to global efforts, given its stewardship of the Amazon rainforest, decided to use its big moment on the global stage to make the message clear: climate change will impact us all, and we must all do something, even if it’s simply planting a tree. In the beginning of the ceremony, the Amazon was depicted as the great web of life, a multi-layered network, which is really how a forest functions, according to biomimicry pioneer Janine Benyus (see image at top). We then see dancers from the indigenous tribes...

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ARE WE LOOKING AT A MASS EXTINCTION EVENT...

Aug 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] If you or someone you know needs proof that global climate change is real and is happening before our very eyes, you could go to the “State of the Climate Report” put together by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). But just turning on the television or opening the newspaper these days should be enough to raise alarms. Over the weekend for instance, Ellicott City, just up the road in Maryland, was nearly washed away in a 1000-year flooding event similar to what recently happened in West Virginia. Across the world, more than 150 people were killed in floods in India and 1.1 million more Indians were displaced in flooding that wiped out large swatches of infrastructure and agricultural land. Out in the Western United States, firefighters north of Los Angeles were...

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HERE ARE 7 TERRIFYING CHARTS THAT SHOW EXACTLY WHAT WE’RE DOING TO THE PLANET...

Aug 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Scientists have some bad news for Earth. Oliver Milman MOTHER JONES Bernhard Staehli/Shutterstock This story was originally published by the Guardian and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The world is careening towards an environment never experienced before by humans, with the temperature of the air and oceans breaking records, sea levels reaching historic highs and carbon dioxide surpassing a key milestone, a major international report has found. The “state of the climate” report, led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration with input from hundreds of scientists from 62 countries, confirmed there was a “toppling of several symbolic mileposts” in heat, sea level rise and extreme weather in 2015. “The impacts of climate change are no longer subtle,” Michael Mann, a leading climatologist at Penn State, told...

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ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS CAN CUT GAS IMPORTS...

Aug 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Paul Brown / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Making existing buildings in Europe more energy efficient could create a million new jobs. (Tapio Liller via Flickr) LONDON—A renovation programme to cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from buildings in Europe could create a million jobs, provide warmer homes, more comfortable factories and offices, reduce fuel bills across 28 countries, and cut imports of Russian gas, researchers say. This is because buildings are currently the biggest single emitter of GHGs in Europe. Many have inefficient heating and cooling, combined with poor insulation. But with existing technology and political will, they could be transformed into energy producers and become carbon-neutral, says a report produced by OpenEXP, an international group of experts helping policymakers to reach sustainable development goals. According to the report, written by...

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James Cameron has a new movie where everyone drowns at the end...

Aug 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] It Is A Mathematical Certainty By Katie Herzog Academy Award–winning filmmaker James Cameron will premiere a short film, Not Reality TV, Wednesday night at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. And while Leonardo DiCaprio is noticeably absent from this Cameron film, disaster is certainly not: The subject of the short — which features scenes from the upcoming season of Years of Living Dangerously — is climate change. “We made this film to show the reality of climate change — how it’s directly affecting millions of people each day,” Cameron said in a press release. “America just experienced its hottest year ever, rapidly rising sea levels are threatening coastal communities and causing migrations across the globe, and extreme weather events like wildfires and hurricanes continue to spiral out of control as temperatures rise. As I’ve said before, to...

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A Former Governor Admitted He Put Economics Ahead Of Safety When Approving Fracking Projects...

Aug 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster Former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell speaks during a news conference in Harrisburg, Pa. in 2010.   Former Pennsylvania Governor Ed Rendell, who presided over the state’s fracking boom of the mid-2000s, admitted the state’s fracking regulations favored economics over environmental safety during much of his tenure. “I made a mistake in the rush to get the economic part of fracking delivered to Pennsylvania,” said Rendell during an event at the Democrat National Convention Wednesday, State Impact reported. “We didn’t regulate well construction and….frack water as well as we should. We cured that in 2010 and we haven’t had any significant incidents since.” Rendell, a former chairman of the Democratic National Committee, governed Pennsylvania from 2003 to 2011. That was right when improvements...

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The Front Lines of Climate Disruption: Alaskans Witness Collapsing Mountains, Shattered Lives...

Aug 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Dahr Jamail, Truthout | News Analysis Helicopters ferry water to drop on a wildfire just south of Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo: Dahr Jamail) The impacts of anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) across Alaska are devastating to witness. In late June, due to glaciers melting at unprecedented rates, the side of a mountain nearly a mile high in Alaska’s Glacier Bay National Park, which had formerly been supported by glacial ice, collapsed completely. The landslide released over 100 million tons of rock, sending debris miles across a glacier beneath what was left of the mountain. This is something that has been happening more often in recent years in the northernmost US state. While Alaska’s local conservative media often tend to feign ignorance of the cause of such phenomena, what’s causing it is all too...

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DESIGN COMPETITION: A MORE RESILIENT WEST PALM BEACH...

Jul 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Jared Green   THE DIRT Shore to Core / Van Alen Institute and West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency West Palm Beach, a city of nearly 100,000 some 70 miles north of Miami, is grappling with how to protect itself from sea level rise. Much of this long, thin 50-square-mile city fronts the Atlantic Ocean. While in the past this form of development maximized its appeal as a waterfront city, now that exposure elevates their risk. To create a sustainable and resilient future, the West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency has partnered with the Van Alen Institute to create Shore to Core: Vision for a Waterfront City, an  urban design competition, to rethink its future trajectory. The design competition though calls for interdisciplinary teams of designers (landscape architects, urban designers, architects) along with experts...

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Cooling measures are big and getting bigger: The global impact of air conditioning...

Jul 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] More AC means billions of tons of increased carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere Lucas Davis, The Conversation  VIA SALON.COM This article was originally published on The Conversation. With a heat wave pushing the heat index well above 100°F (38°C) through much of the United States, most of us are happy to stay indoors and crank the air conditioning. And if you think it’s hot here, try 124°F in India. Globally, 2016 is poised to be another record-breaking year for average temperatures. This means more air conditioning. Much more. In a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), Paul Gertler and I examine the enormous global potential for air conditioning. As incomes rise around the world and global temperatures go up, people are buying air conditioners at alarming rates....

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An Oil Pipeline Nearly As Long As Keystone XL Has Been Fully Approved...

Jul 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Nati Harnik Pipes for the proposed Dakota Access oil pipeline, that would stretch from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to Patoka, Ill., are stacked Saturday, May 9, 2015, at a staging area in Worthing, S.D. The proposed oil pipeline will traverse North and South Dakota, Iowa and Illinois. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)   Despite several months of heavy opposition, an oil pipeline slated to cut through four Midwestern states has all the regulatory permits it needs for full build-out. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers gave the final blessing to the Dakota Access pipeline on Tuesday. Developers now have the last set of permits they need to build through the small portion of federal land the line crosses, which includes major waterways like the...

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6 Human Activities That Pose The Biggest Threat To The World’s Drinking Water...

Jul 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling THINK PROGRES CREDIT: Shutterstock   Clean, drinkable water is more than a precious resource — it’s crucial to human life. Unfortunately, population growth and pollution are threatening to seriously undermine the availability of clean drinking water in many of the world’s major cities. According to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, water treatment costs have risen by 50 percent in a third of large cities around the world. That means that getting clean, pure drinking water to people has become an increasingly difficult task, requiring cities not only to pay for expensive treatments, but pay for the construction of treatment plants to dole out said expensive treatments. All told, the study estimated that the total cost of degradation to our drinking water —...

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Humanity’s Plunder of Nature’s Resources Is Intensifying...

Jul 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Alex Kirby / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG Landscape deeply scarred by an open-cut coal mine in Hunter Valley, Australia. (Max Phillips, Jeremy Buckingham MLC via Flickr) LONDON—Humans’ appetite for gnawing away at the fabric of the Earth itself is growing prodigiously. According to a new UN report, the amount of the planet’s natural resources extracted for human use has tripled in 40 years. A report produced by the International Resource Panel (IRP), part of the UN Environment Programme, says rising consumption driven by a growing middle class has seen resources extraction increase from 22 billion tonnes in 1970 to 70 billon tonnes in 2010. It refers to natural resources as primary materials, and includes under this heading biomass, fossil fuels, metal ores and non-metallic minerals. The increase in their use, the...

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