FAILING BACKWARD

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Metropolis Magazine A new book treats the architectural failures of a radical past as a learning opportunity for an apathetic present. Anna Khachiyan Buckminster Fuller’s giant dome for Expo 67 in Montreal presents a harmonious vision of high technology nestled in nature. All images courtesy Verso “Nothing dates faster than people’s fantasies about the future,” scoffed art critic Robert Hughes in 1980, referencing Oscar Niemeyer and Lúcio Costa’s pop-up capital Brasília. The quote originally appeared in The Shock of the New, the last hurrah in a string of politically aware television documentaries on art history and visual culture that also included Kenneth Clark’s Civilization (1968) and John Berger’s Ways of Seeing (1972). So it’s fitting that it appears again in Last Futures: Nature, Technology, and the End of Architecture (Verso, 2016), by architect and writer Douglas...

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BUCKY’S BIOSPHERE GETS A FRIEND...

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Vanessa Quirk  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE All images courtesy of Dror To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, the New-York based design studio Dror has announced a proposal for the world-famous site: to give R. Buckminster Fuller’s Biosphere, which has served as a landmark monument on Montreal’s Île Sainte-Hélène for decades, a long-awaited companion. The studio has designed another dome, an 150-meter wide aluminum sphere covered by natural vegetation, that would serve as a site for festivals and events. The structure, still speculative at the moment, is meant to suggest an alternative to Parc Jean-Drapeau’s development plan and could feasibly be built within two years. Read on for Dror founder Dror Benshetrit’s statement on the project’s inspiration. From studio founder Dror Benshetrit: In anticipation of the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, the studio developed a new cultural landmark for Montreal’s Île Sainte-Hélène, the original site of the monumental World Fair that took place...

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THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Behavior A reader recently sent us this letter and we think it pretty special: Thanks LifeEdited! You are helping fuel our resolve to continue on our journey simplicity. Our story began the summer of 2014.  My husband and I found ourselves empty nesters, in a huge house, with a huge yard, and a huge to-do list of chores and have-to’s. Our bank account non-existent, our paychecks going out the window faster than we could deposit the paychecks.  All the stuff in the world hadn’t made us happy, only miserably in-debt. So we decided to break out of the box we’d climbed into and regain financial freedom and our joy. We spent five months purging and preparing our home to put on the market to sell.  We must have done...

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MASSIVE SOLAR-POWERED GARDEN TOWERS TO SPRING UP IN TOKYO...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT View Slideshow Tokyo’s urban jungle is about to become a whole lot greener. Dutch firm ingenhoven architects unveiled designs for the Toranomon Project, a mixed-use development draped with greenery that, once complete, will boast the city’s highest residential building at approximately 220 meters tall. Designed to flank the existing Toranomon Hills Mori Tower on two sides, the green-roofed buildings will include a variety of environmentally friendly technologies, from solar panels to gray water recycling. The Toranomon Project will comprise two buildings: a 175,000-square-meter office tower and a 122,000-square-meter residential tower, both of which will be slightly shorter than the 250-meter-tall Toranomon Hills Mori Tower located between the two. The new buildings will feature horizontal ledges to provide solar shading and to maintain a shared architectural vocabulary. OMA has...

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RETHINKING ARCHITECTURE, FROM A ROBOT’S PERSPECTIVE...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Perspective METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Architect Michael Silver believes robots will soon help laborers build the architecture of the future. Matthew Shen Goodman *- Architect Michael Silver is a self-taught roboticist based at the University at Buffalo. There, he cofounded the Sustainable Manufacturing and advanced Robotic Technologies (SMaRT) group that develops robots, such as the two-legged OSCR-3 prototype. All photography courtesy Paul Qaysi “My first robot was made out of Scotch tape and Spirograph gears,” says architect and robotics autodidact Michael Silver. “It ran off nine-volt batteries and a little stepper motor, which was hard for a 12-year-old to find. All it could do was grab a test tube out of one rack and swing it around to another one.” Despite the dearth of motors available to tweens at the time—“This was pre-Internet!”—Silver insists that such...

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WE WISH ALL SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENTS LOOKED LIKE THIS...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture We’ve long extolled the virtues of high density, urban living. By keeping things close, you can walk or bike most places, which is better for both physical and planetary health. Density leads to more social interaction, easier distribution of goods and foods. And so on. But we also understand why people are drawn to the suburbs. It’s nice to have a little more personal space and maybe even a yard. In 2002, architectural and development firm ZED Factory completed their BedZED, a unique housing development that fuses the best of urban living with suburban comfort. The word zed, for those unfamiliar with anglo-numerical nomenclature, means zero. In this case, BedZED, located in Wallington, a commuter suburb located 10 miles outside central London, is the “UK’s largest mixed use, carbon-neutral development.” It...

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ARCHITECTURE: THE BODY-CENTERED ART...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Robert Lamb Hart, drawings by Albrecht Pichler Balcony at Fallingwater. The following is an excerpt from Robert Lamb Hart’s A New Look at Humanism, which aims to apply the insights emerging from the sciences of human life—evolution, ecology, and the neurosciences—to design education and practice. In their innovative study, Body, Memory, and Architecture, architects Kent Bloomer and Charles Moore spell out how the experience of architecture originates as a body’s responses—how architecture is, in a sense, a “body-centered” art. They distil our enormously complex human nature into convincing insights, and the ways they trace out their significance make them immediately available to apply in practice. The basic ideas, once they have been stated, may seem simple and obvious and, in fact, have been exploited brilliantly by artists, designers, and critics. Yet the...

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Q & A: THE ARCHITECT BEHIND THE SANDY HOOK REDESIGN...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Vanessa Quirk Rendering of Sandy Hook School, designed by Svigals+Partners Courtesy Svigals+Partners Sandy Hook School, where twenty children and six adults were fatally shot in 2012, will reopen in August of this year. New-Haven based firm Svigals+Partners has carefully led the Connecticut community in a participatory design process, which has aimed to create a space that harbors both security and pride. Metropolis spoke with Julia McFadden, associate principal at Svigals+Partners, via email to discuss how the architect faced the project’s multiple challenges. Vanessa Quirk: What was the hardest part of the Sandy Hook process for you as an individual? As an architect? Julia McFadden: My normal sense of empathy hit a roadblock; I truly couldn’t fathom what it felt like to lose your child in this way. We needed to listen carefully. Concerns that were shared with us early...

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HOW A SHIPPING CONTAINER COULD BE YOUR NEXT APARTMENT...

Apr 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] With hundreds of millions struggling to pay rent, a surprising solution could be as close as the nearest port. The Danish affordable-housing initiative CPH Shelter uses shipping containers for cost-effective, energy-efficient housing. (Photo: Igor Bezludov via CPH Shelter/Facebook   Even in the happiest nation on earth, students struggle to find housing that accommodates their budget. Now, one architect and his team believe they’ve hit upon a simple solution for young residents of Copenhagen, Denmark: a village made from upcycled shipping containers. “In Denmark, there’s a lack of 20,000 student homes,” Michael Plesner, cofounder and partner at CPH Containers, told TakePart. “If scaled up, container villages can actually help push down the price on the general housing markets of cities, which would benefit everyone.” Advertisement Around the world, some 330 million urban households face...

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THE 10 BEST HOUSES OF 2016

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Vanessa Quirk Hog Pen Creek Retreat, Lake Flato Architects Courtesy Casey Dunn The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected the winners of the 2016 Housing Awards, selecting ten projects that span four award categories: One/Two Family Custom Housing, One/Two Family Production Housing (none selected this year), Multifamily Housing, and Special Housing. Custom Housing: Hog Pen Creek Retreat; Austin, Texas Lake|Flato Architects Courtesy Casey Dunn Courtesy Casey Dunn Independence Pass Residence; Aspen, CO Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Courtesy Nic Lehoux Courtesy Nic Lehoux Island Residence; Honolulu Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Courtesy Nic Lehoux Courtesy Nic Lehoux ​Newberg Residence; Newberg, OR Cutler Anderson Architects Courtesy Jeremy Bitterman & Carey Critchlow Courtesy Jeremy Bitterman & Carey Critchlow Oak Ridge House; Jackson, MS Duvall Decker Architects, P.A. Multifamily Living:​ Cloverdale749; Los Angeles Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects Courtesy Lawrence Anderson Courtesy Lawrence Anderson 1180 Fourth Street; San Francisco Mithun Courtesy Bruce Damonte Courtesy Bruce Damonte Specialized Housing: Whitetail Woods Regional Park Camper Cabins; Farmington, MN HGA Courtesy...

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NEW URBAN MECHANICS: THE START-UP THAT WORKS WITHIN CITY GOVERNMENT...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Rebecca Greenwald  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Courtesy The Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics In 2010 Boston Mayor Tom Menino’s Chief of Staff approached a computer scientist, Nigel Jacob, and a recent Harvard Business School grad, Chris Osgood, with an idea for a new kind of government agency—an agency that would put people, not numbers, at the center of local government projects and processes. That concept soon became the Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics (NUM), a civic innovation group embedded within the local government and run by co-collaborators Nigel and Chris. Now over five years in, Jacob and the NUM team are using technology, design thinking, and both temporary and long-term interventions to create new solutions for the city, from an app to help parents select schools for their children to mini, mobile City...

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TRANSFORMING SPACE MUST BE SEEN TO BE BELIEVED...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture How LAAB fulfilled on the brief must be seen to be believed. Some of the highlights are a tub that doubles as a seating area, an entertainment center that slides out of the wall, sleeping for 4-6 and, perhaps most impressive, a network of “catwalks”–tiny corridors for the cats to play in. The architects said the build necessitated 3mm tolerances to make everything work. Needless to say, most everything is app controllable. Central to making the apartment work was the “Form Follows Time” philosophy, where the space morphs according to the time of day and its attendant use. It’s a concept we’ve long espoused here and on we hope gains traction in architectural thought. LAAB’s fusion of high tech, high design, amazing craftsmanship and lofty thinking has truly set a high...

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UK’S FIRST SOLAR-POWERED GLAZED BUS SHELTER GENERATES ENOUGH ELECTRICITY TO POWER A LONDON HOME...

Apr 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT London has just taken another big step towards a solar-powered future. Today technology company Polysolar and the Canary Wharf Group unveiled the UK’s first transparent solar bus shelter with a ceremony officiated by Green Party candidate Sian Berry. Clad in innovative and transparent photovoltaic glass, the solar bus shelter is capable of generating 2,000 kW-hours per year—equivalent to the amount of electricity needed to power the average London home. Designed by Polysolar in collaboration with hard landscaping and street furniture supplier Marshalls, the Canary Wharf solar bus shelter proves that urban infrastructure can be functional, beautiful, and innovative. The modern and minimalist metal-framed shelter is topped by a butterfly roof to effectively shed rainwater and prevent runoff from spilling onto the heads of transit riders. Related: Solar Powered Bus...

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6 TINY HOMES UNDER $50,000 YOU CAN BUY RIGHT NOW...

Apr 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] 6 Tiny Homes under $50,000 you can buy right now 21 hours ago  under Architecture, carousel showcase, Features, Gallery, Tiny Homes 0 by Lucy Wang Share on Facebook Pin Tweet+ View Slideshow Are you dreaming of a tiny house to call home? Whether you’re looking to downsize for financial freedom or a smaller environmental footprint, you’ll be pleased to know that a whole market has sprung up to offer a wide array of micro-homes that are not only affordable, but also beautiful to boot. We’ve rounded up six such tiny homes that you can buy right now – from prefabricated cabins available for under $10,000 to a portable timber home ready for move-in and immediate travel. Prefabricated Arched Cabins for under $10,000 One of the most affordable housing options we’ve seen lately are...

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PRITZKER PRIZE WINNER ALEJANDRO ARAVENA RELEASES FREE HOUSING DESIGNS TO FIGHT HOMELESSNESS...

Apr 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] INHABITAT by Lacy Cooke View Slideshow The world faces a staggering housing crisis. Three billion people live in cities, but over one billion live below the poverty line in inferior housing, and an estimated 100 million people are homeless. Fortunately, this year’s Pritzker Prize winner Alejandro Aravena just released four free low-income housing designs as a resource for governments and organizations working to combat these problems. Aravena’s Elemental architecture “do tank” just launched four open system drawings for incremental housing plans. The plans are a new resource for governments that otherwise might not invest in quality housing. To build an incremental house, governments pay for half of the cost – often the ground floor and systems like plumbing and electricity – and residents tailor the rest of the building to their needs. Related:...

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TURNING CENTRAL ASIA ANCIENT MESMERIZING PATTERNS INTO CODE...

Apr 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View Vanessa Quirk METROPOLIS MAGAZINE All Images Courtesy Lauren Connell Across the globe, architecture, and the history it embodies, is endangered–not just from the ravages of aging, climate change, or modernization, but, most dramatically, from destruction as a result of conflict. Conscious of this fact, three friends were inspired to act, to help preserve at-risk historical artifacts for future generations. And so Lauren Connell, an architect at BIG, Baris Yuksel, a senior engineer at Google, and Alexis Burson, an associate at Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, put their collective expertise together and created Project Agama: a project to document, digitize, and preserve the Islamic geometric patterns and tile-work of Central Asia. With funding from the Center for Architecture’s LeBrun Travel Grant, the trio set out on a six-week journey across Turkey, Russia, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Azerbaijan, documenting...

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INTERVIEWS WITH ZAHA HADID: THE ARCHITECT’S WORK IN HER OWN WORDS...

Apr 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] image by mary mccartney       on march 31, 2016, world renowned architect zaha hadid passed away at the age of 65. born in baghdad in 1950, she studied mathematics before enrolling at london’s architectural association in 1972. by 1979 she had established zaha hadid architects, and began rising to global prominence. working with office partner patrik schumacher, the studio utilized a host of innovative technologies that often resulted in unexpected and dynamic architectural forms.   last year, hadid spoke with designboom about her upbringing, influences, and creative vision. see her responses in full below, and read on for more thoughts from zaha hadid taken from our previous interview in 2007. DDP, seoul / image by virgile simon bertrand see more of the project on designboom here       DB: what...

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YOU CAN ORDER HONOMOBO’S PREFAB SHIPPING CONTAINER HOMES ON LINE...

Apr 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lidija Grozdanic  INHABITAT View Slideshow Buying a new home can get stressful and costly – but it doesn’t have to be. Canadian company HonoMobo built an entire collection of flexible, multi-use living units out of reused shipping containers. You can use the structures as a backyard cottage, garage suite, weekend getaway or combine them to create apartments and multi-family developments. The fact that you can simply order HonoMobo houses online makes them even more appealing to homeowners. The company designed three types of units with different layouts and sizes. The small 352 square foot HO2 house has an open plan with a full bathroom and functional kitchen. The HO3 knits three containers together to create a bedroom, bathroom, living room and a large kitchen with an island. The HO4 is the company’s largest, and...

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THE DESTRUCTION OF MEMORY, A DOCUMENTARY...

Apr 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View Vanessa Quirk  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE “Part of war and conflict has always been the collateral damage. Buildings have fallen in the path of military objectives, but, […] in this war, buildings aren’t destroyed because they’re in the way of a target. The buildings are the target.” As the narrator of The Destruction of Memory so eloquently explains, the destruction of culture–of buildings, books, and art–is often not an accidental consequence of conflict. As we can see by the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria today, the destruction of cultural artifacts is part and parcel of a conscientious strategy to target and destroy the collective memory, history, and identity of a people. “One of the ways to get rid of history is by remov[ing] all the physical traces of history,” Daniel Libeskind, the architect of the Jewish Museum Berlin, explains in the film. “[To] make believe...

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THIS MASSIVE WIND-POWERED SKYSCRAPER WOULD COOL THE ENTIRE PLANET...

Mar 31, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Lacy Cooke  INHABITAT View Slideshow Paolo Venturella Architecture just unveiled plans for a fantastical Global Cooling Skyscraper that’s designed to fight global warming by cooling the entire planet. The massive skyscraper would extend into space, providing a barrier between the Earth and the Sun in the form of a greenhouse. Accumulating heat in the colossal greenhouse would propel air to flow, generating wind to cool the planet and provide “clean energy for all.” The architects cited the challenges of climate change as an inspiration; they said the strategies we have to combat global warming are not enough, and only a “global strategy” could halt the nature disasters resulting from climate change. So they designed an imaginative skyscraper that would utilize wind power to cool the planet. Related: Bio-Pyramid turns Egypt’s ancient...

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WELL THAT’S ON WAY OF ADDING DENSITY...

Mar 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture The skyscraper is without a doubt the most effective way of adding density to any patch of land.  And eVolo’s Magazine’s Skyscraper Competition is an exploration of innovative designs around this structure, creating “dynamic and adaptive vertical community.” Unlike every other entry, the winner, dubbed “New York Horizon” by Yitan Sun and Jianshi Wu, took an entirely different approach to scraping the sky. Rather than building up, they dug down deep below the surface of Manhattan. Their design calls for the excavation of Central Park. The walls of the hole are lined with housing and other public and private spaces, all of which enjoy unobstructed views of the new Central Park. Here are some more details from the designers: The 1000-feet tall, 100-feet deep mega structure provides a...

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SF STARTUP: FILLING IN URBAN CRACKS WITH OFFICE SPACE...

Mar 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture The small space conversation is generally in reference to housing size. Yes housing is the single largest category of a person’s spatial use, but it’s not the only one. In particular, our work environments can significantly increase our square foot counts and contribute to sprawl and large carbon footprints. San Francisco startup Campsyte has created a compact, modular, easy-install office solution that might help make more edited offices. SHI Similar to KASITA and other prefab housing solutions we’ve seen, Campsyte quickly sets up on unused or underused lots. Using shipping container modules, Campsyte can deploy insta-offices fully equipped with utilities, internet, furnishings, janitorial and coffee/drink service, all of which are included in rent. Campsyte CMO Allen Wong explained to SF Gate that they can set up offices in lots that...

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AS CLIMATE CHANGE HEATS UP, ARCTIC RESIDENTS STRUGGLE TO KEEP THEIR HOMES...

Mar 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] There’s a shortage of housing solutions in the far north, where the Arctic is warming faster than expected. Photograph: Christophe Boisvieux/Corbis Climate change has brought a myriad of issues to the far north, but rising sea levels are now threatening existing home owners and contributing to housing shortages   Heather Hansman   THE GUARDIAN In the spring, after the permafrost thaws and the ground settles, Wilson Andrew Sr takes a wrench to the metal pilings that hold up the foundation of his house in Atmautluak, Alaska, and makes it level again. He cranks the screws until the foundation flattens out, level with the ground. At least for now. Andrew’s house, on a small island traditionally inhabited by indigenous Alaskans, is a prototype modular home designed by the Fairbanks-based nonprofit Cold Climate Housing Research Center...

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A VISION FOR SMARTER PUBLIC SPACES...

Mar 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT   by Jared Green Smarter public spaces / Arup Some designers and engineers want to bring high-speed Wi-Fi to as many public parks and plazas as possible. But instead of expanding the style of the unobtrusive yet freely-available Wi-Fi found in New York City’s Bryant Park, they want to make a statement with advertisement-laden towers that appear to be about 15-feet tall and could be used to charge your phone or access useful neighborhood information via a high-tech interface, a sort of modern-day bulletin board. Their thinking is these towers will act as beacons to attract visitors, who can interact with them 24-7. In a session at SXSW Interactive in Austin, Texas, Randy Ramusack, founder of LQD Wifi, Daniel Hotlzman with Frog Design, and Francesca Birks with Arup discussed this possible vision...

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THE GREEN TEAM: MAKING SPACE IN NEW YORK CITY...

Mar 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Grace Lo METROPOLIS MAGAZINE View of Park Avenue, looking north from Union Square. Summer Streets takes New York City streets and opens them up to people to play, walk, bike, and breathe. Courtesy New York City Department of Transportation Flickr Page When people ask me what I do in New York, and I answer that I’m a landscape architect, the response almost always starts with an enthused “Oh, that’s so awesome/amazing/fun!” Then, a puzzled look—“In the city?” While some savvy design folk assume my work is on rooftops, most picture more traditional public parks as my workplace. In a city that’s growing denser every day, designing an unclaimed parcel of green public space is the exception. More likely than not, our firm’s projects re-organize and repurpose existing space—and while most of these interventions are permanent,...

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BRINGING LIFE TO MORIBUND SHOPPING MALLS...

Mar 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander   LIFE EDITED Architecture No structure better represents consumer culture like the shopping mall. For those who lived to shop, the mall was their home. But as online shopping became a mainstay, as teenagers started hanging out on Facebook instead of at the Orange Julius, the once-mighty mall came crashing down, literally and figuratively. And while it’s a nice idea to re appropriate these structures–turning them into something more useful than a place to buy Poison posters–doing so is not so easy. Most malls are not like the Providence Arcade, with skylights and external windows. They are like Casinos, lightless labyrinths designed to keep you in a consumerism’s snare. As part of a design charette from a few years ago, urban planning firm Duany Plater-Zyberk came up with one of the more...

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SUSTAINABLE CITIES INITIATIVE

Mar 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] GBCI Now Developing SITES AP  by The Dirt Contributor SITES / GBCI In a recent Green Business Certifications Inc. (GBCI) survey, 80 percent of respondents said they planned on implementing SITES® in their organization or practice, and 89 percent indicated interest in earning a professional credential, such as SITES Accredited Professional, or “SITES AP.” As a result, the development of SITES AP is currently under way at GBCI. The new SITES AP credential will not only establish a common framework to define the profession of sustainable land design and construction, it will also provide landscape professionals with the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge, expertise, and commitment to the profession and will help scale up the market for SITES. What is involved in the process of creating the SITES AP? 1. Conception: GBCI will bring...

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10 PARKS THAT CHANGED AMERICA

Mar 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Jared Green PBS will broadcast a new documentary, 10 Parks That Changed America, on April 12th. Produced by WTTW in Chicago and featuring Geoffrey Baer, the show identifies the 10 most influential urban parks in the country, from the era of America’s early settlers to the present day. In a preview at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., Baer and show producer and writer Dan Protess announced the 10 parks selected by WTTW and its expert advisors, including Thaisa Way, ASLA, professor of landscape architecture at University of Washington; Walter Hood, ASLA, professor of landscape architecture at University of California, Berkeley; and Peter Harnik, Hon. ASLA, director of city park excellence at the Trust for Public Land and author of Urban Green: Innovative Parks for Resurgent Cities. Here are...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (MARCH 1 – 15)...

Mar 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT   by J.R. Taylor Buffalo Bayou Park, Houston / Jon Shapley, The Houston Chronicle Saving Water Is So Hot Right Now in Landscape Design – Wired, 3/4/16 “The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) asks hundreds of landscape architects around the U.S. to forecast the trends in outdoor design for the coming year. The point of the survey is to look beyond industry insider buzz and figure out what designers’ clients are actually asking for. This year’s results are in, and they show people are overwhelmingly concerned with water conservation.” The Great Wall of Japan Divides a Country Still Reeling from 2011’s Earthquake – Lakes Mail, 3/5/16 “Within months, plans to build super seawalls of up to 17m in height along more than 400km of the coastline of the worst-hit Fukishima,...

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ARCHITECTURE FOR PEOPLE, NOT MACHINES...

Mar 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View  Nikos A. Salingaros METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Traditional corridors employ natural light and numerous, visually-interesting patterns to create a healing environment, giving us a positive feeling: “This space is so nice that I should spend some time here instead of just walking through.” Drawing by Nikos A. Salingaros How machines differ from organisms ​Throughout their lives, people are continually exposed to entirely distinct types of architectural experiences. Explaining the difference comes down to the contrast between the machine and the organism; these definitions are crucial for understanding and judging architecture (Salingaros & Masden, 2008; 2015). The crucial distinction between machines and organisms goes far beyond architecture, of course, and is nicely clarified in the Santiago School of Cognition (Hallowell, 2009). Let me summarize this important work by Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela here. First, organisms...

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