LONG BEACH FILES LAWSUIT AGAINST MONSANTO...

May 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TRUTHDIG posted by emma niles   The Port of Long Beach. (via Flickr) Following the lead of six other West Coast cities, the city of Long Beach on Thursday filed paperwork to sue Monsanto, alleging that the agrochemical giant is responsible for chemical contamination of its water sources, including the Port of Long Beach. The Long Beach Post reports: According to the complaint, PCBs find their way to Long Beach waters when they leach, leak, off-gas and escape their intended applications, causing runoff during naturally occurring storm and rain events, after being released into the environment. … The city said it continues to “incur significant costs related to PCBs in its storm water and the sedimentary deposits in the Port of Long Beach and adjacent ocean floor areas,” according to a release. In...

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THE BIG ISSUE CALIFORNIANS ARE NOT HEARING ABOUT THIS ELECTION YEAR...

May 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Bill Boyarsky  TRUTHDIG   An aerial view of downtown Malibu, Calif., and surrounding neighborhoods. (Doc Searls/CC BY-SA 2.0) California’s size and complexity make it easy to hide some of the real forces shaping the state this election year. Sure, California is deep blue, with Democrats in control of all offices. But don’t be misled. The most powerful force in the state—business—isn’t hung up on party labels. No matter what the color of California on the electoral map, there’s green to be made by business in shaping the laws of the Golden State. The difference between the surface show of politics and what goes on in the backrooms has always intrigued me. Although I enjoy covering the glamour of big campaigns, I know the real story is often found among the lobbyists and...

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INSIDE THE LOOMING DISASTER OF THE SALTON SEA...

May 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Alejandro Davila Fragoso CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Alejandro Davila Fragoso Dead tilapia lines the shores of the Salton Sea, California’s largest lake. Located in Imperial County, the manmade Salton Sea is drying up fast, threatening the fate of fish, migratory bird species and even public health as exposed playa will create dust bowls, harming an area known for high asthma rates and high levels of air pollution.   BOMBAY BEACH, CALIFORNIA — The lake is drying up, uncounted dead fish line the shore, and the desert town is losing people. It could be the plot of a post-apocalyptic movie set in the future, but this is actually happening here and it has been going on for years. It wasn’t always like this, of course. There was a time when this town was...

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THOUSANDS OF UNDOCUMENTED KIDS CAN NOW ENROLL IN HEALTH CARE COVERAGE...

May 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Esther Yu-Hsi Lee THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli State Sen. Ricardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens, speaks at a rally where health care and immigrant rights advocates celebrated the expansion of Medi-Cal to children and teens illegally brought to the United States, held at the Capitol Monday, May 16, 2016, in Sacramento, Calif.   This week, more than 170,000 undocumented children became eligible to enroll in state-funded health insurance plans in California, going beyond Obamacare to allow more immigrants to have access to comprehensive health services for the first time in the state. The “Health4AllKids” health care expansion allows low-income children under the age of 19 to receive affordable care under Medi-Cal, the name for California’s Medicaid program, regardless of their immigration status. This will allow undocumented kids to access the full scope...

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N.Y. LAW PROFESSOR ADDRESS U.N. ON GOVERNMENT VACCINE POLICIES VIOLATING NUREMBERG CODE...

May 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Law Professor Mary Holland addressing the U.N. regarding civil rights related to government vaccine policies. Comments by Brian Shilhavy Health Impact News Editor New York University research scholar and law professor Mary Holland recently addressed the United Nations at the 25th International Health and Environment Conference. Professor Holland has been one of the lone voices in the U.S. addressing the legal ramifications of removing parental rights to informed consent for childhood vaccines.  She has previously written for Health Impact News on this issue. See: Killing the Messenger: U.S. Vaccine Law and Policy Professor Holland sees major civil rights issues involved in government vaccine policies that remove  informed consent rights to refuse mandatory vaccinations. She reminds the United Nations that history has shown us the results of such overt government intrusion into personal medical...

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THE STAND AGAINST FORCED VACCINATION ACROSS THE STATES AND THE NVIC ADVOCACY PORTAL...

May 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Dawn Richardson, NVIC Director of Advocacy In 2015, state legislatures across the United States experienced an unprecedented flood of bills backed by the pharmaceutical and medical trade industries to restrict or remove personal belief vaccine exemptions, expand electronic vaccine tracking systems, and require more vaccines for children in school and adults in the workplace. The web-based NVIC Advocacy Portal, which was launched in 2010 to protect and expand the right to exercise informed consent to vaccination, was utilized more in 2015 than in any other previous year. NVIC’s Advocacy program tracked 160 bills across 41 states and four national bills in 2015! The NVIC Advocacy Portal is a free online communications network that connects registered users with their legislators through their smart phones, tablets and computers. Through the Portal, NVIC’s advocacy...

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Monsanto’s Controversial Glyphosate Herbicide Is Being Sprayed in New York, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle and Portland...

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment The herbicide was classified as “probably carcinogenic to humans” by the World Health Organization. By Lorraine Chow / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET Man in a protective suit spraying plants against pests, Disinfection, photography Photo Credit: overcrew/Shutterstock Reverend Billy and The Stop Shopping Choir have published two new interactive maps showing where glyphosate is being sprayed in California’s Bay Area and Portland. Based on the maps, glyphosate—the cancer-linked main ingredient in Monsanto’s weedkiller Roundup—is being used in a number of public spaces including parks and playgrounds in both cities. According to a press release sent to EcoWatch, the Portland map displays 1,592 locations in the city where herbicides containing glyphosate are being sprayed. “Monsanto’s Roundup and its key ingredient glyphosate are major weapons in the Portland Parks Department’s arsenal of herbicides,” the release states. A Care2 petition has been posted to...

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THIS PROGRAM WILL MAKE CUTTING CARBON EMISSIONS LUCRATIVE FOR FARMERS...

Mar 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Mark Isbell   When Mark Isbell, a third-generation rice farmer in central Arkansas, tallies up his profits for this year, he’ll count a few extra dollars from a unique source: the greenhouse gases that his 3,200-acre farm didn’t emit. Isbell is part of a small group of farmers participating in a new project piloted by the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), in conjunction with the USDA, and approved by the American Carbon Registry. The program encourages rice farmers in California and the Mid-South to adopt a series of greenhouse-gas mitigating practices on their fields by allowing them to cash in on the carbon emissions that they offset using California’s carbon market. “You always have to be looking forward,” Isbell told ThinkProgress. “It seems like this is the...

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Why Southern California’s New Cloud Seeding Project Is Putting Conspiracy Theorists into a Frenzy...

Mar 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment Five years into a crippling drought, Los Angeles County is trying to make it rain. Skeptics believe something much more nefarious is going on. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet   Lightning storm over city in purple light Photo Credit: Vasin Lee/Shutterstock California got a brief respite from its historic drought, thanks to a recent wave of storms that swept across the West Coast, filling reservoirs and replenishing snowpack. Grateful residents don’t just have El Niño to thank: Part of the rainfall was, in fact, man-made. But there are some who believe that something more sinister may be afoot. Mother Nature gets a boost from science Now suffering through its fifth year of a crippling drought, the Golden State was done waiting for Mother Nature to do her thing, so officials and...

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The West Coast Is the World’s 5th Largest Economy. Can It Unite to Stop Big Oil?...

Mar 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   From First Nations activism to innovative city initiatives, the West Coast is leading the fight against global warming even as many countries lag behind. By Arun Gupta / YES! Magazine   VIA ALTERNET Oil and gas well silhouette in remote rural area, profiled on sunset sky Photo Credit: Calin Tatu Rex Parris, the three-term Republican mayor of Lancaster, California, is no squishy liberal. “I believe when you walk out the door of your home, you should be safe. I think capitalism is the best economic system we have available, and the United States should have the strongest military in the world.” But when it comes to climate change, Parris calls it “the greatest threat facing the human race since the beginning of time.” He’s a rarity in a party in which nearly all...

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UTILITIES, SOLAR ENERGY AND THE FIGHT FOR YOUR ROOF...

Mar 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] HUFFNGTON POST GREEN Blend Images – Dave and Les Jacobs via Getty Images Seth Blumsack, Pennsylvania State University Solar power in suburbia: what’s not to like? Gray Watson, CC BY-SA By many accounts, the spread of solar power is unstoppable. Costs continue to fall at a blistering pace, solutions to give consumers a solar-powered home without needing to connect to the grid for back-up power are emerging, and even the U.S. Supreme Court has weighed in, with a recent ruling that is favorable for the solar energy market. Seen another way, though, solar power is seeing serious threats. Predictions from even last year were that solar energy would soon match the price of electricity from utilities — known as “grid parity” in the business. But the plummeting cost of natural gas, which has...

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CALIFORNIA MOVES FORWARD WITH DRILLING IN PROTECTED AQUIFIERS...

Feb 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File California has both water and oil underground. Which is worth more?   A California regulator is asking the EPA to officially allow oil drilling and wastewater disposal in a protected aquifer near San Luis Obispo. The request is the first of dozens the state is expected to make, after revelations surfaced that the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources had, for years, improperly issued permits to inject wastewater into underground basins protected by the Clean Water Act. The California Water Board has signed off on its sister agency’s request, saying that the aquifer is separated from local drinking water sources by an “impermeable barrier.” But residents and environmentalists are skeptical. Californians have good reason to be skeptical that the division, known...

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Exxon is Flooding the World with Fossil Fuels that Could Destroy Life As We Know It...

Feb 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Exxon’s never-ending big dig. By Bill McKibben / Tom Dispatch Photo Credit: Kamonrat/Shutterstock.com Here’s the story so far. We have the chief legal representatives of the eighth and 16th largest economies on Earth (California and New York) probing the biggest fossil fuel company on Earth (ExxonMobil), while both Democratic presidential candidates are demanding that the federal Department of Justice join the investigation of what may prove to be one of the biggest corporate scandals in American history.  And that’s just the beginning.  As bad as Exxon has been in the past, what it’s doing now — entirely legally — is helping push the planet over the edge and into the biggest crisis in the entire span of the human story. Back in the fall, you might have heard something about how Exxon...

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Chris Hedges: How One City Is Revolting Against Corporate Takeover...

Feb 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Investigations Chris Hedges investigates the ways in which a radical city councilman and a civil rights attorney counteract the takeover of Salinas, CA by a multi-million dollar industry. By Chris Hedges / The Real News Network Photo Credit: teleSUR/Days of Revolt Editor’s note: This epidosode agricultural corporations, in particular in Salinas, California and their effect on communities and grassroots democratic movements with host Chris Hedges, Jose Castaneda, an independent radical city councilperson and Anthony Prince, an attorney who has been working with groups in Salinas to fight back against the power of big business. WATCH: The full segment below: HEDGES: So, Jose, let’s begin by talking about what’s happened in your city. You are home to some of the largest agricultural corporations, not only in the country but in the world. JOSE CASTANEDA:...

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OBAMA DESIGNATES THREE NEW NATIONAL MONUMENTS IN THE CALIFORNIA DESERT...

Feb 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Jenny Rowland — Guest Contributor CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Patrick Donnelly Mojave Trails  This move will preserve over 1.8 million acres of land as monuments, helping to safeguard wildlife and communities from climate change and guaranteeing continued public access to these places for generations to come. “The California desert is a cherished and irreplaceable resource for the people of southern California,” said Interior Secretary Sally Jewell in a statement. “It is an oasis of nature’s quiet beauty just outside two of our nation’s largest metropolitan areas.” Mojave Trails, Sand to Snow, and Castle Mountains are the 20th, 21st, and 22nd national monuments that have been created or expanded under President Obama, adding up to a total of 3.5 million acres of new protections for public lands. Both Democratic and Republican presidents have used...

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THE SEVEN CHARTS YOU NEED TO FATHOM CALIFORNIA’S WATER PROSPECTS...

Jan 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Nathanael Johnson   GRIST It’s finally raining in California — just when we’d begun to think that it would never rain again. But the state is deep in water debt. Traditionally, California has depended on snowmelt for about a third of its water. The recent storms have gotten California’s snowpack up to slightly above average for this time of year, but it’s going to take a lot more than that to refill reservoirs. First the good news: Snow! Compare the current snowpack (above) to this time last year. Why are we seeing more snow? Well, it got colder and wetter. Last year, average minimum temperature in the Sierra Nevada mountains was 32.1 degrees, which meant it just wasn’t cold enough to snow in most places. “Temperatures are getting warmer every year,” said Doug Carlson, an information officer...

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Godzilla El Niño drenching California exacerbated by potent MJO climatic phenomenon...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment by Julie M. Rodriguez   INHABITAT Meteorologists have been warning the public for months that this year’s El Niño would likely be one of the strongest on record, and the recent wave of storms flooding California has so far proven that to be true. But what you probably haven’t heard in the news is that El Niño isn’t the only climate phenomenon at work — the heavy winter weather is also getting a boost from the less well-known Madden-Julian Oscillation, or MJO. If you’ve never heard of the MJO before, you’re not alone. It’s a cycle of tropical winds and rain that moves between the Indian and Pacific oceans every 30-60 days, usually resulting in heavier rain and snow along the West Coast during winter. When combined with the El Niño phenomenon, this...

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CALIFORNIA’S NEW $1 BILLION DESALINATION PLANT PRODUCES 50 MILLIONS GALLONS OF WATER A DAY...

Dec 17, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   by Cat DiStasio   INHABITAT After 20 years of planning, the Claude “Bud” Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant began operations on Monday, churning out 50 million gallons of drinkable water each day. The plant takes in 100 million gallons of seawater a day from the adjacent Agua Hedionda Lagoon and puts it through a multiphasic process to remove particulates and impurities before using reverse osmosis to create fresh drinking water. The concentrated brine leftover is then diluted with seawater and piped back out to sea. The massive $1 billion public-private project was designed with energy efficiency in mind, but some critics continue to oppose the plant for its yet unknown environmental impact. The largest desalination project in the Western Hemisphere is a partnership between Poseidon Water and the San Diego County Water Authority, and was...

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OIL GROUPS PAID $10 MILLION, AND ALL THEY GOT WAS A 20-YEAR PASS TO FRACK THIS COUNTRY...

Dec 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Tracie Cone In this Dec. 18, 2012 photo, one of the region’s thousands of oil pumps sits in the foreground of the new Westside Parkway under construction in Bakersfield, Calif. Much of the economic boom Bakersfield is enjoying is because high oil prices and new technology for extraction have revived the $10 billion industry that seemed dried up 25 years ago when Kern County set out to diversify its economy and expand its tax base.   Kern County, California, where 95 percent of the state’s fracking takes place, is getting sued over a recent decision that did away with public notice and environmental review for oil and gas permits for the next 20 years. A coalition of environmental and social justice groups filed the complaint Thursday,...

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WHAT WILL HAPPEN TO A SINKING CALIFORNIA? JUST ASK SAN LUIS OBISPO...

Dec 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]                                                                                        Shutterstock By Nathan Halverson  GRIST This story was originally published by Reveal from the Center of Investigative Reporting and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. For those wondering why California is sinking, look no further than San Luis Obispo. Not too long ago in that idyllic Central Coast city, an overdependence on groundwater became a destructive and expensive problem that today could serve as a warning to cities and counties throughout the state. In 1989, amid one of the longest droughts in California history, the city’s water supply had reached a critically low level. Officials implemented mandatory water reductions of 20 percent for businesses and their 40,000 residents. And, for the first time in San Luis Obispo’s history, it began pumping groundwater. It drilled massive water wells. By 1990, the...

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WALMART THREATENS CITY COUNCIL FOR CONSIDERING MINIMUM WAGE INCREASE...

Dec 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Bryce Covert THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Gareth Patterson Walmart CEO Doug McMillon   A California city is experiencing a tactic Walmart has become known for: threats over a minimum wage hike. The city of Desert Hot Springs, California is considering a minimum wage increase to boost residents’ incomes and therefore help attract more retailers. But the proposal has drawn the protests of the country’s largest retailer, Walmart. The ordinance that the city council will vote on Tuesday would require any large retailers — those with gross sales of $500 or more — who open in the city to pay at least $10.20 an hour starting in January, a minimum that would increase by a dollar each of the next two years and then be indexed to inflation after that. The city’s current...

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CALIFORNIA’S FIRST OFF SHORE WIND POWER PROJECT FACES ENVIRONMENTAL HEADWINDS...

Nov 21, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY The state wants more renewable energy, but environmental restrictions make getting projects off the ground difficult. The cruise liner Queen Mary 2 passes the Burbo Bank Offshore Wind Farm in the Irish Sea. (Photo: Phil Noble/Reuters) Nov 20, 2015 Editor, reporter, and radio producer Zachary Slobig has covered coastal issues for Outside, NPR, Los Angeles Times, and many others.   Pollution-free, renewable energy for some 300,000 homes could arrive on the California coast in the next decade if a new wind farm plan can navigate the contentious climate that thus far has derailed all offshore power projects in the state since 1969. Offshore wind development firm Trident Winds wants to put 100 floating wind turbines—tethered to the seafloor with a system of cables—15 miles off the coast from Morro Bay....

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GOVERNOR WRESTLES WITH HIS OWN MORTALITY, SIGNS “DEATH WITH DIGNITY” LAW...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Tara Culp-Ressler CREDIT: Shutterstock California will become the largest state to allow terminally ill residents to end their lives with the approval of a doctor, after Gov. Jerry Brown (D) added his signature to a long-awaited piece of legislation on Monday. The California legislature initially approved the so-called “right-to-die” bill more than a month ago after a contentious political campaign surrounding the measure. The Catholic Church came out in opposition to the bill, though major medical groups did not. It was unclear whether or not Brown — who is a former Jesuit seminarian — would approve the legislation. In a letter addressed to lawmakers on Monday, the governor was frank about wrestling with the decision. He said he read appeals from people on both sides of the issue, consulted a Catholic bishop,...

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MY DARK CALIFORNIA DREAM

Oct 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Credit Illustration by Mark Pernice Our­ parents had wide open spaces all around. We still had nature within reach. Now what? By DANIEL DUANE CALIFORNIA’S over, everything I love about this place is going to hell. I knew there was something familiar about this thought from the moment it occurred to me in Yosemite National Park. My sister and I started going to those mountains 40 years ago with our parents, who taught us to see the Sierra Nevada as a never-changing sanctuary in a California increasingly overrun by suburban sprawl. Once we had our own families, we indoctrinated our kids in the same joys: suffering under backpacks, drinking snowmelt from creeks, jumping into (and quickly back out of) icy lakes, and napping in wildflower meadows. Yosemite remains my personal paradise, but the...

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NET ZERO INHOUSE BOASTS WATER-SMART SOLUTIONS ESSENTIAL FOR PARCHED CALIFORNIA...

Oct 11, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Architecture by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT Stories of drought-stricken California have become sadly common, with many citizens forced to slash their water use so severely they’ve let their gardens die. Luckily, innovative architecture is proving that a water-conscious lifestyle doesn’t necessitate giving up your green thumb. Students at the California Polytechnic State University designed and built INhouse, a net-zero prototype home that’s powered by solar and integrates a smart water-recycling system that doesn’t use a drop of potable water to irrigate plants. Selected as a contender in the 2015 Solar Decathlon competition, INhouse was intelligently designed in response to the climate conditions of coastal California. The state’s hotter-than-usual temperatures inspired one of the most important features of the house: a constructed wetland system that collects all the greywater from the house before filtering and...

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CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR SIGNS AMBITIOUS RENEWABLE ENERGY BILL INTO LAW...

Oct 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha PageCLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Nick Ut California Gov. Jerry Brown speaks during the White House-organized U.S. – China Climate Leaders Summit, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015, in Los Angeles.   While a whole bunch of states are suing the EPA for regulating carbon spewing from the electricity sector, other states, such as California, are moving full-steam ahead towards renewables and carbon-cutting. Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law Wednesday that requires state-regulated utilities to get a whopping 50 percent of their electricity from renewable energy sources, such as wind, solar, and hydro, by 2030. The law also requires a 50 percent increase in energy efficiency in buildings by that year. The goals were previously laid out during Brown’s inaugural address. “This is really a very significant occasion,” Brown said at the...

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THE MOST PROFOUNDLY EVIL CRIME COMMITED BY EXXONMOBIL TO DATE...

Sep 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   JACQUELINE MARCUS FOR BUZZFLASH AT TRUTHOUT (Photo: JW Randolph)From the time I was a teenager, I’ve wrestled with the question of good and evil. The question led me to the study of philosophy and literature. When I was sixteen years old, I began reading the Russian authors, starting with Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment.   Naïve, I sided with Alyosha Karamazov, a saintly loving monk—a man who, despite the despicable things that humans do to one another, held faith in the goodness of God, and in the idea that humans are fundamentally good, but they do evil things in a state of ignorance. This idea that evil is committed in a state of ignorance goes back to Plato’s definition of wrongdoing, a concept that St. Augustine accepted, only he referred to the Higher Good...

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THE ROLLING STONE ARTICLE EVERYONE SHOULD BE TALKING ABOUT...

Sep 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by DarkScholar DAILY KOS Over the past few days, everyone has been discussing the interview in Rolling Stone where Donald Trump insults Carly Fiorina and generally just behaves like Donald Trump. However, if you read the entire magazine, you will find a far more important article by Tim Dickinson about the recent wildfires in California, Washington, and Alaska. Although it does not feature any comments about Republican candidates’ looks, it has actual relevance for the future of the United States and potentially the entire world. The article focuses on the links between climate change and this year’s disastrous wildfire season. The droughts in California mark an obvious link, but even in places such as Washington where precipitation levels have been normal, changes in weather have increased the risk of fire. My Gut Reaction:...

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California passes one weakened climate bill, wholly fails to pass a second...

Sep 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Matt Black By Clayton Aldern   GRIST Late Friday night, the California state legislature passed a new climate bill, and while it will lead to some progress, overall its passage should ring as a disappointment to environmentalists. The Clean Energy and Pollution Reduction Act, or Senate Bill 350 — an ostensibly “landmark” piece of legislation — will beef up the state’s renewable portfolio standard by requiring utilities to generate 50 percent of their electricity using renewable sources by 2030. Which shouldn’t be a problem: The state’s three major utilities have already hit 20 percent renewable generation, and this figure will continue to rise due to existing state mandates that require 33 percent renewable generation by 2020. (Thanks, Arnold!) The bill will also require a 50 percent increase in the energy efficiency of existing buildings by 2030....

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BIG OIL TANKS CALIFORNIA MEASURE TO CUT PETROLEUM USE IN HALF...

Sep 17, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] “Oil has won the skirmish. But they’ve lost the bigger battle,” pledges Gov. Jerry Brown. Kate Sheppard Senior reporter/Environment and energy editor, THE HUFFINGTON POST   Credit: Mark J. Terrill/Associated Press California lawmakers pulled a measure calling for a 50 percent reduction in oil consumption from climate legislation Wednesday night, following staunch opposition from the industry. SB 350, a bill from Senate President pro Tempore Kevin de León (D) and Sen. Mark Leno (D), included a measure to cut petroleum use in half by 2030, along with provisions to improve the efficiency of buildings by 50 percent and increase the amount of energy the state draws from renewables to 50 percent. The bill passed the state Senate this summer and is currently up for debate in the Assembly, but the oil provision faced...

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