14 to 1: Post-Katrina Architecture by the Numbers...

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The postdiluvian landscape contains little cutting-edge design but rather an abundance of familiarity and replication. What does this reveal about New Orleans society? Richard Campanella with Cassidy Rosen Musicians’ Village, a Habitat for Humanity project in New Orleans. [Tanya Lukasik] All human landscape has cultural meaning — no matter how ordinary. … All our cultural warts and blemishes are there, and our glories too. — F. Pierce Lewis, “Axioms of the Landscape,” 1976 Last year the world media converged noisily on New Orleans to mark the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. This year marked a quieter but still significant milestone: it’s been a decade since the actual start of the structural recovery, which began tentatively in early 2006. So this is an apt moment to assess the results. How have the citizens of...

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Hamburg Creates a Vibrant Neighborhood by Creating Spaces for People...

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Dennis Pieprz Cities develop over time. A relatively “new” city might be as old as a century. Any city or neighborhood younger than twenty years old, in urban design terms, is a newborn, a place in the-process-of-becoming. In Hamburg, Germany, a startling work in progress is underway, in Hafencity, a mixed-used district that when completed will be home to 12,000 residents and almost 40,000 office workers. In the early 1990s, as the 19th century Elbe River warehouse district fell into disuse, Hamburg officials began to reimagine the river islands that were once the bustling hub of the city. The new district, one of the largest urban redevelopments in Europe, has numerous community and cultural buildings, including the much delayed (and anticipated) Elbe Philharmonic Hall, by Herzog & De Meuron, located prominently at...

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How Brandcentric Architecture is Destroying Our Sense of Place...

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Ben Willis In 2013, an online game called Geoguessr caught fire across the social media landscape.  The user is placed in a randomly-selected Google street view—anywhere from a desolate stretch of highway in Alaska to the downtown streets of Monaco—and then asked to pinpoint on a map where in the world they have been dropped. It’s a Sherlock-Holmes-meets-Carmen-San-Diego style challenge that puts the regional identities of the world on digital display. The game has now received sponsorships from the likes of Lufthansa and the Intercontinental Hotels Group, which means I wasn’t the only person who experienced an extreme wanderlust while playing it. After a few minutes (or hours, if I’m being honest) playing Geoguessr, it became clear that the most difficult landscapes to pinpoint are, in fact, the landscapes that many of...

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David Hertz’s Los Angeles Oasis...

Jul 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The architect and environmentalist is known for repurposing materials. Now a new device is helping him turn air into water. By Sheila Marikar   NEW YORKER MAGAZINE The L.A. architect and environmentalist David Hertz has a knack for repurposing stuff: planks of wood into skateboards, the wings of a Boeing 747 into the roof of a house, crushed LPs (smashed by teens in a gang intervention program) into flooring for a record label’s headquarters. But when a former client told him, last year, that he knew a guy who had invented a way to turn air into water, Hertz was incredulous. “I was, like, sure, let’s try it,” Hertz said. “It sounds like alchemy. And it sounds too good to be true, but let’s try it.” Hertz connected with Richard Groden, a general contractor...

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WHY CITY PLANNERS LOVE PORTLAND...

Jul 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Dennis Pieprz Portland, Oregon is a poster child for urban geeks everywhere–and for good reason. It’s an urban design success story. (There aren’t a whole lot of American examples of that.) Dennis Pieprz, a design principal at Sasaki Associates, recently began work on a project there, and visited after a twenty year absence. “Portland has always been ahead of the country,” he says. “Think of the urban growth boundary, recycling programs, bike paths, investments in transit, the fine grained urban blocks.” Here he takes a close look at Portland’s Pearl District, a relatively new area rapidly transforming into a great urban neighborhood. –Martin C. Pedersen     “This is near Jamison Square, a remarkable public space (designed by Peter Walker Associates) in the Pearl District,” Pieprz says. “It’s tough to imagine a...

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TADAO ANDO’S 152 ELIZABETH STREET IN NEW YORK INCLUDES A MONUMENTAL GREEN WALL...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]       ‘152 elizabeth street’ is an ultra luxury condominium building located in new york’s nolita neighborhood. designed by acclaimed japanese architect tadao ando, the scheme measures 32,000-square feet and comprises a total of seven stories and seven residences. each dwelling has been designed as a bespoke custom home, individually configured to highlight craft, detail, and quality. the living green wall measures 55 feet by 99 feet (17 x 30 meters) image by noë & associates and the boundary       developed by sumaida + khurana, ando is collaborating on the project with michael gabellini, the architect of record who is also designing the building’s interiors. in addition to ando’s signature poured-in-place concrete, the scheme also features a living green wall measuring 55-feet-high and 99-feet-wide — one of the largest in...

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PENDA POSES GREEN-FILLED SKY VILLA RESIDENCES IN INDIA...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]         penda has shared the latest development for his magic breeze project in hyderabad / india with the proposal of a residential idea of a ‘house with a garden’ to complement the maze-like garden landscape. the 450,000 square foot development is composed of 127 units; designed as duplex sky villas with each unit divided from its neighbor by a double-height, private garden. these green ‘in-between spaces’ create a sense of openness and vitality to the compound and loosens up the density a tenant would experience in a common condominium building. the complex would be composed of residential 127 units       for the project, penda developed a modular planter system that would be installed as an extension for the balconies of each unit. each planter can be filled with...

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HOW FRANK GEHRY’S L.A. RIVER MAKE-OVER WILL CHANGE THE CITY AND WHY HE TOOK THE JOB...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The 6th Street Bridge over the L.A. River; famed architect Frank Gehry has been working for about a year on a wide-ranging new plan for the river, with the focus on hydrology, not architectural landmarks. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) Christopher Hawthorne  LA TIMES Frank Gehry and the Los Angeles River: It’s a combination that makes zero sense (if you’re looking strictly at Gehry’s resume) and follows a natural logic (if you think about the interest the architect’s work has long shown in L.A.’s linear infrastructure and its overlooked, harder-to-love corners). And it might give Mayor Eric Garcetti a way to confront the growing conventional wisdom that he is sometimes paralyzed by caution, gun-shy about big-ticket or controversial efforts to remake the city. The 86-year-old Gehry has been working for about a...

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THE RESURGENCE OF DOWNTOWN DETROIT...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   THE DIRT  BY Jared Green John Varvatos boutique, downtown Detroit / John Varvatos “The opportunities Detroit has today are a logical evolution from its past mistakes and disinvestment. To an extent, change wouldn’t be possible without that,” explained Kent Anderson, ASLA, founder of KH Anderson, in a tour of downtown Detroit during the Congress for New Urbanism (CNU). He added that Detroit native Dan Gilbert, the founder and owner of Quicken Loans, who has bought up nearly 80 buildings downtown over the past decade, is largely responsible for the resurgence today. “Gilbert recognized the time was right for setting a new direction.” Anderson raced us through a tour of downtown, explaining the history of the area and how the city got to where it is today. We raced in part because almost...

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THE PUBLIC SPACES OF THE FUTURE: UP FOR NEGOTIATION...

Jun 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Dirt Contributor Demo:Polis / Carolina Leite The jury is in. Over the next fifty years, the world’s cities will face unprecedented stresses from a changing climate, growing populations, and issues of security, resource scarcity, and civil unrest. In the design professions, we like to think our work can help resolve these issues. In the U.S., over the past century, we have debated the role of public space to ease the challenges faced within our urban environment. This conversation will not end anytime soon, nor should it. However, if we continue to place our trust and faith in urban public spaces we must re-examine two fundamental questions: how will we define success within these spaces, and who will we allow to shape them? Demo:Polis, an exhibition at the Akademie der Künste in Berlin,...

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shigeru ban, kengo kuma + sou fujimoto among dwelling designers for tokyo’s house vision...

Jun 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] shigeru ban, kengo kuma + sou fujimoto among dwelling designers for tokyo’s house vision (above) pavilion 1: house with refrigerator access from outside by yamato holdings x fumie shibata       big names in japanese architecture — including sou fujimoto, kengo kuma, and shigeru ban — have joined forces with brands such as airbnb, muji, and panasonic as part of a large event taking place in july and august 2016. ‘house vision’ is an exhibition held in tokyo that focuses on domesticity at the intersection between industries. launched in march 2011, the event provides a platform for creating a future vision of the industry with the house as its nexus. pavilion 2: yoshino-sugi cedar house by airbnb x go hasegawa see more of the project on designboom here       three...

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THE NEW LANDSCAPE DECLARATION: LOOKING BACK OVER THE LAST 50 YEARS...

Jun 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The Dirt Contributor Manhattan smog in 1966 / Andy Blair At the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF)’s New Landscape Declaration: A Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future, which met in Philadelphia last week, more than 700 landscape architects offered personal declarations and contributed their ideas, all in an effort to shape the 50-year follow-up to LAF’s original declaration of concern, published in 1966 amid massive political and social change and an era of environmental degradation in the United States. Although the focus of the summit was on forging a new declaration and vision for the profession that can guide the efforts of landscape architects over the next five decades, there was also a call to “critically reflect on what landscape architecture has achieved over the last 50 years.” Amid all the declarations and...

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THE NEW LANDSCAPE DECLARATION: VISIONS FOR THE NEXT 50 YEARS...

Jun 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  BY  Jared Green India’s water crisis / National Geographic Over the next 50 years, landscape architects must coordinate their actions globally to fight climate change, help communities adapt to a changing world, bring artful and sustainable parks and open spaces to every community rich or poor, preserve cultural landscape heritage, and sustain all forms of life on Earth. These were the central messages that came out the Landscape Architecture Foundation (LAF)‘s New Landscape Declaration: Summit on Landscape Architecture and the Future in Philadelphia, which was attended by over 700 landscape architects. The speakers used declarations and short idea-packed talks, and attendees used cards, polls, and an interactive question and commenting app to provide input into a new declaration — a vision to guide the efforts of landscape architects to 2066. As...

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5 Eco-Friendly Social Housing Projects...

Jun 19, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Several modern public housing projects are not only beautiful living spaces, but smart, money-saving, eco-friendly designs using innovative technologies. By Nathaniel Berman / AlterNet We are living through what the United Nations has described as “the largest wave of urban growth in history.” Today, around 54 percent of the world’s population—nearly 4 billion people—live in cities and towns. By 2030, the U.N. projects, that number will grow to 5 billion. With such a crowded future in store, governments worldwide are struggling to provide for people who need help with housing. But it’s one thing to provide low-cost spaces for individuals and families. It’s another thing to make those spaces well-designed and attractive. In previous generations, many countries simply built square apartment buildings that were designed with one goal in mind: To accommodate the most people for...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (JUNE 1 – 15)...

Jun 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  J.R. Taylor A towering waterfall appears to fall from midair into the Grand Canal at the Palace of Versailles / Dezeen The Forgotten Space Under this Sao Paulo Highway Will Become a Hanging Garden and Park – Co.Exist, 6/2/16 “When an elevated highway was built in the middle of downtown São Paulo in 1971, the city said it was attempting to improve traffic. Instead, congestion got worse. The two-mile stretch of road, called Minhocão (‘Big Worm’) is now one of the most polluted parts of a city where smog kills thousands of people a year.” DLANDstudio Launches Phase 1 Design for Rails-to-Trails QueensWay – The Architect’s Newspaper, 6/2/16 “After years of debate over what to do with the 60-year old abandoned Rockaway Long Island Railroad (LIRR), the coalition has been moving...

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WHY LIGHT MATTERS: DESIGNING WITH CIRCADIAN HEALTH IN MIND...

Jun 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Ed Clark and Marty Brennan  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Courtesy Benjamin Benschneider GSA Federal Center South, Seattle, Washington. ZGF Architects. “Architecture is the masterly, correct and magnificent play of volumes brought together in light.” —Le Corbusier You may wonder why daylight is relevant to our modern building culture. Consider that human beings lived in close relationship to sunlight well into the 20th century. We woke to a reddish sunrise, spent the day in blueish light, with the peak intensity at midday, and fell asleep to the reddish sunset or the warm red glow of firelight. Given centuries of this primordial pattern, it’s no coincidence that the shifts in color during the day regulate our physiology, at all scales, even at cellular levels. Views and daylight have been scientifically illustrated to both reduce the length of time to...

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LARGEST NET-ZERO PLUS COMMERCIAL RETROFIT IN THE U.S. OPENS IN LOS ANGELES...

Jun 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] According to reports, commercial buildings in Los Angeles are expected to produce an increasing amount of carbon emissions at the fastest rate compared to all other typologies. They already account for around 65 percent of the city’s energy use. To combat the potential environmental impact, new construction standards in California will require all commercial structures to be built as net-zero buildings by 2030. Related: The Passive House Standard Will Now Recognize Net Zero and Energy Plus Buildings The NetZero Plus Electric Training Institute (NZP-ETI) retrofit will generate more energy than it will consume each year, thanks to its onsite, roof-mounted solar array. Excess energy will be stored in the building’s battery storage system and fed back into the electric grid system. The multi-million dollar retrofit cuts total energy consumption by 51 percent, and...

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NORTH AMERICA’S FIRST FULLY PREFABRICATED PASSIVE HOUSES COULD REVOLUTIONIZE THE HOUSING MARKET...

Jun 13, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] /north-americas-first-fully-prefabricated-passive-houses-could-revolutionize-the-housing-market/#popup-847129″ data-idx=”1″ data-postid=”847129″>View Slideshow A brilliant new partnership announced today could revolutionize the way Americans build their homes. Ecocor has teamed up with sustainability-minded design firm Richard Pedranti Architect (RPA) to design and build North America’s most energy-efficient prefab Passive Houses starting with eleven model home designs. The factory-built homes not only give Americans the opportunity to buy a super insulated, energy-efficient home at what we presume will be an affordable price, but will also allow them to modify and customize their eco-friendly home to their tastes with ease. The Ecocor-RPA partnership launched today with the unveiling of eleven prefabricated passive house model home designs that range from a 323-square-foot one-bedroom cabin to a 2,685-square-foot three to four-bedroom house. Passive House, a term which refers to a set of rigorous standards for ultra...

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DESIGN FOR THE ONE PERCENT

Jun 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Contemporary architecture is more interested in mega projects for elites than improving ordinary people’s lives. by Alex Cocotas  JACOBIN MAGAZINE A mock-up of Zaha Hadid’s proposal for Japan’s new national stadium. ForgeMind ArcheMedia / Flickr Our new issue, “Between the Risings,” is out now. To celebrate its release, international subscriptions are $25 off, and limited prints of our Easter 1916 cover are available. Zaha Hadid, a pioneering architect and the first female recipient of the Pritzker Prize, died in March at the age of sixty-five. Her vision and ambition have been rightfully celebrated around the world in the weeks since. But her passing also offers a moment to reflect critically on the state of contemporary architecture. Not so long ago, the world’s leading architects debated how architecture could be used to transform society by providing...

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CHANGING SKYLINE: WHAT WESTERN ARCHITECTS CAN LEARN FROM AFRICA...

Jun 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Kéré created a demonstration project for the Perelman Building atrium. Brightly colored parachute cords are suspended from mosquito net By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic Francis Kéré had to travel long and far from his tiny farming village in Burkina Faso, an African nation that skirts the edge of the Sahara, before he ended up with a show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. As a boy of 7, he was sent away to a larger town to attend school. Later, he made his way to Germany to study architecture. In 2001, he took his design skills back to his village and fashioned a modern school out of handmade mud bricks. That one-story structure may look like a simple little schoolhouse – albeit one with a rakishly tilted metal roof – but its...

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DSDHA adds crystalline pavilions on fitzrovia apartment rooftops...

Jun 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   all images © hélène binet / christoffer rudquist / DSDHA       providing private green space and a rooftop with views over central london, DSDHA architects collaborated with property developers derwent london to conceive the ‘corner house’ apartments. set in a black bricked building, the monolithic scheme is comprised of six-storeys. nine private apartments and two affordable units – all capitalise on high ceilings, views and natural daylighting, along with with a commercial space on the ground floor. the aim was to highlight the original structures; consolidating their identities into a single block that reflects the urban hierarchy       the london-based practice describes the development as ‘a new type of contemporary beauty, one which is less ostentatious yet captivating, capable to build on the qualities of its location to provide...

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MECANOO PLANS TO UNITE NEW KAOHSIUNG STATION WITH LANDSCAPED CANOPY...

Jun 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] all images courtesy of mecanoo       dutch architecture studio mecanoo has revealed plans for an important transport hub in taiwan’s second largest city. the new kaohsiung station features an organic, curvilinear shape with a landscaped canopy that offers a generous amount of public space. this area of greenery both unifies different modes of transport, and represents kaohsiung’s desire to be a sustainable city. the scheme forms the centerpiece of the vast kaohsiung metropolitan area underground railway project, which includes seven subterranean stations along a 9.75 kilometer (6 mile) railway tunnel. the planned transportation hub integrates train, metro, and bus services, and accommodates the needs of taxis and bicycles. the station features an organic, curvilinear shape, with a landscaped canopy       as a main point of arrival, mecanoo’s above-ground station...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (MAY 16-31)...

Jun 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT   J.R. Taylor NYC park overhaul / Chang W. Lee, The New York Times Meet the Garden Designer Who Transformed Rio de Janeiro – Wired, 5/18/16 “’You can’t talk about Rio de Janeiro without talking about Burle Marx,’ says Claudia Nahson, a curator at the Jewish Museum in New York City. ‘He shaped the city with public works.’” The Hudson River Will Soon Have New Look as Construction Begins on Thomas Heatherwick’s Pier 55 – Architectural Digest, 5/19/16 “The look of New York City’s waterfront—all 520 miles of it—has been steadily changing over the past few decades, with gritty industrial strips being transformed into recreational landscapes.” Sites of Demolished Detroit Homes Used to Soak Up Water – The Detroit News, 5/19/16 “But Detroit’s water department and Land Bank Authority as well as...

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A VISION FOR EQUITABLE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT...

Jun 8, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT   BY Jared Green Mural, Village of Arts and Humanities / Jared Green In the 1960s, amid rampant gang violence, drug crime, and white flight, Arthur Hall, a dancer and choreographer, created the Ile Ife Black Humanitarian Center in the poor and mostly African American community of Fairchild-Hartranft in north Philadelphia. The center successfully taught black culture, art, dance, and music in a safe space for decades. Then, in the 1980s, Lily Yeh, an art professor at the Philadelphia School of Fine Arts, got involved and grew the center into a neighborhood arts and cultural hub, the internationally-renowned Village of Arts & Humanities, which now teaches over 400 local students art, advocacy, and leadership after school every day. Aviva Kapust, the current executive director of the Village, gave a tour of the...

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TIMELY, URBAN, AND CONTEXTUAL: THE VENICE ARCHITECTURE BIENNALE’S MOST THOUGHT-PROVOKING PAVILLIONS...

Jun 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Vanessa Quirk The theme of this year’s Venice Biennale, curated by Alejandro Aravena, was a clarion call for architects around the world: go to the front lines of architecture, report back with your findings. The results were tremendous, with architects exposing relevant, important projects happening in every corner of the globe, from the Amazon rainforest, to the coast of Nigeria, to the streets of Detroit. The following five exhibitions stood out by marrying beautiful design with thought-provoking and timely content. Dutch Pavilion BLUE: Architecture of UN Peacekeeping Missions Malkit Shoshan, founder of the architecture think tank FAST and curator of the Dutch pavilion, has spent the past decade researching the intersections between architecture, politics, and human rights, particularly in conflict zones. For this year’s biennale, Shoshan examined the UN’s bases around the world, which have...

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LIBERLAND MAY BE THE WORLD’S FIRST SOVEREIGN NATION POWERED BY ALGAE...

Jun 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Tafline Laylin  INHABITAT View Slideshow A proposal for an algae-powered city has won the design competition for Liberland, the world’s newest sovereign nation in Europe. A 2.7 square mile patch of land located in a floodplain on the Danube River between Croatia and Serbia, Liberland presents a unique challenge for architects and urbanists tasked with designing a self-governing micro-nation that guarantees its citizens economic and personal freedom. RAW-NYC tackled the challenge with a deep green mixed-use city design that stacks horizontal layers vertically to accommodate population expansion. The winning proposal is a pedestrian-friendly design that supports a growing populace with stackable horizontal structures. Called Inverted Archeology, this groundbreaking technique constructs the city-state in consecutive temporal layers to form a self-sufficient, compact, dense, integrated and resilient urban fabric. Algae, strains of which don’t...

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ALONG THE SILK ROAD, A CITY BUILT ON SAND IS A MONUMENT TO CHINA’S PROBLEMS...

May 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Simon Denyer  THE WASHINGTON POST In Lanzhou New Area, recently completed apartment buildings await residents. (Gilles Sabrié/For The Washington Post) LANZHOU NEW AREA, China —This city is supposed to be the “diamond” on China’s Silk Road Economic Belt — a new metropolis carved out of the mountains in the country’s arid northwest. But it is shaping up to be fool’s gold, a ghost city in the making. Lanzhou New Area, in Gansu province, embodies China’s twin dreams of catapulting its poorer western regions into the economic mainstream through an orgy of infrastructure spending and cementing its place at the heart of Asia through a revival of the ancient Silk Road. Hundreds of hills on the dry, sandy Loess Plateau were flattened by bulldozers to create the 315-square-mile city. But today, cranes stand...

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ARCHITECTURE ISN’T THE VILLAIN OF “HIGH-RISE” — WE ARE...

May 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Zach Mortice  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE In High-Rise, the titular luxury residential tower is crowned by an elaborate roof garden, complete with a thatch-roofed cottage. ©StudioCanal For a different take on High-Rise, see our review of the film. In Ben Wheatley’s High-Rise, the first film adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s novel, you get the entire litany of architecture-run-amok as it appears in virtually any cultural product. There’s the architect as mad visionary, capable of bringing astounding visions of the future into the present but unable to dictate their evolution once human imperfection intervenes. There’s the mania of stacking too many people too high into the sky. And there’s the reckless and ignorant call to knock it all down and build again, tabula rasa, when it all falls apart. All this is packaged in a set of aesthetics typical of...

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DYSTOPIA IN THE SKY

May 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] y The first film adaptation of J.G. Ballard’s classic novel “High-Rise” is a decadent romp set against a background of Brutalism. Shumi Bose  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE The Brutalist high-rises in Ben Wheatley’s new film were inspired in part by Ernö Goldfinger’s Trellick and Balfron towers in London. Courtesy Magnolia Pictures For architects, if I may generalize an entire professional community, there are few novelists as cultishly beloved as J.G. Ballard. Borges or Calvino have their fair share of admirers, but to borrow an adjective more frequently applied to buildings, Ballard is the most iconic of literary figures—especially for readers of a concrete-expansion-joint persuasion. Witnessing war as a child, training in medicine, and thereafter writing from a rather bloodless middle-class patch of suburbia, Ballard spun tales of urban life that continue to be uncomfortably visceral. High-Rise was published...

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