An Oil Pipeline Nearly As Long As Keystone XL Has Been Fully Approved...

Jul 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Nati Harnik Pipes for the proposed Dakota Access oil pipeline, that would stretch from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to Patoka, Ill., are stacked Saturday, May 9, 2015, at a staging area in Worthing, S.D. The proposed oil pipeline will traverse North and South Dakota, Iowa and Illinois. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)   Despite several months of heavy opposition, an oil pipeline slated to cut through four Midwestern states has all the regulatory permits it needs for full build-out. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers gave the final blessing to the Dakota Access pipeline on Tuesday. Developers now have the last set of permits they need to build through the small portion of federal land the line crosses, which includes major waterways like the...

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6 Human Activities That Pose The Biggest Threat To The World’s Drinking Water...

Jul 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling THINK PROGRES CREDIT: Shutterstock   Clean, drinkable water is more than a precious resource — it’s crucial to human life. Unfortunately, population growth and pollution are threatening to seriously undermine the availability of clean drinking water in many of the world’s major cities. According to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, water treatment costs have risen by 50 percent in a third of large cities around the world. That means that getting clean, pure drinking water to people has become an increasingly difficult task, requiring cities not only to pay for expensive treatments, but pay for the construction of treatment plants to dole out said expensive treatments. All told, the study estimated that the total cost of degradation to our drinking water —...

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Humanity’s Plunder of Nature’s Resources Is Intensifying...

Jul 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Alex Kirby / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG Landscape deeply scarred by an open-cut coal mine in Hunter Valley, Australia. (Max Phillips, Jeremy Buckingham MLC via Flickr) LONDON—Humans’ appetite for gnawing away at the fabric of the Earth itself is growing prodigiously. According to a new UN report, the amount of the planet’s natural resources extracted for human use has tripled in 40 years. A report produced by the International Resource Panel (IRP), part of the UN Environment Programme, says rising consumption driven by a growing middle class has seen resources extraction increase from 22 billion tonnes in 1970 to 70 billon tonnes in 2010. It refers to natural resources as primary materials, and includes under this heading biomass, fossil fuels, metal ores and non-metallic minerals. The increase in their use, the...

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Democratic Platform Calls For WWII-Scale Mobilization To Solve Climate Crisis...

Jul 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Mark Stehle/Invision for NRG/AP Images Micro-wind turbines and solar panels installed at Lincoln Financial Field generate renewable energy during NRG Home’s 2nd Annual Media Charity Flag Football Game in Philadelphia Wednesday, November 19, 2014.   This month, the full Democratic Platform Committee approved the strongest statement about the urgent need for climate action ever issued by a major party in this country. The platform makes for the starkest possible contrast with a party that just nominated Donald Trump — a man who has called climate change a hoax invented by and for the Chinese, who has denied basic reality such as the drought in California, and who has vowed to (try to) scuttle the unanimous agreement by the world’s nations in Paris to take whatever measures are...

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Droughts Dry Up Amazon’s ‘Green Lungs’...

Jul 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Tim Radford / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     A reduction of the Amazon rainforest’s canopy is contributing to climate change. (Phil Blackburn via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Researchers have confirmed once again that if the Amazon rainforest is one of the planet’s “green lungs”, it may be running short of breath. Repeated drought and tree loss mean that there is increasing risk that the forest may one day cease to be a “sink” for atmospheric carbon released by the combustion of fossil fuels. But even as climate scientists shake their heads in distress, plant taxonomists may be holding their heads in despair. They have just been told that so rich and various are the trees of the great Brazilian rainforest that another three centuries may...

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How an Indigenous Community Is Boosting Crop Productivity While Conserving the Rainforest (Video)...

Jul 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment “We are reforesting and restoring the land so that our grandchildren and our children have a future.” By Laura Jamison / Rainforest Alliance   VIA ALTERNET naranjilla fruit Photo Credit: Rainforest Alliance In the Napo province of Ecuador, the Kichwa people have been cultivating naranjilla—a citrus fruit that looks like a tomato but tastes like a blend of lime and rhubarb—and selling it informally in markets across the country for many years. In fact, naranjilla production has been the primary cash crop for indigenous Kichwa communities in the Hatun Sumaco parish. Unfortunately, naranjilla has also been the primary driver of deforestation in the area—and thus directly contributing to climate change. Without direct access to markets, the Kichwa had traditionally sold their harvests to middlemen, who promoted dangerous quantities of highly toxic, red-listed pesticides...

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Climate Change, Bats, And Zika: 2016’s Weirdest Relationship...

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha PageCLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock A worker fogs a residential neighborhood with insecticides to kill mosquitoes.   Particularly if you live in the Northeast, you might notice that it is really hot out. And buggy. Much of the United States has gotten a lot of rain this summer, too, providing breeding ground for mosquitoes. At some point, it’s expected that some of these mosquitoes could start carrying the Zika virus. Zika’s outbreak, which started last fall in Brazil, has caused at least three infants in the United States — and thousands across South and Central America — to be born with microencephaly, a defect characterized by incomplete growth of the head and brain, and which is linked to many health complications. Understandably, people are worried. The House of Representatives recently passed a...

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PLEDGES MADE AT PARIS CLIMATE TALKS WILL NOT CONTAIN GLOBAL WARMING...

Jul 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     The agreement at the Paris climate conference was signed by 195 nations. (jmdigne via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—National promises made late last year to contain carbon dioxide emissions will not be nearly enough to meet the global warming target agreed last December by 195 nations, according to a new assessment. The signatories to the historic agreement at the UN conference on climate change in Paris pledged to limit global warming to below 2°C and to aim for no more than 1.5°C rise above pre-industrial levels. The planet has already warmed by 1°C in the last century. But, climate scientists say, the intended nationally determined contributions (INDCs) submitted before the meeting imply global warming of between 2.6°C and...

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WHILE THE SPOTLIGHT WAS ON OFFSHORE DRILLING, FRACKING QUIETLY MADE ITS WAY INTO OUR OCEANS...

Jul 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Samantha Page climate progress CREDIT: AP Photo/Patrick Semansky Vessels assist in the drilling of the Deepwater Horizon relief well on the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana at sunset. The BP leak, the worst-ever in offshore U.S. waters, occurred at a well that the company was in the process of temporarily closing. The accident killed 11 workers and spilled up to 172 million gallons of oil.   The Gulf of Mexico has been struggling with the pollution from offshore oil drilling for a long time, a struggle that was dramatically highlighted by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill six years ago. But now it has come to light that the oil industry is conducting offshore fracking in the Gulf, which is even more dangerous than conventional oil drilling, according...

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‘Guacamole-Thick’ Algae Takes Over Florida’s Atlantic Coast, 4 Counties Declare State of Emergency...

Jul 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment Residents have described the foul-smelling algae as “god-awful” and “a festering infected creepy mess.” By Lorraine Chow / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: instagram @ocean_allison Waterways and beaches along Florida’s Atlantic coast have been taken over by thick, blue-green algae blooms, prompting Florida Gov. Rick Scott to declare local states of emergency in St. Lucie, Martin, Palm Beach and Lee counties. Residents have described the foul-smelling algae as “guacamole-thick,” “god-awful” and “a festering infected creepy mess.” One resident has complained of health problems, telling Reuters, “It is affecting all of us as far as red eyes, runny nose and the ‘in the throat’ feeling.” Foul smelling green algae blooms have invaded Florida’s waterways. #green #algae #Florida #treasurecoast #algaebloom #treasurecoast A photo posted by Carbonated.TV (@carbonated.tv) on Jul 1, 2016 at 6:04am PDT “It’s heartbreaking...

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JUST FIVE COMMON FOODS PRODUCE MORE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS THAN NEARLY ALL COUNTRIES...

Jun 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Natasha Geiling GRIST CREDIT: AP Photo/J.D. Pooley, File Think about the last time you ate something that included wheat, soy, corn, rice, or palm oil. As some of the most common commodity crops in the world, it’s likely that your last meal contained at least one of these ingredients, even if you weren’t aware of it. Palm oil can hide in things like sandwich bread or pizza dough, while soy can find its way into everything from cereal to canned soups. That means that, knowingly or not, your last meal probably helped contribute to the greenhouse gas pollution that is driving global climate change. According to a new report from Oxfam America, the production of these five commodity crops emits more greenhouse gases annually than each of the world’s countries, save...

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SANDERS AND CLINTON TEAMS FIGHT OVER CLIMATE LANGUAGE IN DEMOCRATIC PLATFORM...

Jun 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] REUTERS/Jim Young Walking the plank By Ben Adler GRIST The Democratic Party’s platform drafting committee has written a stronger climate change section than the platform had in 2012, but it also rejected a series of more ambitious climate and energy amendments on Friday. That’s raised the ire of Bernie Sanders and his appointees to the drafting committee, like climate activist and author Bill McKibben. The first draft of the platform, voted on by the 15-member drafting committee, is now complete, though it hasn’t been made publicly available. On July 8 and 9, in Orlando, the full 187-member platform committee will meet and debate further changes before approving and sending its draft on to the party convention, to be held in Philadelphia the last week of July. Sanders slammed Hillary Clinton’s committee appointees for...

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SEE HOW THE SIERRA CLUB’S LEADER IS TROLLING REPUBLICANS...

Jun 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  GRIST Sierra Club By Rebecca Leber The head of the Sierra Club is having some fun trolling the GOP.The Republican National Committee reportedly can’t find enough willing speakers to fill time at its convention in Cleveland a few weeks away. Politicians like Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) have refused the spotlight because they think the party’s presidential nominee, Donald Trump, is toxic. So Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, emailed RNC chair Reince Priebus on Wednesday and generously offered to step in during the party’s time of need. “I heard that you are having trouble finding speakers for the Republican National Convention in Cleveland,” Brune writes in his email. “Don’t worry — I’m here to help. I’d be happy to take the stage at the Republican National Convention, and discuss the future of energy...

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ANOTHER CORPORATION SUING OUR GOVERNMENT THANKS TO TRADE AGREEMENTS...

Jun 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Dave Johnson  CAMPAIGN FOR AMERICA‘S FUTURE A Canadian corporation is suing the us because we wouldn’t let them build a pipeline across our country (seizing people’s property along the way) so they could sell oil to China. They can do this because we signed a trade agreement that places corporate rights above our democracy. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) would increase by an order of magnitude the companies that can sue us for hurting their profits by protecting the environment, consumers, public health and small businesses. Because They Can TransCanada Corporation is suing the U.S. government (us) for $15 billion in damages under North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) rules. The company wanted to build the Keystone pipeline all the way from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico so they could ship oil to...

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NATION’S FIRST SOLAR ROADWAY COMING TO HISTORIC ROUTE 66...

Jun 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] LORRAINE CHOW OF ECOWATCH ON BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT (Photo: US Bureau of Land Management)Article reprinted with permission from EcoWatch Missouri’s Department of Transportation (MoDOT) has announced plans to install solar panels at a rest stop alongside the iconic Route 66 as part of the department’s “Road to Tomorrow Initiative.” The Historic Route 66 welcome center in Conway, Missouri will receive the nation’s first solar roadway panels on a public right of way. “… part of why we picked this location is because of the the historic Route 66 concept,” Laurel McKean, MoDot assistant district engineer, told KY3. “You know, here’s one of the main roadways that’s iconic for the United States, and being able to use the history to create potentially the future.” The panels were developed by Solar Roadways, an Idaho-based startup founded by Scott and Julie Brusaw. Their...

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HOLY CRAP … THE TREES ON YOUR BLOCK ARE WORTH HOW MUCH MONEY?!...

Jun 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Scientists just showed that money really does grow on trees. Clayton Aldern   MOTHER JONES Sheila Fitzgerald/Shutterstock This story originally appeared on Grist and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. It’s not easy to price a tree, but a group of researchers from the US Forest Service and UC Davis have tried to do exactly that. Working with a dataset of about 900,000 trees that line California’s public streets, the group sought to place a dollar value on the services those trees perform, which include “energy savings, carbon storage, air pollutant uptake, and rainfall interception.” Trees lining California’s public streets contribute about $1 billion annually to the state’s economy—nearly $111 per tree. All told, the researchers estimate the trees contribute about $1 billion annually—nearly $111 per tree for each of the state’s 9.1 million street trees....

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IT’S REALLY HARD TO DEAL WITH CLIMATE CHANGE. A NEW PODCAST TALKS IT OUT....

Jun 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock Hot Mic By Grist staff A podcast about our warming planet from some of the nation’s best-known climate commentators? To quote the God of Mischief (patron deity of both Grist and teen girls): “Well, I guess that’s worth a look.” Or in this case, a listen. In the first episode of “Warm Regards,” meteorologist and Slate writer Eric Holthaus, paleoecologist Jacquelyn Gill, and New York Times columnist Andy Revkin talk about one of our favorite subjects here at Grist: how to talk about climate change. Holthaus starts out with the confession that he’s terrified by global warming, and his co-hosts chime in on how they, too, came to fear the carbon-pocalypse. But how do you discuss the problem in a way that inspires action instead of terror? Take a listen to find...

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FOSSIL FUEL COMPANIES IMPOSE MORE IN CLIMATE COSTS THAN THEY MAKE IN PROFITS...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]  by David Roberts   VOX (Shutterstock) It is fairly well understood by now that releasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere imposes an economic cost, in the form of climate change impacts. In most cases, however, those responsible for carbon emissions are not required to pay that cost. Instead, it’s borne mainly by the world’s poor and low-lying countries, and of course by future generations, as many of the worst impacts of climate change will emerge years after the emissions that drive them. People sometimes refer to the unpaid cost of carbon pollution as a subsidy, or an “implicit subsidy,” to polluting businesses. The IMF recently issued a report saying that total worldwide subsidies to energy, mainly fossil fuel energy, amounted to $5.2 trillion a year. The reason that number is...

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THE NEW LANDSCAPE DECLARATION: PERSPECTIVE AND CRITIQUE (PART 2)...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Dirt Contributo New Landscape Declaration / LAF The second day of the Landscape Architecture Foundation‘s New Landscape Declaration:  Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future offered critical responses to the 23 declarations delivered on the first day of the event and looked ahead to the next 50 years. Afternoon sessions were divided into five panels, each representing a different aspect of landscape architecture: academic practice, private practice, public practice, capacity building organizations, and emerging voices. Each panelist gave a short talk before engaging in a group discussion, addressing audience-sourced questions, and offering perspectives on what needs to be achieved over the next 50 years: Academic practice: Maintain the value of the “long view” “Academics combine teaching, scholarship, and service” while “taking the long view: looking back, then to now, and forward,” argued...

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THOUSANDS OF CITIES FROM SIX CONTINENTS JUST AGREED TO WORK ON CLIMATE CHANGE...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Stephane de Sakutin/Pool Photo via AP   Thousands of cities from six continents united Wednesday to create the largest global coalition committed to battling human-caused climate change and pushing the world into a low-carbon economy. The Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy unifies 7,100 cities encompassing more than half a billion people, the group said in a statement. Created some six months after the Paris accord, this global alliance aims for greater collaboration between cities and increased funding to support sustainable energy development. As more than half the world’s population lives in urban areas, cities are now major generators of greenhouse gas emissions. About 75 percent of global CO2 emissions come from cities, and most of those emissions are attributed to transportation and...

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THE MAJORITY OF WEST VIRGINIA IS UNDER A STATE OF EMERGENCY AFTER FLOODS DEVASTATE THE STATE...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Justin Michaels/The Weather Channel Flooding in White Sulfur Springs, WV. Forty-four of West Virginia’s 55 counties are under a state of emergency as severe weather and devastating floods have killed at least 14 residents and left hundreds of thousands without power. A spokesperson for West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin told ABC News that the floods, in some areas, had the potential to be “the worst in 100 years.” Severe rain and thunderstorms battered West Virginia for most of Thursday, leaving some parts of the state inaccessible due to damaged roads and infrastructure. At least four residents have died as a result of the floods, including an eight-year old boy who was swept away by flash flooding. A second toddler, between two and four years old,...

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RACE IS ON TO FEED A WARMING WORLD...

Jun 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Millions throughout Africa depend on maize, but new crop varieties can barely keep pace with the warming climate. (Kate Holt / AusAID via Wikimedia Commons) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—It can take up to 30 years to improve a crop variety, test it and persuade farmers to adopt it. That means the speed of climate change in Africa could make a new variety of maize useless even before the first harvest, according to new research. But two separate studies that address the challenge of food security in a rapidly warming world suggest that the answers may lie not just in future weather but in today’s soils. One says that better soil data can be used to predict...

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CLIMATE CHANGE, FOSSIL FUELS ARE HURTING OUR KIDS...

Jun 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Children under 5 bear the brunt of disease and problems from climate change and fossil-fuel combustion. It’s time to do something about it. By Frederica Perera | BILL MOYERS.COM A child in an area affected by a drought in the southern outskirts of Tegucigalpa on April 22, 2016. (Photo by Orlando Sierra/AFP/Getty Images) This post originally appeared at Environmental Health News. Editor’s note: The following opinion piece written for EHN accompanies Perera’s commentary on fossil fuels and children’s health published June 21 in the Environmental Health Perspectives journal.  Children suffer the most from fossil-fuel burning. Fossil-fuel combustion and associated air pollution and carbon dioxide (CO2) is the root cause of much of children’s ill health today, as well as their uncertain future. There are strong scientific arguments, as well persuasive economic ones,...

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NEIL DE GRASSE TYSON AND AL GORES EXPLORE CLIMATE CHANGE, LIFE IN A NAVAL OBSERVATORY AND MORE...

Jun 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Andrew C. Revkin   NY TIMES   Former Vice President Al Gore discussed climate change science and activism on Neil deGrasse Tyson’s StarTalk program.Credit StarTalk/ Laura Berland Earlier this year, the astrophysicist and science-literacy evangelist Neil deGrasse Tyson recorded a conversation for his Star Talk Radio program with former Vice President Al Gore exploring Gore’s decades-long campaign for action to stem climate change, what it’s like to live in the United States Naval Observatory (the official vice presidential residence), the path from the vice president’s “GoreSat” vision in 1998 to the functioning Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite, and more. Tyson then invited me into the studio to discuss Gore’s career and comments, along with his smartly comedic co-host, Maeve Higgins. The topics included paths to a world with abundant clean energy, Gore’s thoughts on trends in...

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26 MILLION TREES DIED IN CALIFORNIA IN JUST ONE YEAR...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The mortality rate is unprecedented and will fuel the state’s fire season. Sequoia National Park. (Photo: USFS Region 5/Flickr) TAKE PART DAILY Taylor Hill The number of dead trees in California’s forests dramatically increased in just one year’s time. The latest survey from the United States Forest Service revealed that an additional 26 million trees have succumbed to drought, a devastating bark beetle infestation, and hotter temperatures in 2015. That brings the number of trees that have died in the Sierra Nevada to 66 million since 2010. For a state already in the throes of fire season, the discovery of a 65 percent increase in the number of dead trees within its forests is a troubling sign. “These new numbers really show that the tree die-off is spreading at an astronomical rate,” said...

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THE PUBLIC SPACES OF THE FUTURE: UP FOR NEGOTIATION...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Dirt Contributor Demo:Polis / Carolina Leite The jury is in. Over the next fifty years, the world’s cities will face unprecedented stresses from a changing climate, growing populations, and issues of security, resource scarcity, and civil unrest. In the design professions, we like to think our work can help resolve these issues. In the U.S., over the past century, we have debated the role of public space to ease the challenges faced within our urban environment. This conversation will not end anytime soon, nor should it. However, if we continue to place our trust and faith in urban public spaces we must re-examine two fundamental questions: how will we define success within these spaces, and who will we allow to shape them? Demo:Polis, an exhibition at the Akademie der Künste in Berlin,...

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EUROPE’S PRECIOUS BEECH FORESTS COULD SUCCUMB TO DROUGHT...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Kieran Cooke / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     A beech woods near Morganstown in South Wales, where tree growth rates are still affected by a drought 50 years ago. (Ben Salter via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Sunlight angling its way through the light green leaves of lines of beech trees is one of the most haunting features of the European spring. But new research shows that beech forests across Europe are vulnerable to changes in climate—in particular, to the effects of prolonged dry spells. At most risk of sudden and widespread reduced growth are beech forests in the south of the UK, an area where the species is at its most profuse. Scientists from the University of Stirling in Scotland report in Global Change...

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The Scale of Global Wildlife Crime Is Massive, Reveals Shocking New Report...

Jun 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment The United Nations’ first-ever World Wildlife Crime Report reveals broad corruption facilitating illegal trade in plants and animals. By Apoorva Joshi / Mongabay   VIA ALTERNET Ivory Crush Event Photo Credit: italy.usembassy.gov The report was produced by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime using data on thousands of species and seizures from more than 120 countries. It found that trafficking is faciliated by widespread corruption at many levels of government and society, and that crimes are generally not restricted to certain countries. To better fight wildlife crime, officials urge a stepping-up of enforcement and monitoring, as well as increased transnational cooperation. Wildlife trafficking is a global problem, revealed the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) in their first-ever World Wildlife Crime Report. Released late last month, the report finds, among...

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DUCKS ARE SHOWING US HOW THE PACIFIC OCEAN IS CHANGING...

Jun 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] 16 By Tim Radford / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     A spectacled eider duck in flight off the coast of Alaska. (Dominic Sherony via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Climate change may be starting to affect the marine ecosystems in the coldest parts of the North Pacific and the Arctic Circle. And the people who can monitor what’s happening are ornithologists. They watch what the eider ducks—truly ducks, but sea-going—do in the moulting season. Since the ducks need to feed, and the late summer moult is stressful, where they choose to float in the water is as good a guide as any to where the molluscs are. Matt Sexson, a wildlife biologist at the US Geological Survey’s Alaska Science Centre, and colleagues report in The Condor: Ornithological...

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WILDLIFE NEEDS NEW CORRIDORS TO ESCAPE RISING HEAT...

Jun 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Tim Radford / Climate News Network   VIA TRUTHDIG     An otter tries to cross a road. Hard times are ahead for species that can find no safe passage to habitat. (Mandcrobertson via Wikimedia Commons) The piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—US scientists worried about what global warming and climate change may do to wildlife have come up with the ultimate in creature-friendly versions of road maps or highway patrols. They want to see natural corridors that link safe habitats and ecosystems, so that as conditions change, plants and animals—and the continental US is home to 800 species of bird, more than 400 kinds of mammal and more than 600 reptiles and amphibians—get a chance to migrate. And, they report, only 2% of the eastern US offers the climate connectivity—their word...

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