CHILDREN IN FARM COMMUNITIES PAY A STEEP PRICE FOR THE FOOD WE EAT...

May 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Civil Eats About the Writer Elizabeth Grossman is a senior reporter for Civil Eats focused on environmental and science issues. She is the author of Chasing Molecules, High Tech Trash, Watershed and other books. Her work has appeared in a variety of publications, including Scientific American, Environmental Health Perspectives, Yale e360, Ensia, High Country News, The Pump Handle, Chemical Watch, The Washington Post, TheAtlantic.com, Salon, The Nation, and Mother Jones. Photo courtesy of Bread for the World. Children in Farm Communities Pay a Steep Price for the Food We Eat The evidence linking pesticide exposure to childhood cancers and learning and behavioral problems has grown increasingly strong. By Elizabeth Grossman on May 10, 2016 Filed Under: Food Justice, Pesticides Subscribe  993  268 Tumblr1 Google +2  15 If you’re an urban parent, you might...

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WHY THERE’S A SEARING ETHIOPIAN DROUGHT WITHOUT AN EPIC ETHIOPIAN FAMINE...

May 15, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] governance By Andrew C. Revkin Photo Cattle are led in search of water in Ethiopia’s Oromia region.Credit Nancy McNally / Catholic Relief Services I hope you’ll read “Is the Era of Great Famine Over,” an Op-Ed article by Alex de Waal, the executive director of the World Peace Foundation at Tufts University, which has a program tracking famine trends. Filing from Ethiopia, which is in the midst of a potent drought but — for a change — not a calamitous famine, de Waal made these core points:  How did Ethiopia go from being the world’s symbol of mass famines to fending off starvation? Thanks partly to some good fortune, but mostly to peace, greater transparency and prudent planning. Ethiopia’s success in averting another disaster is confirmation that famine is elective because, at its...

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INTENSE FARMING PRACTICES CAN HELP SAVE WILDLIFE...

Apr 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Human population growth means we need to farm more efficiently so we don’t plow what’s left of the world’s natural habitat. (Photo: Chris Winsor/Getty Images) Richard Conniff is the author of House of Lost Worlds: Dinosaurs, Dynasties, and the Story of Life on Earth, and other books.   You probably don’t think agricultural intensification could ever be a good thing. And you certainly wouldn’t expect an argument for more of it in a column about wildlife. But here’s the deal: If we don’t figure out how to grow more food on less land, we’re going to have to plow under what little remains of the natural world and turn it into farmland. And we have to figure it out fast, because there are going to be 10 billion people to...

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THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON FUNGICIDES...

Apr 14, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Mark Sumner  DAILY KOS This guy might not be the only one who ends up in a fog. Science Matters Daily Kos While Republicans are actively trying to bring back DDT to please big agriculture, concern is growing about other pesticides and fungicides that are already out there. In your food. In your body. In your brain. … a team of University of North Carolina Neuroscience Center researchers led by Mark Zylka subjected mouse cortical neuron cultures—which are similar in cellular and molecular terms to the the human brain—to 294 chemicals “commonly found in the environment and on food.” The idea was to see whether any of them triggered changes that mimicked patterns found in brain samples from people with autism, advanced age, and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. This is initial research, and obviously mouse brain...

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Why Is the USDA Silencing Its Own Scientists’ Warnings About the Dangerous Effects of Pesticides?...

Apr 12, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Government whistleblowers are our first line of defense against unscrupulous companies and purchased politicians responsible for the poisoning of honeybees. By Evaggelos Vallianatos / AlterNet bee keeper with bee colony Photo Credit: Pazargic Liviu/Shutterstock [Editor’s note: Evidence has been mounting that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has been silencing its own bee scientists who have raised the alarm about the deadly impact that pesticides, particularly neonicotinoids, have on bees. Last month, for example, the Washington Post reported the story of Jonathan Lindgren, a USDA bee scientist, who filed a whistleblower suit alleging that he was disciplined to suppress his research. In 2014, Dr. Jeffery Pettis, another USDA bee scientist and beekeeping advocate, was demoted, leading several beekeeping and environmental organizations to express concern that the agency has actively suppressed bee science that...

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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN THE NEWS HIGHLIGHTS (MARCH 16-31)...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by J.R. Taylor A new public square in the Fawwar refugee camp in the West Bank, June 2014 / Adam Ferguson/The New York Times/Redux via NY Review of Books Municipality Updating Anchorage’s Dated Land Use Plan – Alaskan Public Media, 3/17/16 “The most-recent projections – which have been adjusted since the price of oil has declined – anticipate Anchorage’s population will grow between 15,000 and 45,000 people within the next 25 years.” A Closer Look at Oceanwide Center’s Proposed Public Open Space – Hoodline, 3/22/16 “The team behind the massive office, hotel and residential development proposed for First and Mission streets, Oceanwide Center, has grand plans for their open space requirement. If approved, 47 percent of the project’s ground-floor area will be privately-owned public open space, accessible to anyone.” Why Landscapers...

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TREATING SOIL A LITTLE DIFFERENTLY COULD HELP IT STORE A HUGE AMOUNT OF CARBON...

Apr 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Climate change is a massive problem with the potential to completely reshape the world, both literally (with rising sea levels and melting glaciers) and figuratively (with the way we grow food, or the way that we handle allergies). And while the consequences caused by climate change could be huge, the solutions — transitioning to a completely fossil fuel-free economy, or geoengineering — can often seem equally daunting. But what if something as simple as the dirt under your feet could help mitigate some of the worst of climate change? The Earth’s soils contain a lot of carbon, and helping to manage and restore them could be a key way to help tackle climate change, according to a recent study in Nature. Soils are already huge...

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One-Third of All Food Produced Globally Never Finds Its Way Onto a Plate...

Apr 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Food The majority of food waste ends up in landfills where it releases methane, a greenhouse gas 21 times stronger than carbon dioxide, into the atmosphere. By Nicole Mormann / EcoWatch  VIA ALTERNET April 8, 2016 It’s easy not to think about food waste when your rotting tomatoes and days-old casserole dishes are hidden away in the back of the refrigerator—out of sight, out of mind. But when it comes time to clean it out, you have to face a lot of waste food, money and the resources that took to produce it. While food waste has made a rapid rise in terms of public awareness recently, new research suggests that the future effect could end up accelerating climate changeat a worrisome rate in coming years. According to a study released Thursday by Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact...

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FOR THE FIRST TIME, A STATE JUST BANNED NEONICOTINOIDS, A PESTICIDE THREATENING POLLINATORS...

Apr 9, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   Bonnie Raindrop has been beekeeping for just nine years, but that’s been more than enough time to see the precipitous decline in bee populations that has been plaguing Maryland. Last year, according to the USDA, Maryland beekeepers lost 61 percent of their honeybee populations, which is two times higher than the national average. Over the last five or so years, Raindrop herself has witnessed crushing losses in her own hives, fluctuating between 50 and 100 percent. Which is why Raindrop is so happy that the Maryland legislature has started to take notice. Thursday night, the Maryland House and Senate agreed upon and jointly passed a final version of the Maryland Pollinator Protection Act, which would eliminate consumer use of neonicotinoids, a widely-used class of pesticides...

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We’ve Changed a Life-Giving Nutrient Into a Deadly Pollutant—Can We Change It Back?...

Apr 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   Environment In the process of producing food, we’ve inadvertently filled our planet with toxic forms of nitrogen. By Elizabeth Grossman / Ensia   VIA ALTERNET A lot of dead fish on the beach Photo Credit: Brandon Seidel/Shutterstock Coastal dead zones, global warming, excess algae blooms, acid rain, ocean acidification, smog, impaired drinking water quality, an expanding ozone hole and biodiversity loss. Seemingly diverse problems, but a common thread connects them: human disruption of how a single chemical element, nitrogen, interacts with the environment. Nitrogen is absolutely crucial to life — an indispensable ingredient of DNA, proteins and essentially all living tissue — yet it also can choke the life out of aquatic ecosystems, destroy trees and sicken people when it shows up in excess at the wrong place, at the wrong time, in...

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WILDFIRES, FLOODING AND EXTREME FARMING: CHECK OUT THESE ILLUMINATING NASA IMAGES OF EARTH...

Apr 6, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] NASA just released 2.95 million satellite images to the public VIDEO Peter Cooper  SALON.COM   Share Video Embed code Select Video link Select The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) was launched in 1999 and has photographer 99% of the Earth’s surface! The initial projection was a five year run but it has far surpassed that time frame and will continue to monitor Earth.  2.95 million images were made public on April 1st. Watch the above video to get a small taste of the...

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CLIMATE CHANGE IS SUCKING THE COLORADO RIVER DRY...

Apr 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By John Upton GRIST Cross-posted from ClimateCentral Even as the number of Americans relying on the Colorado River for household water swells to about 40 million, global warming appears to be taking a chunk out of the flows that feed their reservoirs. Winter storms over the Rocky Mountains provide much of the water that courses down the heavily tapped waterway, which spills through deep gorges of the Southwest and into Mexico. ow water levels in late 2014 at Lake Powell, which is a Colorado River water reservoir built along the border of Utah and Arizona.Low water levels in late 2014 at Lake Powell, which is a Colorado River water reservoir built along the border of Utah and Arizona.Jessica Mercer But flows in recent decades have been lighter than would have been expected...

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GENETICALLY MODIFIED CROPS CAN THRIVE AS THE WORLD WARMS...

Apr 4, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By Alex Kirby / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Rice harvesting in Indonesia. (Curt Caremark / World Bank via Flickr) This piece first appeared at Climate News Network. LONDON—Genetically engineering photosynthesis in plants could take advantage of rising global temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide, US scientists say. They believe this could achieve much higher yields on the same amount of land and help to stave off the prospect of widespread hunger as human populations increase. Researchers at the University of Illinois report in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B on their experiments with an enzyme that can determine the rate of photosynthesis—the way that plants use light to produce oxygen and organic compounds—and a molecule linked to plant growth They say field tests have shown that their...

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THIS PROGRAM WILL MAKE CUTTING CARBON EMISSIONS LUCRATIVE FOR FARMERS...

Mar 30, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Climate by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Mark Isbell   When Mark Isbell, a third-generation rice farmer in central Arkansas, tallies up his profits for this year, he’ll count a few extra dollars from a unique source: the greenhouse gases that his 3,200-acre farm didn’t emit. Isbell is part of a small group of farmers participating in a new project piloted by the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), in conjunction with the USDA, and approved by the American Carbon Registry. The program encourages rice farmers in California and the Mid-South to adopt a series of greenhouse-gas mitigating practices on their fields by allowing them to cash in on the carbon emissions that they offset using California’s carbon market. “You always have to be looking forward,” Isbell told ThinkProgress. “It seems like this is the...

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CLIMATE DISRUPTION IN OVERDDRIVE: SUBMERGED CITIES AND MELTING THAT ‘FEEDS ON ITSELF’...

Mar 28, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Dahr Jamail, Truthout | Report A flooded street sits unused in Elmhurst, Illinois, on July 24, 2010. (Photo: Clark Maxwell)   As the presidential campaign circus dominates headlines across the US, glaring signs the planet is undergoing abrupt anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) abound. A major study published in Nature Climate Change shows that the planet is warming a stunning 50 times faster than when it comes out of an ice age. The implications of the rapidity of this warming, for those who care to digest it emotionally, are horrifying. The study shows that even if carbon reduction targets are achieved and the planet’s temperature is kept below the 2 degree Celsius warming threshold, sea-level rise will still inundate major coastal cities around the world, forcing one-fifth of the total world population...

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CARBON SINKS: THE NEXT BIG THING (PART 3)...

Mar 27, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] THE BLOG HUFFINGTON POST William S. Becker Executive Director, Presidential Climate Action Project This is the 3rd in a four-part post on using ecosystems to store carbon. Part 1 was about the need to bring the Earth’s carbon cycle back into balance. Part 2 discussed how restoring carbon sinks is a necessary part of America’s climate action plan. In this part, I describe why we should not always choose a technical fix to solve environmental problems. The late American critic Lawrence Clark Powell noted, “We are the children of the technological age”. He might have added that like children, we run to technology when we have a problem. We want a technical fix. A technical fix has appeal because it allows people to continue business as usual without the usual consequences — to...

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TRANSFORMING GUANTANAMO FROM PRISON CAMP TO ENVIRONMENTAL PARADISE...

Mar 26, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The U.S. military in Cuba has preserved a unique ecosystem, and now scientists want to turn the notorious detention center into an ecological research center. A stretch of coastline in Cuba’s Guantánamo province. (Photo: DeAgostini/Getty Images) Padma Nagappan is a multimedia journalist who writes about the environment, renewable energy, sustainability, agriculture, and biotechnology. TAKE PART DAILY Can the United States’ notorious Guantánamo Bay prison camp for suspected terrorists be transformed into an American-Cuba research center dedicated to protecting the environment? Joe Roman, a conservation biologist at the University of Vermont, doesn’t think the idea is far-fetched if Guantánamo closes, given the recent progress in normalizing relations with Cuba and President Barack Obama’s historic visit to the Communist country this week Advertisement He says Cuba’s coastline is the “ecological crown jewel” of the Caribbean,...

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THE NETHERLANDS’ NEW DIETARY GUIDELINES TAKE MEAT OFF THE MENU...

Mar 25, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CREDIT: Shutterstock   The Dutch government has a new message for its residents: when it comes to meat, less is more. This week, the Netherlands Nutrition Centre — a government-funded program that creates dietary guidelines — issued a recommendation that people eat no more than two servings of meat per week. According to National Geographic, it’s the first time that the Nutrition Centre has placed a hard limit on the amount of meat a person should consume. The Centre released its recommendations after nearly five years of studying the health and ecological impacts of an average Dutch diet. The new guidelines recommend that a person should consume no more than 500 grams (or a little over a pound) of meat per week. Of that, no more than 300 grams should...

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NOW, EVEN SOIL IS ACCELERATING CLIMATE CHANGE...

Mar 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Tim Radford / Climate News Network  VIA TRUTHDIG     Climate change is being accelerated by gases such as methane emitted by cattle. (Kman999 via Flickr) LONDON—In the great book-keeping of climate change, scientists have just discovered a big mistake. They have been wrong, they now think, to count on the mountains, the plains, the forests and the grasslands as an agency that slows climate change by absorbing carbon dioxide. It does absorb carbon dioxide. But the chilling news is that the soil itself may be making the world warmer. That is because humans have changed the way the landscape and its living things works, and now—thanks to those other greenhouse gases, methane and nitrous oxides, from cattle, fertilisers, manure and agriculture—the terrestrial biosphere is actually accelerating climate change. Twenty-three scientists...

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THIS IS WHAT CLIMATE CHANGE LOOKS LIKE...

Mar 24, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] By grumpynerd   VIA DAILY KOS   Food rioting in Algeria, 2011. Source:Wikimedia.org It’s important to express solidarity with Belgium at this time of grief and fear, but we have to also start thinking longer term about these kinds of events.  One of the overlooked factors leading to the Paris and Brussels attacks is something we’ll be living with a long time: climate change. We have to start making this point: regional political instability and the resulting export of terrorism are climate change problems. And no doubt we’ll be ridiculed for saying that. “Don’t be ridiculous,” some people will say,”the problem is radical Islam.” Well the Assads have ruled over radical Islamists for decades, and have ruthlessly but successfully put down past Islamist risings.  So what was different about 2011?  This was: Source: USDA Now note that...

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SEED BANKS ARE SUPPOSED TO ENSURE FOOD SECURITY, BUT THEY’RE MISSING CRUCIAL PIECES...

Mar 23, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Mari Tefre/ Global Crop Diversity Trust Svalbard Global Seed Vault at night   Seed banks are supposed to be a safeguard against terrible food shocks, a sort of last line of defense if something terrible — a megadrought, a virulent disease, a war — wipes out a staple crop. But a new study found that the banks themselves are missing crucial pieces: crop wild relatives, which contain key genetic diversity that could help domesticated crops adapt to a changing climate. …over 70 percent of the crop wild relatives are not sufficiently preserved in global gene banks In a study published Monday in Nature Plants, a coalition of international scientists embarked on a first-of-its-kind effort to map the representation of crop wild relatives — crops that are genetically...

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MARYLAND BEES JUST CAUGHT A BREAK...

Mar 22, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine  CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: shutterstockMaryland — a state that takes its agriculture seriously — is starting to take its bees seriously, too. The Maryland House passed a bill recently that would implement a partial ban on neonicotinoids, a widely-used class of pesticides that’s been shown to harm honeybees. The bill would still allow farmers to apply neonics on their crops, but would ban everyday consumers from purchasing neonics for their home gardens or other use. The bill comes at a time when managed honeybees — those kept by beekeepers — are seeing major losses in the United States. These bees, as well as wild pollinators like butterflies, wild bees, and birds, are hugely important to the world’s agriculture and to natural vegetation. A report this year on the threats facing wild...

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DRUGS IN THE DRINKING WATER? DON’T ASK AND OFFICIALS WON’T TELL...

Mar 21, 2016 Posted by

[Translate]   By Martha Rosenberg, Organic Consumers Association (Photo: Water Testing via Shutterstock) The lead crisis in Flint, Mich. has drawn national attention to deadly and often underreported risks in the public water supply. Thanks to the chemical, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries, and antiquated water systems, Americans are imbibing a witch’s brew of drugs and chemicals often without realizing it. These contaminants get into the water through human drug waste in sewage, medicines flushed down toilets, agricultural runoff and the wide use of endocrine disruptors like pesticides, flame retardants and plastic-related compounds like phthalates and BPA. (BPA has ironically been used in bottled water that people drink to avoid tap water risks!) When it comes to pharmaceuticals in the water supply, both drug industry and water treatment professionals say traces are so small they...

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METHANE EMISSIONS ARE SPIKING, BUT IT MIGHT BE MORE COW THAN CAR...

Mar 17, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock Since 2006, atmospheric levels of methane — a greenhouse gas 86 times more potent than carbon dioxide over a 20-year period — have steadily been on the rise. For years, scientists weren’t sure what was behind the rising levels of methane, but they had a few ideas: namely an increase in fossil fuel-related emissions. Now, a new study is pointing to a different culprit: agriculture-related methane emissions, especially from livestock and rice production. Published last week in the journal Science, researchers from New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) found that the majority of methane released into the atmosphere since 2006 was produced by bacteria, pointing to sources like agriculture — rather than sources like fossil fuel production or the burning of organic...

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Environment Rainforest Activists Just Scored a Big Win Against One of Pepsi’s Closest Business Partners...

Mar 11, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] The move over palm oil sends a powerful message to investors: unethical companies pose too great a risk. By Reynard Loki Orangutan mother and child in the forest in Indonesia. Photo Credit: Kate Capture/Shutterstock The world’s largest sovereign wealth fund has divested from a major snack food company due to its failure to implement ethical palm oil policies. Norway’s Government Pension Fund Global (GPFG), which is valued at around $880 billion, divested from First Pacific Group Ltd (HK: 0142), the parent company of Indonesia-based Indofood, which has controlling interests in one of the biggest plantation companies in Indonesia tied to conflict palm oil. Conflict palm oil is connected to human rights abuses, forced and child labor, loss of local sustainable food and farming practices, species extinction, habitat destruction, forest and peatland destruction and...

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Supreme Court Refuses To Take Up Case Challenging The Cleanup Of The Chesapeake Bay...

Mar 1, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Alex Dominguez Debris floats in the Chesapeake Bay north of the Bay Bridge on Monday, Sept. 12, 2011 in Sandy Point State Park, Md.   The Chesapeake Bay can forge ahead with its much-needed cleanup plan, after the Supreme Court decided Monday that it wouldn’t be taking up a case challenging the rule. The court’s decision not to take up the case, brought by the American Farm Bureau Federation and other agriculture and business interests, means that a lower court’s decision last July, which found that the effort is legal, stands. The cleanup effort, called the Chesapeake Bay Clean Water Blueprint sets a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for how much nitrogen, phosphorus, and sediment pollution can enter the bay. Under the TMDL, these forms of...

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INCREDIBLE EDIBLE LANDSCAPE MAP SHOWS YOU WHERE TO FIND FREE FOOD...

Feb 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Fruit is abundant if you know where to look. Falling Fruit, a massive collaborative mapping project, provides foragers with the tools they need to track down a nutritious snack. Beyond satisfying the hunger pangs of the present, the initiative provides individuals and communities with a resource through which they can build resilience in the long term. Through the contributions of people all over the world, Falling Fruit is steadily building a map that will guide the hungry towards free food that may otherwise have gone to waste. Falling Fruit was launched in Colorado in 2013 as an open project to which anyone could contribute or access food location information. While Falling Fruit was not the first foraging map online, its creators aspire for it to be the most comprehensive. At latest count, the Falling Fruit map...

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FARMING PRESCHOOL WOULD TEACH KIDS HOW TO GROW THEIR OWN FOOD...

Feb 29, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] INHABITAT by Lucy Wang  INHABITAT In our age of constant digital contact, connecting kids to nature seems more difficult than ever. Fortunately, intrepid thinkers, like Edoardo Capuzzo Dolcetta and his team of Rome-based designers, are envisioning innovative ways to bring children closer to nature. Dolcetta, along with Gabriele Capobianco, Davide Troiana, and Jonathan Lazar, recently won the AWR International Ideas Competition with “Nursery Fields Forever,” a proposal that fuses urban farming with nursery education. Part farm and part school, “Nursery Fields Forever” offers three approaches to learning: learning from nature, learning from technique, and learning from practice. “We think that kids should enjoy nature,” said Edoardo Capuzzo Dolcetta to Fast Company. “So we designed this strange school: No classrooms, but open spaces where vegetables grow inside and animals can come in too. It’s...

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HERE’S WHAT WE SHOULD BE ASKING CLINTON, SANDERS, TRUMP AND CRUZ ABOUT FOOD...

Feb 18, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] REUTERS/Katherine Taylor By Donald Carr GRIST Cross-posted from The Republic of Awesome Let’s assume the nascent “good food” movement had its collective shit together enough to coalesce and organize into a coherent political force like the farm lobby. The Club for Growth has famously hamstrung conservative politicians with its tax pledge and it’s not out of the question to think someday the food movement could exercise the same clout. Yet no one is asking the candidates to talk about food. It’s paramount to get politicians who may have nuanced views on the record. Since a consistent and organized “Food Party” doesn’t yet exist, here’s a no-way-definitive list of what I’d like to ask the candidates about their food and farm policy plans. 1. Michael Pollan, Ricardo Salvador, Mark Bittman, and Olivier De Schutter recently called...

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HEROIC FOOD FARM GIVES VETERANS A NEW MISSION AS FARMERS GROWING SUSTAINABLE FOOD...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] “To be a good farmer, you have to be really good at a lot of things,” says Leora Barish, founder of non-profit veteran farming organization Heroic Food. “What [people] don’t realize is that veterans are great for farms and farming and for our food supply because they have a work ethic like nobody’s business and they have the endurance and they have the mission drive and grit and everything else that are required to start a farm.” Barish started the Heroic Food Farm in the spring of 2015 as a vehicle for teaching and training military veterans in sustainable farming so that they can utilize their unique skills in a new way. Inhabitat recently visited the farm, located just outside of Hudson, NY, to find out more about its inspiring mission as the...

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