More Thoughts on Jane Jacobs from One of Her Closest Collaborator...

Aug 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Opinion By Roberta Brandes Gratz   COMMON EDGE.ORG It was refreshing to read Martin C. Pedersen’s 10 Lessons Learned from Rereading Jane Jacobs and see that he didn’t perpetrate some of the common myths about her (i.e. she wanted every neighborhood to be like Greenwich Village; she didn’t like tall buildings; or, even more preposterously, she was somehow to blame for the ills of gentrification).   And while Jane’s life on Hudson Street does indeed seem like a lost world, is there any urban neighborhood—anywhere—that hasn’t changed in the past fifty seven years? Wouldn’t it be smarter to explore the whys of that change in a broad and relevant context? Shouldn’t we be exploring why the children of suburbia now crave urban living? Shouldn’t we demystify “gentrification” to understand different forms of change, some of...

read more

A Letter to Prospective Architecture School Parents...

Aug 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Eva Hagberg Fisher   COMMON EDGE.ORG Is your child suddenly wearing angular clothes and pretending to need glasses and talking about things like maylines (sorry, forgot we’re not in the 90’s anymore) and 3d-printing and the power of the research lab to change the world studio? Has your child started rejecting your Frank Lloyd Wright photo books and started asking for that super sweet punched-out Chora L Works thing that makes no sense to you because there are literally holes in it? Has your child refused to go on anymore holiday house tours because, seriously mom, this is what I do all day at school? Then congratulations! You now have an architecture school student child. And as much as we have—and need—the framework of, say, Adult Children of Alcoholics, just as deeply do...

read more

Germany is building world’s largest passive housing complex with 162 green units...

Aug 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   by Lacy Cooke   INHABITAT View Slideshow In Germany, the world’s biggest passive housing complex is currently under construction. The solar-powered Heidelberg Village designed by Frey Architekten will comprise 162 units and a host of sustainable features, including rooftop and vertical gardens. Heidelberg Village, Wolfgang Frey, Frey Architekten, Heidelberg Village by Frey Architekten, community, passive housing, passive housing complex, sustainable architecture, architecture, design, energy efficiency, energy efficient architecture, passive architecture Frey Architekten founder Wolfgang Frey designed the complex so a wide variety of people could live on the property. There’s a range of one bedroom apartments to apartments that can house families of four or five people. Each apartment will have its own balcony. Solar power and modern ventilation systems will allow the complex to be energy efficient. Vertical gardens and roof gardens...

read more

TO GET TO NET ZERO, THINK BIGGER...

Aug 20, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Allison Hibbs ROCKY MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE Guest Author The importance of implementing net zero at the district scale   The World Green Building Council (WGBC) just launched a revolutionary project calling for all buildings to reach net zero by 2050 in an action plan known as Advancing Net Zero. The announcement provides a shot in the arm to the net-zero design and construction industry at a global level, further increasing the impetus for governments, developers, and service providers to make ambitious net-zero commitments and action plans across the world. But it also requires the industry to confront a long-standing barrier—the assumption that net-zero buildings come at a significantly higher capital cost than business as usual. In fact, when approaching net-zero energy (NZE) at a district level and leveraging an integrative whole-systems design approach, the...

read more

artists build floating freedom cove off the coast of vancouver island...

Aug 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]     aug 12, 2016   off the coast of vancouver island, a curious and colorful complex floats amidst the calm waters of clayoquot sound. over the last 24 years, ‘freedom cove’ has been the home of canadian artists catherine king and wayne adams, who have built a multi-room dwelling as a sustainable and self-sufficient fortress.     off the grid on a homemade island video courtesy of great big story     video network great big story has recently documented the lives of king and adams at their floating paradise. a lengthy 45-minute boat ride to the nearest town, ‘freedom cove’ is tethered to shore with ropes, not anchors, making the entire habitat a buoyant and dynamic space. included in the complex is king and adam’s main living space, a dance floor, a lighthouse building and...

read more

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (August 1–15)...

Aug 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  J.R. Taylor Rail Deck Park / City of Toronto, via The Architect’s Newspaper Working to Make Public Space for Everyone in Baltimore – The Baltimore Sun, 8/1/16 “For writer D. Watkins, it’s a sense of exclusion from what he called the ‘new’ Baltimore. For student activist Diamond Sampson, it’s a feeling of being unwelcome around the Inner Harbor.” Will Replacing Thirsty Lawns with Drought-Tolerant Plants Make L.A. Hotter?  – The Los Angeles Times, 8/2/16 “Last summer, a revolution occurred in Los Angeles landscaping: Across the city, tens of thousands of homeowners tore up their water-thirsty lawns and replaced them with gravel, turf, decomposed granite and a wide range of drought-tolerant plants at a rate never seen before.” How Noted Landscape Architect Jim Burnett Counters Dallas’ Concrete Jungle – The Dallas Morning...

read more

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (July 16 – 30)...

Aug 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  J.R. Taylor Photograph by Simon Norfolk / Institute for the New Yorker Are Seawalls the Best Answer to Rising Sea Levels – or is Retreat a Better Option? – The Guardian, 7/18/16 “The extraordinary pictures of subsumed gardens and a swimming pool wrenched from the ground by the giant waves that battered Sydney’s northern beaches last month have revived debate about seawalls and the impact of human attempts to keep the rising ocean from our doors.” Cleveland’s Great New Public Spaces Helped Make RNC 2016 a Success – The Cleveland Plain Dealer, 7/22/16 “The Republican National Convention, where Trump gave his acceptance speech Thursday night, was a great, crashing success for its host city – and especially for the revitalized public spaces that framed the event and made it possible.” The...

read more

From Venice to Venice Beach: Denise Scott Brown’s “Wayward” Eye...

Aug 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The influential architect-planner reflects on her colorful and analytic use of photography over the decades. Denise Scott Brown  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Piazza San Marco, Venice, 1956 Photography by Denise Scott Brown The grande dame of architecture and planning has always relied on her camera as a critical tool. Her photography is currently showcased in the exhibition Wayward Eye: The Photography of Denise Scott Brown, on view at the Venice Architecture Biennale through November 27, and will be featured in a forthcoming publication by Metropolis Books. Here, Scott Brown offers a brief history of her photography, as well as a selection of her works. In September 1956, Robert Scott Brown and I arrived in Venice for the CIAM Summer School. We were passionate Modernists who agreed with English New Brutalist ideas for updating the movement....

read more

A GLOBAL ARCHITECTURE COMPETITION WITH NO TALL BUILDINGS IN SIGHT...

Aug 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Carlin Carr  COMMON EDGE The Versova-Madh Ferry in Mumbai prepares for departure. On the horizon is Versova Village, the subject of the Dencity Competition’s winning proposal.  (Photo by Suyogaerospace) The world is facing a housing crisis of monumental proportions: Over 1 billion people now live in slums, in makeshift homes that often lack even the most basic survival amenities. These self-built settlements have proliferated at a rapid pace due to a confluence of massive rural-to-urban migration and ad-hoc urban planning, particularly in developing countries. As a result, slums have become the only option for low-income families struggling to get by. If cities don’t address this need for affordable housing, the situation is only expected to get worse. By 2030, the number of slum dwellers is expected to double to 2 billion, an issue being...

read more

DONALD TRUMP AS ARCHITECTURE’S NIGHTMARE CLIENT...

Aug 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Duo Dickinson Not since Thomas Jefferson has there been a presidential candidate more involved in designing and building structures than Donald J. Trump. He has commissioned scores of architects to design millions of square feet in hundreds of locations. You would think that would make him the favorite of our profession: a building insider running the country? How could that be bad for architects?   Well, we kinda know this guy.   This is a bizarre election season in America: collectively we dislike both major candidates. One is a narcissistic caricature of himself, the other has had her “issues” for decades. Forget about political issues, this is identity politics at its most personalized. Few find warm and fuzzies with either.   But architects know one of these personalities: many of us work...

read more

Why Mexican Squares May Be the Best Public Spaces in the World...

Aug 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Dennis Pieprz How do you judge a public space? Is the prototypical, windswept plaza—a winner perhaps of countless design awards—a failure if it’s always empty? Or the row of food trucks parked on a sidestreet a success because it’s always teeming with life (and the wafting plumes of barbecue)? I’d argue that people always vote with their feet: spaces intended to be gathering places should be just that. Unlike evaluations of art and architecture, there’s nothing subjective about public space. Either a crowd shows or it doesn’t. And contrary to the best laid plans of mice and men (and landscape architects and urban designers), the public uses space in unpredictable and ingenious ways. The best urban places are often self-designed, semi-blank slates with a lot of room around the edges for civic...

read more

Your Green Home of the Future: The LivingHomes Model House...

Aug 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Take a sneak peek at this home of the future. By Natural Home staff LivingHomes (C.J. Berg/Sunshine Divis) Slideshow   The standard for green home building just got higher—and the magic number is zero. The LivingHomes model house, built in Santa Monica, California, is a zero-energy, zero-carbon, zero-waste, zero-water and zero-emissions residence—the first of its kind. The home is also the first to receive the U.S. Green Building Council’s highest LEED for Homes rating: Platinum. (LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). Here’s a sneak peak at the green home of tomorrow. www.LivingHomes.us • The home is located on an infill site that was minimally disturbed during construction. It’s within walking distance of public transportation, schools, businesses, parks and the beach. • The living roof garden reduces stormwater runoff, helps cool...

read more

ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS CAN CUT GAS IMPORTS...

Aug 3, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Paul Brown / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Making existing buildings in Europe more energy efficient could create a million new jobs. (Tapio Liller via Flickr) LONDON—A renovation programme to cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from buildings in Europe could create a million jobs, provide warmer homes, more comfortable factories and offices, reduce fuel bills across 28 countries, and cut imports of Russian gas, researchers say. This is because buildings are currently the biggest single emitter of GHGs in Europe. Many have inefficient heating and cooling, combined with poor insulation. But with existing technology and political will, they could be transformed into energy producers and become carbon-neutral, says a report produced by OpenEXP, an international group of experts helping policymakers to reach sustainable development goals. According to the report, written by...

read more

Breaking Ground: Using Housing to Reduce Health Care Costs...

Aug 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Vanessa Quirk   METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Images Courtesy Michael Moran Boston Road is the newest addition to the Breaking Ground family, a New York City-based organization that provides supportive housing (affordable housing with on-site mental health, health care, and job-training services) for both low-income working adults as well as formerly homeless single adults, many of whom suffer from HIV/AIDS or other mental or physical conditions. Simply put, Breaking Ground employs housing as a strategy for reducing health care costs.Their guiding philosophy is that putting “housing first” infinitely increases the likelihood that an individual can achieve sobriety, live healthier, and contribute actively to society. The philosophy seems to have merit as supportive housing has been proven to be remarkably cost-effective. Between emergency care, shelters, psychiatric hospitals, and jails, the average mentally-ill homeless person costs the city...

read more

THE BEST IN HEALTHCARE 2016

Aug 2, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Point of View Vanessa Quirk METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Courtesy Bruce Damonte The American Institute of Architects (AIA) Academy of Architecture for Health (AAH) has selected the seven recipients of the AIA National Healthcare Design Awards, granted to projects that “exhibit conceptual strengths that solve aesthetic, civic, urban, and social concerns as well as the requisite functional and sustainability concerns of a hospital.” Built Less than $25 million in construction cost Courtesy Bruce Damonte ​Kaiser Permanente, Kraemer Radiation Oncology Center Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design Anaheim, CA ​”The design provides a calming, nature oriented experience through the use of natural light, organic forms, outdoor views to nature, soothing interior colors, and an internal “Zen Garden” which contains a vibrant living wall garden visible from the treatment areas.” Courtesy Bruce Damonte Planned Parenthood Queens: Diane L. Max Health Center  Stephen Yablon Architecture Queens, New...

read more

In This Amazing City People Live Without Politics, No Religion And No Money...

Jul 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by GOSTICA · Upon learning this, you will think that happened long ago, but no. There is still a place to live, and not say for its scenery, but for their ideals as a society who do not follow the standards to which we are accustomed. In this town there is no money, no religion, no politics. This is truly a paradise to live. Think only in a place where there are none of these factors, where you can finally live in peace. This place exists and is called “Auroville”! It was founded in 1968 and was hailed as an international city by UNESCO, as its inhabitants are over 50 nationalities and different cultures. They coexist without any problem, since they have a political system, have no religion, and on top, do not use...

read more

Landscape Architecture in the News Highlights (July 1 – 15)...

Jul 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] J.R. Taylor THE DIRT Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times Conservation: Geniuses of Place – Nature.com, 7/6/16 “Ethan Carr traces the arc of influence in landscape creation and preservation from ‘Capability’ Brown to Frederick Law Olmsted and the US National Park Service.” Playful Variation on Ring Forms Performance Space at Ragdale in Lake Forest – Chicago Tribune, 7/8/16 “There’s something about a ring, the kind that gathers people in a circle. From Stonehenge to the layered-stone ‘council rings’ of landscape architect Jens Jensen, circular open-air structures have long liberated us from the straight lines of everyday life and created places for shared experience.” Imagine if the 2 Freeway Ended in a Brilliantly Colored, Eco-Smart Park – The Los Angeles Times, 7/11/16 “There are two ways you can look at the long spur of the...

read more

Interview with Toody Maher on Co-Designing Parks with the Community...

Jul 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  Jared Green Toody Maher / SF Gate Toody Maher is the founder and executive director of Pogo Park. She is an artist, inventor, and entrepreneur and lives in the San Francisco Bay Area, California. In the Iron Triangle in Richmond, California, which is one of the poorest and most violent neighborhoods in the country, you’ve created an exciting model, which combines community development, child development, play, and parks. What are the essential elements of a Pogo Park? Any public space can be transformed into a Pogo Park. In essence, a Pogo Park is an amazing place, a magical place for children to play. There are five key elements. First of all, a Pogo Park must be staffed. You need someone there who clean the park, welcome folks as they come in,...

read more

The Best of the 21st Century: Architecture...

Jul 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Metropolis Magazine / July-August 2016 / The Best of the 21st Century: Architecture We asked leading practitioners to share their picks of the best projects of the past 16 years. The following is a curated list of architectural projects, both big and small, that have helped to define the cityscape of the new millennium.  Email  Print  Feed ©Naoya Hatakeyama ​Sendai Mediatheque​ ​Miyage, Japan (2001) Toyo Ito & Associates “What better way to usher in a new century than by issuing an elegantly crafted public building that willfully re-situates and quietly coalesces the quintessential architectural trajectories of the previous century—that of structure, core, and skin—a narrative neatly set afloat in 1915 by Le Corbusier’s Dom-ino rallying cry.” —Donald Chong, partner, Williamson Chong ©SANAA ​21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art Kanazawa, Japan (2004) SANAA “Embodying the holy grail of each...

read more

Antennae to Experience: What Bucky Fuller Taught Me...

Jul 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Buckminster Fuller’s daughter shares a previously unpublished essay and reveals a rarely spotlighted side to the revered thinker. Allegra Fuller Snyder   METROPOLIS MAGAZINE Allegra Fuller Snyder and her father, Buckminster Fuller, in the 1950s. All Images Courtesy The Estate of R. Buckminster Fuller —On the occasion of Bucky’s 100th birthday, July 12, 1995 My father was a warm, concerned, and sharing father. As focused as he was on his own work, he nevertheless included me in his experiences and his experiencing. I remember with great clarity when I was about four years old, I was sick in bed, and he was taking care of me. He sat down on the bed beside me with his pencil in hand and told me—through wonderful freehand drawings—a Goldilocks story. I was Goldilocks, and with his pencil he transported...

read more

14 to 1: Post-Katrina Architecture by the Numbers...

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The postdiluvian landscape contains little cutting-edge design but rather an abundance of familiarity and replication. What does this reveal about New Orleans society? Richard Campanella with Cassidy Rosen Musicians’ Village, a Habitat for Humanity project in New Orleans. [Tanya Lukasik] All human landscape has cultural meaning — no matter how ordinary. … All our cultural warts and blemishes are there, and our glories too. — F. Pierce Lewis, “Axioms of the Landscape,” 1976 Last year the world media converged noisily on New Orleans to mark the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. This year marked a quieter but still significant milestone: it’s been a decade since the actual start of the structural recovery, which began tentatively in early 2006. So this is an apt moment to assess the results. How have the citizens of...

read more

Hamburg Creates a Vibrant Neighborhood by Creating Spaces for People...

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Dennis Pieprz Cities develop over time. A relatively “new” city might be as old as a century. Any city or neighborhood younger than twenty years old, in urban design terms, is a newborn, a place in the-process-of-becoming. In Hamburg, Germany, a startling work in progress is underway, in Hafencity, a mixed-used district that when completed will be home to 12,000 residents and almost 40,000 office workers. In the early 1990s, as the 19th century Elbe River warehouse district fell into disuse, Hamburg officials began to reimagine the river islands that were once the bustling hub of the city. The new district, one of the largest urban redevelopments in Europe, has numerous community and cultural buildings, including the much delayed (and anticipated) Elbe Philharmonic Hall, by Herzog & De Meuron, located prominently at...

read more

How Brandcentric Architecture is Destroying Our Sense of Place...

Jul 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Ben Willis In 2013, an online game called Geoguessr caught fire across the social media landscape.  The user is placed in a randomly-selected Google street view—anywhere from a desolate stretch of highway in Alaska to the downtown streets of Monaco—and then asked to pinpoint on a map where in the world they have been dropped. It’s a Sherlock-Holmes-meets-Carmen-San-Diego style challenge that puts the regional identities of the world on digital display. The game has now received sponsorships from the likes of Lufthansa and the Intercontinental Hotels Group, which means I wasn’t the only person who experienced an extreme wanderlust while playing it. After a few minutes (or hours, if I’m being honest) playing Geoguessr, it became clear that the most difficult landscapes to pinpoint are, in fact, the landscapes that many of...

read more

David Hertz’s Los Angeles Oasis...

Jul 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The architect and environmentalist is known for repurposing materials. Now a new device is helping him turn air into water. By Sheila Marikar   NEW YORKER MAGAZINE The L.A. architect and environmentalist David Hertz has a knack for repurposing stuff: planks of wood into skateboards, the wings of a Boeing 747 into the roof of a house, crushed LPs (smashed by teens in a gang intervention program) into flooring for a record label’s headquarters. But when a former client told him, last year, that he knew a guy who had invented a way to turn air into water, Hertz was incredulous. “I was, like, sure, let’s try it,” Hertz said. “It sounds like alchemy. And it sounds too good to be true, but let’s try it.” Hertz connected with Richard Groden, a general contractor...

read more

WHY CITY PLANNERS LOVE PORTLAND...

Jul 5, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Dennis Pieprz Portland, Oregon is a poster child for urban geeks everywhere–and for good reason. It’s an urban design success story. (There aren’t a whole lot of American examples of that.) Dennis Pieprz, a design principal at Sasaki Associates, recently began work on a project there, and visited after a twenty year absence. “Portland has always been ahead of the country,” he says. “Think of the urban growth boundary, recycling programs, bike paths, investments in transit, the fine grained urban blocks.” Here he takes a close look at Portland’s Pearl District, a relatively new area rapidly transforming into a great urban neighborhood. –Martin C. Pedersen     “This is near Jamison Square, a remarkable public space (designed by Peter Walker Associates) in the Pearl District,” Pieprz says. “It’s tough to imagine a...

read more

TADAO ANDO’S 152 ELIZABETH STREET IN NEW YORK INCLUDES A MONUMENTAL GREEN WALL...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]       ‘152 elizabeth street’ is an ultra luxury condominium building located in new york’s nolita neighborhood. designed by acclaimed japanese architect tadao ando, the scheme measures 32,000-square feet and comprises a total of seven stories and seven residences. each dwelling has been designed as a bespoke custom home, individually configured to highlight craft, detail, and quality. the living green wall measures 55 feet by 99 feet (17 x 30 meters) image by noë & associates and the boundary       developed by sumaida + khurana, ando is collaborating on the project with michael gabellini, the architect of record who is also designing the building’s interiors. in addition to ando’s signature poured-in-place concrete, the scheme also features a living green wall measuring 55-feet-high and 99-feet-wide — one of the largest in...

read more

PENDA POSES GREEN-FILLED SKY VILLA RESIDENCES IN INDIA...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]         penda has shared the latest development for his magic breeze project in hyderabad / india with the proposal of a residential idea of a ‘house with a garden’ to complement the maze-like garden landscape. the 450,000 square foot development is composed of 127 units; designed as duplex sky villas with each unit divided from its neighbor by a double-height, private garden. these green ‘in-between spaces’ create a sense of openness and vitality to the compound and loosens up the density a tenant would experience in a common condominium building. the complex would be composed of residential 127 units       for the project, penda developed a modular planter system that would be installed as an extension for the balconies of each unit. each planter can be filled with...

read more

HOW FRANK GEHRY’S L.A. RIVER MAKE-OVER WILL CHANGE THE CITY AND WHY HE TOOK THE JOB...

Jun 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The 6th Street Bridge over the L.A. River; famed architect Frank Gehry has been working for about a year on a wide-ranging new plan for the river, with the focus on hydrology, not architectural landmarks. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times) Christopher Hawthorne  LA TIMES Frank Gehry and the Los Angeles River: It’s a combination that makes zero sense (if you’re looking strictly at Gehry’s resume) and follows a natural logic (if you think about the interest the architect’s work has long shown in L.A.’s linear infrastructure and its overlooked, harder-to-love corners). And it might give Mayor Eric Garcetti a way to confront the growing conventional wisdom that he is sometimes paralyzed by caution, gun-shy about big-ticket or controversial efforts to remake the city. The 86-year-old Gehry has been working for about a...

read more

THE RESURGENCE OF DOWNTOWN DETROIT...

Jun 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   THE DIRT  BY Jared Green John Varvatos boutique, downtown Detroit / John Varvatos “The opportunities Detroit has today are a logical evolution from its past mistakes and disinvestment. To an extent, change wouldn’t be possible without that,” explained Kent Anderson, ASLA, founder of KH Anderson, in a tour of downtown Detroit during the Congress for New Urbanism (CNU). He added that Detroit native Dan Gilbert, the founder and owner of Quicken Loans, who has bought up nearly 80 buildings downtown over the past decade, is largely responsible for the resurgence today. “Gilbert recognized the time was right for setting a new direction.” Anderson raced us through a tour of downtown, explaining the history of the area and how the city got to where it is today. We raced in part because almost...

read more