ARCHITECTURE ISN’T THE VILLAIN OF “HIGH-RISE” — WE ARE...

May 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Zach Mortice  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE In High-Rise, the titular luxury residential tower is crowned by an elaborate roof garden, complete with a thatch-roofed cottage. ©StudioCanal For a different take on High-Rise, see our review of the film. In Ben Wheatley’s High-Rise, the first film adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s novel, you get the entire litany of architecture-run-amok as it appears in virtually any cultural product. There’s the architect as mad visionary, capable of bringing astounding visions of the future into the present but unable to dictate their evolution once human imperfection intervenes. There’s the mania of stacking too many people too high into the sky. And there’s the reckless and ignorant call to knock it all down and build again, tabula rasa, when it all falls apart. All this is packaged in a set of aesthetics typical of...

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DYSTOPIA IN THE SKY

May 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] y The first film adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s classic novel “High-Rise” is a decadent romp set against a background of Brutalism. Shumi Bose  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE The Brutalist high-rises in Ben Wheatley’s new film were inspired in part by Ernö Goldfinger’s Trellick and Balfron towers in London. Courtesy Magnolia Pictures For architects, if I may generalize an entire professional community, there are few novelists as cultishly beloved as J.G. Ballard. Borges or Calvino have their fair share of admirers, but to borrow an adjective more frequently applied to buildings, Ballard is the most iconic of literary figures—especially for readers of a concrete-expansion-joint persuasion. Witnessing war as a child, training in medicine, and thereafter writing from a rather bloodless middle-class patch of suburbia, Ballard spun tales of urban life that continue to be uncomfortably visceral. High-Rise was published...

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DESIGN ADVOCACY AND MATERIAL SUSTAINABILITY...

May 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Dora Vanette   METROPOLIS MAGAZINE The Downtown Houston Childcare Center, designed by Kirksey Architecure with the goal of providing flexible learning spaces and utilizing natural materials and textures Photo by: Slyworks Photography Throughout 2015, Metropolis’s publisher and editor in chief, Susan S. Szenasy, led the Metropolis Think Tank series of conversations on the seismic cultural shifts reshaping our society and the importance of injecting a new humanism into design and architecture in order to better deal with emerging challenges. As part of these ongoing discussions, Szenasy engages key industry leaders and gives a voice to different knowledge groups that participate in these processes—from architecture firms and clients to researchers and consultants. On August 26, she talked with the principals of Houston-based Kirksey Architecture about architects as design advocates, master builders, and how material sustainability and building codes...

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NATION’S LARGEST GREEN WALL OF NATIVE PLANTS BREATHES LIFE IN SF MOMA...

May 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT View Slideshow The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) opened to incredible fanfare on Saturday, as thousands eagerly poured into the newly renovated museum that nearly tripled its gallery space after a three-year expansion project. While Snohetta’s new design and the museum’s dizzying amount of art—there are 19 inaugural exhibitions—will be the main draw to many, we have our eye on another museum addition: the SFMOMA Living Wall. Part art, part landscape architecture, the giant living wall designed by Habitat Horticulture is the nation’s largest public green wall of native plants that also boasts impressive eco-friendly elements. SFMOMA Living Wall by Habitat Horticulture, SFMOMA green wall, SFMOMA living wall, San Francisco green wall, nation’s biggest living wall, U.S. biggest public living wall The massive living wall stands...

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THIS SCIENCE FICTION DYSTOPIAN HOUSING IS SO COOL...

May 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture This author is not a science fiction enthusiast, so forgive my ignorance of Ernie Cline and his 2011 book “Ready Player One,” which apparently is a big deal in that world. The cover of the book shows a skyline of the not-so-far off dystopian future the book portrays. Dystopian as it’s supposed to be, the towers of stacked camper trailers look pretty awesome, like an uber low-tech version of Kasita prefab housing. HT to Tim...

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40 PERCENT OF THE BUILDINGS IN MANHATTAN COULD NOT BE BUILT TODAY...

May 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE UPSHOT – NYTIMES These are buildings that do not conform to New York City’s zoning code for at least one reason. Because They Are Too Tall … These tend to be apartment buildings concentrated on the Upper East Side and Upper West Side. Or They Have Too Many Apartments … The West Village and Chelsea are the biggest offenders in terms of density. Or Too Many Businesses … Technically, too many square feet dedicated to commercial uses. Mostly concentrated in Midtown and the East Village. But They Made New York Great. (Sometimes.) By QUOCTRUNG BUI, MATT A.V. CHABAN and JEREMY WHITE MAY 20, 2016 New York City’s zoning code turns 100 this year. That may not sound like cause for celebration — except maybe for land-use lawyers and Robert Moses aficionados. Yet...

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UNIVERSITY LANDSCAPES TEACH, TOO...

May 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green University of Virginia campus / Perfect Soccer Recruit “Landscapes have long been essential to the transfer of knowledge,” said Daniel Bluestone, a professor of history, art, and architecture at Boston University at Dumbarton Oaks’ symposium on landscape and the academy. In ancient Greece, “Hippocrates taught the art of medicine under a tree. And in China, there has been a tradition of educational landscapes, including the book garden.” Fast forward to the founding of some early colleges and universities in the United States, and we see the beginning of a “distinctly American type of educational landscape,” with gardens, arboreta, and designed views. Early American university campuses were designed to “train the eye to outside beauty,” create a long-lasting appreciation for nature, and build important values like self-reliance. Today, some...

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SOLAR-POWERED HOTEL AT OBERLIN IS FIRST IN U.S. TO BE HEATED AND COOLED WITH GEOTHERMAL ENERGY...

May 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Cat DiStasio  INHABITAT View Slideshow The sleepy town of Oberlin, Ohio is primarily known for being home to an historic college of the same name, but its reputation may be refreshed by the addition of a new LEED-certified hotel. The Hotel at Oberlin, whose profits will establish scholarships for students of Oberlin College, celebrated its opening this month. The hotel has a host of sustainable features, ranging from solar power to geothermal heat, as well as reclaimed building materials and locally-sourced foods in the onsite restaurant, making it an environmental star in the heartland. In addition to 70 guest rooms and suites, the Hotel at Oberlin features a bar and restaurant serving locally-sourced foods. The hotel’s adjoined conference facility, the Peter B. Lewis Gateway Center, includes a 3,800-square-foot event space with state-of-the-art...

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ONE BUILDING IS SAVING $1 MILLION A YEAR ON ENERGY. WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF THE WHOLE WORLD WAS MORE EFFICIENT?...

May 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Keith Srakocic The U.S. Steel Building in Pittsburgh saves more than a million dollars a year after retrofitting for better efficiency.   Amid all the talk about transitioning to clean energy sources, consider this: The cleanest energy is the energy we never use. It’s also the cheapest, which is one reason that companies are embracing energy efficiency now more than ever. In fact, energy efficiency — now being rebranded for the business sector as energy productivity — is having a moment. “People have been working on this topic for the last 20 to 30 years, but there still are so many opportunities that need to be unlocked,” Jenny Chu, a manager at The Climate Group, told ThinkProgress. Chu was speaking from the Alliance to Save Energy’s...

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RED HOOK REIMAGINED: TOWARDS URBAN COASTAL RESILIENCE...

May 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Michael Fletcher  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE New York City Hurricane Evacuation Zones: Red Hook, Brooklyn Image courtesy NYC GOV/TerreformONE Red Hook, Brooklyn is a New York neighborhood so rich in history, culture and diversity that even after its devastation by Super Storm Sandy, many of those who call it home wouldn’t live anywhere else. However, Red Hook faces significant challenges. A series of design and infrastructure missteps, dating back to New York’s Master Builder Robert Moses and the U.S. Housing Authority’s underwriting of the Red Hook Houses in the 1930s, cut the neighborhood off from surrounding areas. There is no subway within Red Hook, and the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway separates it from the rest of the five boroughs. And when Sandy hit, the neighborhood was unprepared, leaving residents on the coastline in squalor. New York City...

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AFTER ISIS: THE CHALLENGE OF PRESERVING PALMYRA...

May 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] ladimir Gintoff Palmyra, Site Overview. Courtesy Flickr User: Jiří Suchomel licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 This article originally appeared on ArchDaily. Last May, Islamic State forces took control of Palmyra, one of the world’s most treasured UNESCO World Heritage Sites. In the proceeding months, the world looked on in shock as ISIS released a series of videos showing the destruction of the priceless ruins. Last month however, the ancient city was recaptured, marking the beginning of a difficult discussion about what the international preservation community should do next. ArchDaily had the opportunity to interview Stefan Simon, the Inaugural Director of the Institute for the Preservation of Cultural Heritage (IPCH) at Yale University, an organization “dedicated to advancing the field of heritage science by improving the science and practice of conservation in a sustainable manner.” Simon earned his PhD in Chemistry from the Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, and has...

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A SUBURB THAT PUTS PEOPLE FIRST...

May 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture One of the biggest demerits of suburban living is how they can have an isolating effect on people who live in them. When most suburbanites leave home, they enter a car that’s usually in an enclosed garage where you often drive to another garage at work or the store or wherever. In cities where garages are less common, you leave your home and you’re thrust into contact with your fellow human. We’ve looked at Pocket Communities before, which are communities of single family houses where the front door faces a commons area, fostering a more social living environment. And we just ran across this new suburban development in Mannheim, Germany that puts the humans first in its design. The development, which has many of the hallmarks of suburbia...

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THE UNBEARABLE LIGHTNESS OF TINY LIVING...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Each week we are profiling real people who are editing their lives for more freedom and happiness. This week we hear from Jan, who lives in 98 sq ft tiny house. He shares his experience about the freedom of tiny, lightweight living as well as the difficulties of meshing different attitudes about stuff and space in relationships. Tell us about yourself My name is Jan. I am 45 and work as a photographer and videographer. I am separated with a 3-year-old boy. My parents, both children in Germany during the WWII, instilled a non-consumptive, credit free life-style. They modeled buying quality over quantity and only paying cash for what you can afford. Later, I backpacked for several years, and all through my twenties and early thirties never paid more...

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THOMAS BALSLEY TELLS HIS STORY THROUGH PUBLIC SPACES...

May 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Jared Green Thomas Balsley Uncommon Ground / ORO Editions Thomas Balsley, FASLA, and his eponymous firm have created over 100 public spaces in New York City alone, not to mention numerous award-winning plazas and parks around the U.S. and the world. Over 25 years of practice, Balsley has found opportunities where others may not have looked: in small scraps of land such as “bonus plazas,” otherwise known as privately-owned public spaces, and in “barren, failed places” along post-industrial waterfronts. There, Balsley turned lemons into lemonade for us all, creating humane, beautiful public spaces that show all kinds of landscapes can be made valuable through thoughtful design. His firm’s key projects are explored in the new book Thomas Balsley: Uncommon Ground, which covers everything from “small urban plazas and courtyards to...

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“DEMO:POLIS” ASKS WHAT WE MEAN WHEN WE TALK ABOUT PUBLIC SPACE...

Apr 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   George Kafka  METROPOLIS  MAGAZINE The Pallet Theatre in Granby Park, Dublin, was designed by Seán Harrington Architects. ©Seán Harrington Architects, ©Alice Clancy Two questions had been preoccupying me on my way through the well-tended lawns of Berlin’s Tiergarten to see Demo:polis, an exhibition on the right to public space at the Akademie der Künste: how does one exhibit public space in the white (or concrete gray) cube of a gallery? And what, exactly, are we talking about when we talk about public space? Upon entering the show, my qualms were immediately quieted. The former was made clear from the intelligent layout of the exhibition, whose arrangement echoes the visual language of the subject matter at hand. Pseudo streets, squares, and city blocks are formed by a grid of chipboard panels and encourage the...

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SIMPLE IS AS SIMPLE LIVES

Apr 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture Sure, high tech micro apartments are pretty nifty, but never underestimate the power of good design even with the most meager means. Case in point is Vila Matilde by São Paulo’s Terra e Tuma Arquitetos. Ms Dalva, the owner of the home, has lived in the same location for decades.  When her previous structure started crumblilng down around her, she was faced with two options: buy an apartment that would exhaust all of her savings and put her further from her family, or build a new structure. Ms Dalva’s son reached out to Terra e Tuma to help design the structure we see here. The house took only 10 months to construct, four of which were spent tearing down the previous structure. Time was of the essence because...

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FAILING BACKWARD

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Metropolis Magazine A new book treats the architectural failures of a radical past as a learning opportunity for an apathetic present. Anna Khachiyan Buckminster Fuller’s giant dome for Expo 67 in Montreal presents a harmonious vision of high technology nestled in nature. All images courtesy Verso “Nothing dates faster than people’s fantasies about the future,” scoffed art critic Robert Hughes in 1980, referencing Oscar Niemeyer and Lúcio Costa’s pop-up capital Brasília. The quote originally appeared in The Shock of the New, the last hurrah in a string of politically aware television documentaries on art history and visual culture that also included Kenneth Clark’s Civilization (1968) and John Berger’s Ways of Seeing (1972). So it’s fitting that it appears again in Last Futures: Nature, Technology, and the End of Architecture (Verso, 2016), by architect and writer Douglas...

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BUCKY’S BIOSPHERE GETS A FRIEND...

Apr 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Vanessa Quirk  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE All images courtesy of Dror To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, the New-York based design studio Dror has announced a proposal for the world-famous site: to give R. Buckminster Fuller’s Biosphere, which has served as a landmark monument on Montreal’s Île Sainte-Hélène for decades, a long-awaited companion. The studio has designed another dome, an 150-meter wide aluminum sphere covered by natural vegetation, that would serve as a site for festivals and events. The structure, still speculative at the moment, is meant to suggest an alternative to Parc Jean-Drapeau’s development plan and could feasibly be built within two years. Read on for Dror founder Dror Benshetrit’s statement on the project’s inspiration. From studio founder Dror Benshetrit: In anticipation of the 50th anniversary of Expo 67, the studio developed a new cultural landmark for Montreal’s Île Sainte-Hélène, the original site of the monumental World Fair that took place...

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THIS IS WHAT IT’S ALL ABOUT...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Behavior A reader recently sent us this letter and we think it pretty special: Thanks LifeEdited! You are helping fuel our resolve to continue on our journey simplicity. Our story began the summer of 2014.  My husband and I found ourselves empty nesters, in a huge house, with a huge yard, and a huge to-do list of chores and have-to’s. Our bank account non-existent, our paychecks going out the window faster than we could deposit the paychecks.  All the stuff in the world hadn’t made us happy, only miserably in-debt. So we decided to break out of the box we’d climbed into and regain financial freedom and our joy. We spent five months purging and preparing our home to put on the market to sell.  We must have done...

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MASSIVE SOLAR-POWERED GARDEN TOWERS TO SPRING UP IN TOKYO...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT View Slideshow Tokyo’s urban jungle is about to become a whole lot greener. Dutch firm ingenhoven architects unveiled designs for the Toranomon Project, a mixed-use development draped with greenery that, once complete, will boast the city’s highest residential building at approximately 220 meters tall. Designed to flank the existing Toranomon Hills Mori Tower on two sides, the green-roofed buildings will include a variety of environmentally friendly technologies, from solar panels to gray water recycling. The Toranomon Project will comprise two buildings: a 175,000-square-meter office tower and a 122,000-square-meter residential tower, both of which will be slightly shorter than the 250-meter-tall Toranomon Hills Mori Tower located between the two. The new buildings will feature horizontal ledges to provide solar shading and to maintain a shared architectural vocabulary. OMA has...

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RETHINKING ARCHITECTURE, FROM A ROBOT’S PERSPECTIVE...

Apr 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Perspective METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Architect Michael Silver believes robots will soon help laborers build the architecture of the future. Matthew Shen Goodman *- Architect Michael Silver is a self-taught roboticist based at the University at Buffalo. There, he cofounded the Sustainable Manufacturing and advanced Robotic Technologies (SMaRT) group that develops robots, such as the two-legged OSCR-3 prototype. All photography courtesy Paul Qaysi “My first robot was made out of Scotch tape and Spirograph gears,” says architect and robotics autodidact Michael Silver. “It ran off nine-volt batteries and a little stepper motor, which was hard for a 12-year-old to find. All it could do was grab a test tube out of one rack and swing it around to another one.” Despite the dearth of motors available to tweens at the time—“This was pre-Internet!”—Silver insists that such...

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WE WISH ALL SUBURBAN DEVELOPMENTS LOOKED LIKE THIS...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture We’ve long extolled the virtues of high density, urban living. By keeping things close, you can walk or bike most places, which is better for both physical and planetary health. Density leads to more social interaction, easier distribution of goods and foods. And so on. But we also understand why people are drawn to the suburbs. It’s nice to have a little more personal space and maybe even a yard. In 2002, architectural and development firm ZED Factory completed their BedZED, a unique housing development that fuses the best of urban living with suburban comfort. The word zed, for those unfamiliar with anglo-numerical nomenclature, means zero. In this case, BedZED, located in Wallington, a commuter suburb located 10 miles outside central London, is the “UK’s largest mixed use, carbon-neutral development.” It...

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ARCHITECTURE: THE BODY-CENTERED ART...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Robert Lamb Hart, drawings by Albrecht Pichler Balcony at Fallingwater. The following is an excerpt from Robert Lamb Hart’s A New Look at Humanism, which aims to apply the insights emerging from the sciences of human life—evolution, ecology, and the neurosciences—to design education and practice. In their innovative study, Body, Memory, and Architecture, architects Kent Bloomer and Charles Moore spell out how the experience of architecture originates as a body’s responses—how architecture is, in a sense, a “body-centered” art. They distil our enormously complex human nature into convincing insights, and the ways they trace out their significance make them immediately available to apply in practice. The basic ideas, once they have been stated, may seem simple and obvious and, in fact, have been exploited brilliantly by artists, designers, and critics. Yet the...

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Q & A: THE ARCHITECT BEHIND THE SANDY HOOK REDESIGN...

Apr 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Vanessa Quirk Rendering of Sandy Hook School, designed by Svigals+Partners Courtesy Svigals+Partners Sandy Hook School, where twenty children and six adults were fatally shot in 2012, will reopen in August of this year. New-Haven based firm Svigals+Partners has carefully led the Connecticut community in a participatory design process, which has aimed to create a space that harbors both security and pride. Metropolis spoke with Julia McFadden, associate principal at Svigals+Partners, via email to discuss how the architect faced the project’s multiple challenges. Vanessa Quirk: What was the hardest part of the Sandy Hook process for you as an individual? As an architect? Julia McFadden: My normal sense of empathy hit a roadblock; I truly couldn’t fathom what it felt like to lose your child in this way. We needed to listen carefully. Concerns that were shared with us early...

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HOW A SHIPPING CONTAINER COULD BE YOUR NEXT APARTMENT...

Apr 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] With hundreds of millions struggling to pay rent, a surprising solution could be as close as the nearest port. The Danish affordable-housing initiative CPH Shelter uses shipping containers for cost-effective, energy-efficient housing. (Photo: Igor Bezludov via CPH Shelter/Facebook   Even in the happiest nation on earth, students struggle to find housing that accommodates their budget. Now, one architect and his team believe they’ve hit upon a simple solution for young residents of Copenhagen, Denmark: a village made from upcycled shipping containers. “In Denmark, there’s a lack of 20,000 student homes,” Michael Plesner, cofounder and partner at CPH Containers, told TakePart. “If scaled up, container villages can actually help push down the price on the general housing markets of cities, which would benefit everyone.” Advertisement Around the world, some 330 million urban households face...

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THE 10 BEST HOUSES OF 2016

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Vanessa Quirk Hog Pen Creek Retreat, Lake Flato Architects Courtesy Casey Dunn The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected the winners of the 2016 Housing Awards, selecting ten projects that span four award categories: One/Two Family Custom Housing, One/Two Family Production Housing (none selected this year), Multifamily Housing, and Special Housing. Custom Housing: Hog Pen Creek Retreat; Austin, Texas Lake|Flato Architects Courtesy Casey Dunn Courtesy Casey Dunn Independence Pass Residence; Aspen, CO Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Courtesy Nic Lehoux Courtesy Nic Lehoux Island Residence; Honolulu Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Courtesy Nic Lehoux Courtesy Nic Lehoux ​Newberg Residence; Newberg, OR Cutler Anderson Architects Courtesy Jeremy Bitterman & Carey Critchlow Courtesy Jeremy Bitterman & Carey Critchlow Oak Ridge House; Jackson, MS Duvall Decker Architects, P.A. Multifamily Living:​ Cloverdale749; Los Angeles Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects Courtesy Lawrence Anderson Courtesy Lawrence Anderson 1180 Fourth Street; San Francisco Mithun Courtesy Bruce Damonte Courtesy Bruce Damonte Specialized Housing: Whitetail Woods Regional Park Camper Cabins; Farmington, MN HGA Courtesy...

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NEW URBAN MECHANICS: THE START-UP THAT WORKS WITHIN CITY GOVERNMENT...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Rebecca Greenwald  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Courtesy The Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics In 2010 Boston Mayor Tom Menino’s Chief of Staff approached a computer scientist, Nigel Jacob, and a recent Harvard Business School grad, Chris Osgood, with an idea for a new kind of government agency—an agency that would put people, not numbers, at the center of local government projects and processes. That concept soon became the Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics (NUM), a civic innovation group embedded within the local government and run by co-collaborators Nigel and Chris. Now over five years in, Jacob and the NUM team are using technology, design thinking, and both temporary and long-term interventions to create new solutions for the city, from an app to help parents select schools for their children to mini, mobile City...

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TRANSFORMING SPACE MUST BE SEEN TO BE BELIEVED...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander  LIFE EDITED Architecture How LAAB fulfilled on the brief must be seen to be believed. Some of the highlights are a tub that doubles as a seating area, an entertainment center that slides out of the wall, sleeping for 4-6 and, perhaps most impressive, a network of “catwalks”–tiny corridors for the cats to play in. The architects said the build necessitated 3mm tolerances to make everything work. Needless to say, most everything is app controllable. Central to making the apartment work was the “Form Follows Time” philosophy, where the space morphs according to the time of day and its attendant use. It’s a concept we’ve long espoused here and on we hope gains traction in architectural thought. LAAB’s fusion of high tech, high design, amazing craftsmanship and lofty thinking has truly set a high...

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UK’S FIRST SOLAR-POWERED GLAZED BUS SHELTER GENERATES ENOUGH ELECTRICITY TO POWER A LONDON HOME...

Apr 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT London has just taken another big step towards a solar-powered future. Today technology company Polysolar and the Canary Wharf Group unveiled the UK’s first transparent solar bus shelter with a ceremony officiated by Green Party candidate Sian Berry. Clad in innovative and transparent photovoltaic glass, the solar bus shelter is capable of generating 2,000 kW-hours per year—equivalent to the amount of electricity needed to power the average London home. Designed by Polysolar in collaboration with hard landscaping and street furniture supplier Marshalls, the Canary Wharf solar bus shelter proves that urban infrastructure can be functional, beautiful, and innovative. The modern and minimalist metal-framed shelter is topped by a butterfly roof to effectively shed rainwater and prevent runoff from spilling onto the heads of transit riders. Related: Solar Powered Bus...

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6 TINY HOMES UNDER $50,000 YOU CAN BUY RIGHT NOW...

Apr 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] 6 Tiny Homes under $50,000 you can buy right now 21 hours ago  under Architecture, carousel showcase, Features, Gallery, Tiny Homes 0 by Lucy Wang Share on Facebook Pin Tweet+ View Slideshow Are you dreaming of a tiny house to call home? Whether you’re looking to downsize for financial freedom or a smaller environmental footprint, you’ll be pleased to know that a whole market has sprung up to offer a wide array of micro-homes that are not only affordable, but also beautiful to boot. We’ve rounded up six such tiny homes that you can buy right now – from prefabricated cabins available for under $10,000 to a portable timber home ready for move-in and immediate travel. Prefabricated Arched Cabins for under $10,000 One of the most affordable housing options we’ve seen lately are...

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