HEROIC FOOD FARM GIVES VETERANS A NEW MISSION AS FARMERS GROWING SUSTAINABLE FOOD...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] “To be a good farmer, you have to be really good at a lot of things,” says Leora Barish, founder of non-profit veteran farming organization Heroic Food. “What [people] don’t realize is that veterans are great for farms and farming and for our food supply because they have a work ethic like nobody’s business and they have the endurance and they have the mission drive and grit and everything else that are required to start a farm.” Barish started the Heroic Food Farm in the spring of 2015 as a vehicle for teaching and training military veterans in sustainable farming so that they can utilize their unique skills in a new way. Inhabitat recently visited the farm, located just outside of Hudson, NY, to find out more about its inspiring mission as the...

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GROWING POWER GROWS FISH, VEGGIES, AND COMMUNITY WITH AQUAPONIC FARM...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Greg Beach   INHABITAT Gardeners and farmers who live in colder climates are well aware of the limitations posed by a short growing season. But these challenges often yield outstanding innovative practices, such as those used by Growing Power in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Growing Power harnesses natural cycles to power a farm that produces over one million pounds of food every year. Because of its ultra efficient greenhouse system, Growing Power is able to continue its harvest even through the frigid Great Lakes winters. Will Allen, the founder of Growing Power, created an aquaponics system that captures energy produced by natural systems. The greenhouses are heated by indoor compost piles, which generate heat as they break down organic matter. These compost pile heaters are also an excellent source of fertile soil for growing high-quality vegetables...

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THERE’S A HUGE PROBLEM WITH THE NEW FOOD GUIDELINES THAT NO ONE IS TALKING ABOUT...

Jan 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] And it poses a big threat to health. —By Nick Stockton MOTHER JONES Climate change: It’s what’s for dinner. MaraZe/Shutterstock This story originally appeared in Wired and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. Every five years, the government tries to tell Americans what to put in their bodies. Eat more vegetables. Dial back the fats. It’s all based on the best available science for leading a healthy life. But the best available science also has a lot to say about what those food choices do to the environment, and some researchers are peeved that new dietary recommendations released yesterday seem to utterly ignore that fact. Broadly, the 2016-2020 dietary recommendations aim for balance: More veggies, leaner meats, try some fish! Oh, and eat way less sugar, no more than...

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HERE’S NEW NEWS ABOUT PESTICIDES AND BEES...

Jan 7, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Nathanael Johnson Bees are struggling, and several environmental organizations want to try to help them out by banning neonicotinoid pesticides. Now the EPA has published an assessment showing that one particular neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid, hurts bees. If you know about the travails of bees, but you’re a normal person who doesn’t follow this stuff obsessively, you are probably thinking one of two things: 1. Wait, haven’t we known for years that neonics are killing bees? 2. Wait, I thought I heard that neonics weren’t the problem! Does this prove that they actually are? Each of these starting places is part right, but also part wrong — so let’s back up one step. Background First, it’s crucial to zero in on what “killing bees” means. There’s a lot of overheated rhetoric about honeybees going extinct; that’s just not happening. There’s also...

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THE ‘UNFOLDING GLOBAL DISASTER’ HAPPENING RIGHT UNDER OUR FEET...

Dec 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   With all that’s going on in the world — from record-breaking warm spells to rapidly melting ice sheets — it’s easy to ignore something so seemingly mundane as dirt. But scientists at the University of Sheffield’s Grantham Center for Sustainable Futures suggest that we ignore dirt at our own peril. Nearly a third of the world’s arable land has been lost over the past four decades, according to a new report, released to coincide with the Paris climate talks earlier this month. Experts at the the University of Sheffield called this soil loss “an unfolding global disaster” that directly threatens the agricultural productivity of the planet. But soil erosion isn’t just a problem for food security — which is expected to become even more pressing...

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FROM HALIBURTON TO WALMART, THESE BIG CORPORATIONS WILL MAKE MONEY OFF OF CLIMATE CHANGE...

Dec 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock GRIST By Jeremy Schulman This story was originally published by Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.Climate change will have some pretty terrifying consequences. Experts have predicted everything from deadly heatwaves and devastating floods to falling crop production and even increased political instability and violence. But according to some of the world’s biggest companies, these future disasters could also present lucrative business opportunities.In a remarkable series of documents submitted to a London-based nonprofit called CDP, big-name corporations describe global warming as a chance to sell more weapons systems to the military, more air conditioners to sweltering civilians, and more medications to people afflicted by tropical diseases. CDP, which stands for “Carbon Disclosure Project,” asks companies all over the world to disclose information about their greenhouse gas...

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SEVEN REASONS 2015 WAS THE SWEETEST YEAR YET FOR SAVING BEES...

Dec 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Thanks to policy changes and pesticide bans, the dwindling bee population is finally getting some much-needed protection. (Photo: Flickr) Dec 15, 2015 Nicole Mormann is TakePart’s editorial fellow. She covers a variety of topics, including social justice, entertainment, lifestyle, and environment.   We may have run for the hills as kids if we saw a few bees buzzing nearby, but without them, we wouldn’t have been able to enjoy some important staple foods growing up: Apples, avocados, almonds, blueberries, cherries, and pumpkins—these are just a sampling of the many crops that rely on the pollination power of bees. Bees pollinate more than $15 billion worth of U.S. crops each year, and yet massive bee die-offs in recent years are costing the economy an estimated $5.7 billion annually, not to mention the possible loss...

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THE MYSTICAL POWERS OF MUSHROOMS...

Dec 19, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The Mystical Powers of Mushrooms Dr. David Suzuki |ECO WATCH Until 1969, biologists thought mushrooms and other fungi were plants. They’re actually more closely related to animals, but with enough differences that they inhabit their own distinct classification. This and more recent findings about these mysterious organisms illustrate how much we have yet to learn about the complexities of the natural world. New research reveals mushrooms can even help plants communicate, share nutrients and defend themselves against disease and pests.  There’s far more to mushrooms than the stems and caps that poke above ground. Photo credit: Shutterstock There’s far more to mushrooms than the stems and caps that poke above ground. Most of the organism is a mass of thin underground threads called mycelia. These filaments form networks that help plants, including trees, connect...

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Starbucks’ Deforestation-Free Pledge Is a Total Joke...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The world’s largest coffeehouse company needs to wake up and smell the coffee. By Elliot Negin / The Huffington Post   VIA ALTERNET   SCARSDALE, NY – SEPTEMBER 15, 2013: A tall Starbucks coffee in front of a woman working on a laptop computer. Photo Credit: Sean Wandzilak / Shutterstock.com Starbucks has a bigger problem than the controversy over its new red holiday cup. It’s still buying palm oil and other agricultural products that might be linked to tropical forest destruction, and a coalition of science, environmental and labor organizations isn’t happy about it. Today that coalition sent a letter to Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz (above) urging him to strengthen his company’s procurement policy to ensure it doesn’t contribute to deforestation, a significant cause of global warming. The commodities in question include wood, paper products and palm oil,...

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Dozens of Nations Back Regenerative Farming Initiative That Can Help Solve Global Warming...

Dec 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Food The U.S.—a primary driver of the climate crisis—still isn’t on board with this historic climate agreement. By Katherine Paul, Ronnie Cummins / AlterNet Photo Credit: GlebStock/Shutterstock.com France, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, the U.K., Germany and Mexico are among more than two dozen countries that have signed on to an agreement that one day may be recognized as the most significant climate initiative in history.France’s 4/1000 Initiative: Soils for Food Security and Climate puts regenerative food and farming front and center in the climate solutions conversation. This is why the Organic Consumers Association, its Mexico affiliate Via Organica, IFOAM Organics International and more than 50 other activist allies across the globe have signed on in support of the Initiative. Unfortunately, the U.S. government is not yet on board with the plan, even though our...

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DESIGN WITH EVERY BEE IN MIND

Nov 21, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT by Heidi Petersen The natural habitats of pollinators are increasingly fragmented. The overwhelming majority of American agricultural landscapes use chemical pesticides and fertilizers. These factors contribute to the declining health of bees. At the ASLA 2015 Annual Meeting in Chicago, Heather Holm, Holm Design and Consulting; Danielle Bilot, Associate ASLA, Kudela & Weinheimer; Laurie Davies, executive director of the Pollinator Partnership; and James Schmelzer, building operations and management, General Services Administration (GSA) showed how landscape architects and designers can better design for bees. As Holm explained, 81 percent of plants are pollinated by insects, birds, or mammals. Of those plants, 33 percent are food crops. Most people’s idea of a pollinator is the honeybee, a domesticated insect integral to modern U.S. agriculture. Hives of these bees are shipped throughout the country,...

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A SCORCHING EARTH THREATENS U.S. AGRICULTURE...

Nov 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network/  VIA TRUTHDIG     Wildfires such as this one in Arizona pose a serious risk to topsoil. (Brady Smith / U.S. Forest Service / Coconino via Flickr) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—A deadly mix of prolonged drought and wildfire, driven by climate change, could do more than just lay waste to crops and woodland in the western US. It could scorch the earth and trigger ever greater levels of soil erosion. Joel Sankey a researcher at the US Geological Survey, told the Geological Society of America’s annual meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, that by 2050 an increase in wildfires may double soil erosion in some western states. As a consequence, soil would blow or be washed into water courses. He and his...

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TERRACE FARMING: AN INDIGENOUS MODEL FOR FOOD SECURITY...

Nov 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Marianela Jarroud, Inter Press Service | Report Terraces built by Atacameño Indians in the village of Caspana in Alto Loa, in the northern Chilean region of Antofagasta. This ageold farming technique represents an adaptation to the climate, and ensures the right to food of these Andes highlands people. (Photo: Marianela Jarroud / IPS) Caspana, Chile – Terrace farming as practiced from time immemorial by native peoples in the Andes mountains contributes to food security as a strategy of adaptation in an environment where the geography and other conditions make the production of nutritional foods a complex undertaking. This ancient prehispanic technique, still practiced in vast areas of the Andes highlands, including Chile, “is very important from the point of view of adaptation to the climate and the ecosystem,” said Fabiola Aránguiz. “By...

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CLIMATE CHANGE WILL STRESS OUT PLANTS. THESE SCIENTISTS THINK THEY HAVE A SOLUTION...

Nov 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Rusty Rodriguez and Regina Redman Industrial Evolution By Suzanne Jacobs   GRIST Just east of the University of Washington campus, along a busy thoroughfare, behind a rundown strip of retail space, up a flight of rusty stairs, there’s a glass door. Inside, past a cramped office overflowing with books, a couple of computers, and a bare-bones kitchen, there’s a lab.This, a hole in the wall on the north edge of Seattle, is where plants go to get superpowers. And by superpowers, I mean a fungal infection. But trust me — this is like the radioactive spider bite of fungal infections. It all started more than 15 years ago, when Rusty Rodriguez and Regina Redman, a husband-and-wife team of biologists, went to Yellowstone National Park to study the microbes living in hot geothermal soils. They wanted...

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POWERING APPALACHIA’S BRIGHTER FUTURE...

Nov 4, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Susanna Hegner, Southern Currents | News Analysis Coalfield communities are getting a much-needed jolt. On October 15, the Partnerships for Opportunity and Workforce and Economic Revitalization (POWER) Initiative announced its first round of grants for communities in 12 states and tribal regions affected by changes in the coal industry and energy sector. The $14.5 million is aimed at helping diversify economies, create jobs, attract new sources of investment and provide skills training for high-quality employment. The POWER effort aligns a range of programs and resources through the Commerce Department, the Labor Department, the Small Business Administration and the Appalachian Regional Commission. The bulk of the first round of funding is going to Kentucky and West Virginia, the two states most severely affected by the downturn in the coal industry. In those...

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COULD BEER SAVE THE HONEYBEES?

Oct 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: wikimedia commons   The fight to save honeybees has gotten boosts recently from the USDA, the White House, and researchers who are still working to determine why managed honeybees continue to die off. Now, bees have one more thing on their side: beer. Or, at least, one of the main ingredients of beer. This week, the EPA approved the use of potassium salts of hops beta acids (HBAs) — a biochemical (or naturally-occurring) pesticide that’s derived from hops, the flowers of the plant Humulus lupulus — around honeycombs. Research has shown that HBAs have potential for repelling varroa mites, a dangerous mite that attaches itself to honeybees and sucks out their circulatory fluid. Varroa mites weaken bees and spread debilitating diseases, including deformed wing virus, which causes...

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SUSTAINABLE OCEAN FARMING INNOVATORS WIN THE 2015 BUCKMINSTER FULLER CHALLENGE...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Design by Lucy Wang INHABITAT The Buckminster Fuller Institute just crowned the non-profit GreenWave winner of the 2015 Fuller Challenge for developing the world’s first multi-species 3D ocean farms – a type of sustainable aquaculture that produces high yields while restoring and improving the ocean’s ecosystems. The non-profit will receive a $100,000 grand prize towards the implementation of their work. Our oceans are being plundered. With recent studies suggesting that humans have caused marine populations to halve, largely due to overfishing, alternative solutions like those proposed by GreenWave are a lifeline to the billions of people who depend on the oceans’ biodiversity. GreenWave’s new approach to farming the seas rejects the traditional practice of growing vulnerable monocultures for a multi-layered system akin to a vertical underwater garden. GreenWave’s open-source strategy takes advantage of...

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INTERVIEW WITH STEVEN NYGREN – ON SERENBE – A FARM TO TABLE COMMUNITY...

Oct 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT   by Jared Green Steven Nygren is the founder of Serenbe, which has won numerous awards, including the Urban Land Institute Inaugural Sustainability Award, the Atlanta Regional Commission Development of Excellence, and EarthCraft’s Development of the Year. You founded Serenbe, a 1,000-acre community in the city of Chattahoochee Hills, which is 30 miles southwest of Atlanta, Georgia. In Serenbe, there are dense, walkable clusters of homes, shops, and businesses, even artists’ studios, modeled like English villages set within 40,000 acres of forest you helped protect. Can you briefly tell me the story of this community? What motivated you to create it? It was a reaction. We purchased 60 acres in a historic farm in 1991 just on a weekend whim while on a drive to show our children farm animals. It seemed...

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WHAT TPP MEANS FOR AGRICULTURAL GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS...

Oct 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Canadian dairy farmers campaigned hard to keep milk imports out.    REUTERS/Chris Wattie By Nathanael Johnson GRIST While the Trans-Pacific Partnership talks were in progress, I kept seeing headlines suggesting that negotiators might end protections for U.S. sugar producers. Of course that didn’t happen. There were also suggestions that Canada might throw open its highly regulated milk market. That didn’t happen either. The TPP opened North America’s door to imports of milk (in Canada) and sugar (in the U.S.), but just a crack. It seems that North American farmers are giving away very little, and getting a lot in return. The U.S. Grains Council hailed the agreement, and estimated that it would increase grains exports 11 percent. The meat industry is also happy. The Wall Street Journal said that agriculture was one of the...

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CARBON IS THE ROOT OF A NEW, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEM...

Oct 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Jared Green Turning the conventional wisdom on its head, Janine Benyus, author of Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature and founder of the Biomimicry Institute, argued that carbon dioxide pollution in the atmosphere can become the source of a new, regenerative agricultural system at SXSW Eco in Austin, Texas. Instead of treating carbon dioxide emissions as a waste product that needs to be reduced, it can instead fuel our food production. We can mimic the functions of prairie ecosystems to store all of that excess CO2 and create a more sustainable food production system. “Nature has no landfills; everything has a second life,” Benyus argued. Carbon dioxide is already the basis of a complex system of “upcycling” in nature. A tree absorbs carbon dioxide, sequestering it as it grows. When it dies, it’s decomposing trunk is...

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HONEY BEES ARE FACING A GLOBAL THREAT, AND IF THEY GO, SO DO WE...

Oct 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environmentalists and agribusiness are waging a pitched battle over the use of pesticides. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet   “There is one masterpiece, the hexagonal cell, that touches perfection. No living creature, not even man, has achieved, in the centre of his sphere, what the bee has achieved in her own: and were some one from another world to descend and ask of the earth the most perfect creation of the logic of life, we should needs have to offer the humble comb of honey.”— Maurice Maeterlinck, The Life of the Bee, 1924 What is the most important animal to humans? In prehistoric times, the dog helped transform early hunter-gatherers into apex predators. Later, human civilization was built on the backs of horses. But starting around 11,500 years ago, when humans began making...

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Monsanto’s Migraine: Big Fiascoes Facing the World’s Biggest Seed Company...

Oct 3, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment The problems are piling up at the company’s front door. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: a katz/Shutterstock.com Monsanto has been reeling from a number of setbacks around the globe. Here’s a look at some of the main reasons that 2015 has been a giant headache for the biotech giant. But that headache could find some reilef if the U.S. Senate hands them a legislative victory that would keep American consumers in the dark about what’s in their food. Roundup Probably Causes Cancer In March, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the World Health Organization’s cancer arm, said that the controversial herbicide glyphosate — the main ingredient in Monsanto’s popular weedkiller Roundup — is “probably carcinogenic to humans.” IARC noted, “Case-control studies of occupational exposure in the USA,...

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COULD THESE TWO ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES BE THE ANSWER TO EACH OTHER?...

Sep 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Gabriella Mulligan, Ensia | Report Sanergy hosts a marketing event in a Kenyan community to generate demand for the company’s produce – low-cost, hygienic sanitation centers that provide developing countries with a solution to the long-standing problem of sanitation. (Photo: Sanergy) Sub-Saharan Africa suffers from, and often epitomizes, many of the environmental challenges faced by the developing world. Two challenges – safe sanitation and sustainable fuel – are receiving increasing attention, with both included among the Sustainable Development Goals slated for launch by the United Nations later this month. As the development community works to solve them, the seed of an idea is beginning to sprout that the two could provide solutions to each other. The Sanitation Crisis More than 4.1 billion people around the world lack access to hygienic sanitation, according...

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FOREST LOSS AND LAND DEGRADATION FUEL CLIMATE CRISIS...

Sep 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford, Climate News Network     Agriculture and land use changes, such as in Indonesia, represent the second-largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. (GIZ) This Creative Commons-licensed piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—The planet’s forests have dwindled by 3%—equivalent almost to the land area of South Africa—in the last 25 years, according to a new assessment by the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation. While the planet continues to lose its forests—albeit at a slower rate—through felling, burning or being turned into farmland, another UN study predicts that the economic cost of degraded agricultural land in the form of lost ecosystem services now amounts to up to US$10 trillion a year. Within 10 years, 50 million people could have been forced to abandon their homes and livelihoods to become migrants. If all...

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THE MOST OBSCURE SPECIES COULD BE KEY TO SAVING THE PLANET...

Sep 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Scientists are starting to examine the role the tiniest critters play in preserving ecosystems. An earworm on an ear of corn. (Photo: Flickr)= Richard Conniff is the author of The Species Seekers: Heroes, Fools, and the Mad Pursuit of Life on Earth and other books. TAKE PART DAILY Odd bits of recent wildlife news, mostly about very small and obscure species, have lately left me thinking about a game called Jenga. If you happen never to have played it, here’s how it works: The game consists of small wooden blocks, and you start by assembling them into a tower, with each level consisting of three blocks laid horizontally and the layers arranged crisscross to one another. On each turn, a contestant removes one block and places it on top, the point being to...

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SEEDS HAVE BEEN WITHDRAWN FROM THE ARCTIC “DOOMSDAY” VAULT FOR THE FIRST TIME...

Sep 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Kif Leswing  FUTURISM 8 hours ago DoomsdayVault2_1024 In Brief International Centre for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas has requested 116,000 seed samples from a seed vault built into an island near the North Pole. The Breakthrough Normally, researchers in the Middle East would simply withdraw the seeds they need from a facility in Aleppo, Syria, but due to the instability in the region they can’t. So instead they’ve turned to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, which was formed in 2008 to save critical seeds and genetics from a natural or man-made disaster. Although the war in Syria might not be at the level of a nuclear war, it’s still the exact reason that the vault was built in the first place. The Implications: The vault has said the researchers will get their...

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LAND DEGRADATION, DESERTIFICATION MIGHT CREATE 50 MILLION CLIMATE REFUGEES WITHIN A DECADE...

Sep 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Avaneesh Pandey TRUTHDI Desertification — climate change-triggered degradation of land ecosystems — will, in a decade, create 50 million refugees, the Economics of Land Degradation (ELD), a global initiative led by 30 different research groups, warned. Pictured: Farmers prepare to plant grass to stabilise sand dunes at the edge of the Mu Us Desert in Lingwu, northwest China’s Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region October 19, 2007. Reuters/Stringer Desertification — climate change-triggered degradation of land ecosystems — might, in a decade, create 50 million refugees, the Economics of Land Degradation (ELD), a global initiative led by 30 different research groups, warned in a new study published Tuesday. The study, backed by the United Nations, also found that $6.3 trillion to $10.6 trillion worth of resources — equivalent to up to 17 percent of the...

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U.S. CHALLENGED TO REDUCE FOOD WASTE BY 50 PERCENT BY 2030...

Sep 17, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] “Twenty-one percent of all the waste in landfills is food.” By Karen Matthews HUFFINGTON POST GREEN ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK (AP) — Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced a goal Wednesday to cut the amount of food that Americans waste by 50 percent by 2030. “The United States enjoys the most productive and abundant food supply on Earth, so too much of this food goes to waste,” Vilsack said in New York City, where he was joined by food-industry representatives and officials from the Environmental Protection Agency. Vilsack likened the effort to reduce food waste to the anti-littering campaigns of the 1960s and `70s that shamed Americans for tossing trash out car windows. “This is the logical extension,” he said. “This is the next litter campaign.” The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that Americans...

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GLOBAL WARMING COULD LEAD TO WORLDWIDE WARS...

Sep 16, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   MARK KARLIN, EDITOR OF BUZZFLASH Will global warming lead to worldwide resource wars? (Photo: Environmental Illness Network) It would be a simplification to assert that the mass movement of refugees to Europe is currently primarily caused by global warming. As we’ve noted previously, wars of empire and economic deprivation have been the leading factors behind the recent surge of people struggling to reach the relative safety and economic stability of European Union nations. However, a September 9 article in the Guardian reports on the warning issued by the former head of Britain’s Liberal Democrats, Lord Paddy Ashdown, that “the world will undergo more resource wars and huge movements of desperate people unless it tackles climate change effectively.” Ashdown’s warning is based on both logical and scientific premises. If global warming damages or destroys the yield...

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SMARTER FOREST AND LAND-USE POLICY COULD HELP MAKE PARIS CLIMATE DEAL A SUCCESS...

Sep 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Ben Adler GRIST As the world gears up for the U.N. climate negotiations in Paris this December, almost all of the talk is about greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel burning. How much will countries cut their emissions? When will they commit to having their emissions peak? But there’s another major component that’s being neglected: the way we manage our forests and other lands, which can serve as carbon sinks. Big carbon polluters are failing to offer strong, specific plans for land use as part of the pledges they’re releasing ahead of the Paris talks, known as Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs), according to a new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists. The U.S. and the European Union ignored the land-use sector almost completely in their INDCs, says report coauthor Doug...

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