56 INDIGENOUS CORN VARIETIES AT RISK AS MONSANTO EYES MEXICO...

Jan 16, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] Lorraine Chow  ECOWATCH Mexico’s unique and treasured native corn varieties could be under threat as Monsanto, the world’s largest seed producer, vies to plant genetically modified (GMO) corn in the country. In August 2015, a Mexican judged overturned a September 2013 ban on GMO corn, thus opening more business opportunities for Monsanto and other agribusinesses pending favorable later court decisions. Monsanto even announced in October 2015 that it was seeking to double its sales in the country over the next five years. Chef Pancho Ibanez of Mexico City-based restaurant Pujol. He joins roughly 80 other Mexican chefs who are speaking out against GMO corn. Photo credit: Financial Times The GMO corn ban remains pending a ruling on the appeal, but a final decision could end up in Mexico’s supreme court. Monsanto, which is seeking five permits to grow...

read more

GROWING POWER GROWS FISH, VEGGIES, AND COMMUNITY WITH AQUAPONIC FARM...

Jan 10, 2016 Posted by

[Translate] by Greg Beach   INHABITAT Gardeners and farmers who live in colder climates are well aware of the limitations posed by a short growing season. But these challenges often yield outstanding innovative practices, such as those used by Growing Power in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Growing Power harnesses natural cycles to power a farm that produces over one million pounds of food every year. Because of its ultra efficient greenhouse system, Growing Power is able to continue its harvest even through the frigid Great Lakes winters. Will Allen, the founder of Growing Power, created an aquaponics system that captures energy produced by natural systems. The greenhouses are heated by indoor compost piles, which generate heat as they break down organic matter. These compost pile heaters are also an excellent source of fertile soil for growing high-quality vegetables...

read more

IT’S PRACTICALLY IMPOSSIBLE TO DEFINE GMO’S...

Dec 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock WTF is a GMO? By Nathanael Johnson   GRIST Debates rage over what to do about genetically modified organisms, but we rarely stop to ask a more basic question: DoGMOs really exist? It’s an important question, because no one in this debate can tell you precisely what aGMO is. I’ve come to the conclusion that “GMO” is a cultural construct. It’s a metaphor we use to talk about a set of ideas. It doesn’t map neatly onto any clear category in the physical world.GMOs, like other cultural constructs — think of gender, or race — do have a basis in reality, of course: We can roughly define “male” or “Asian,” but when we try to regulate these divisions, all kinds of problems crop up. And definitions of “GMOs” are much messier — “nerd” might be a roughly...

read more

HOW CONGRESS’ CRAZY OMNIBUS SPENDING PACKAGE WILL CHANGE WHAT WE EAT...

Dec 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Shutterstock By Nathanael Johnson   GRIST In this era of asymmetrical polarization it seems like laws can only pass in one of two ways: as a massive political effort by one party, overwhelming the best efforts of the other party to stop it (like Obamacare); or as part of a massive bundle of legislation, so that all factions get something they really want — even if they also have to vote for something they hate. The federal funding omnibus, which President Obama signed Friday, is an example of the latter. The bill is just over 2,000 pages long and contains all sorts of miscellaneous legislation, much of which the nation is still sorting through and figuring out. (You don’t really think Congress tells people what’s in these bills before it passes them, do you?) Here’s what it...

read more

The New GMO Apple Is a Health Hazard, but the USDA Approved It Anyway...

Dec 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Food Even the apple industry is opposed to what detractors have dubbed the “botox apple.” Center for Food Safety VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: wk1003mike/Shutterstock.com After decades of promises from the biotech industry that genetically engineered (GE) food would feed the world, cure the sick, reduce agricultural dependence on toxic chemicals, and save countless crops from imminent collapse, the U.S. Department of Agriculture approved a product they think will solve a problem humans have struggled with for centuries… an apple that doesn’t brown when you slice it… Seriously; we couldn’t make this stuff up. While these GE apples are a waste of time and money, we don’t want to downplay the real concerns about them. Pre-sliced apples are actually a frequently recalled food product. Once the whole fruit is sliced, it has an increased risk...

read more

Dozens of Nations Back Regenerative Farming Initiative That Can Help Solve Global Warming...

Dec 15, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Food The U.S.—a primary driver of the climate crisis—still isn’t on board with this historic climate agreement. By Katherine Paul, Ronnie Cummins / AlterNet Photo Credit: GlebStock/Shutterstock.com France, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, the U.K., Germany and Mexico are among more than two dozen countries that have signed on to an agreement that one day may be recognized as the most significant climate initiative in history.France’s 4/1000 Initiative: Soils for Food Security and Climate puts regenerative food and farming front and center in the climate solutions conversation. This is why the Organic Consumers Association, its Mexico affiliate Via Organica, IFOAM Organics International and more than 50 other activist allies across the globe have signed on in support of the Initiative. Unfortunately, the U.S. government is not yet on board with the plan, even though our...

read more

VIDEO: What Does Climate Change Have to Do With Hunger in America?...

Dec 14, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By The Nation On October 27, 2015, the Sacramento Public Library hosted a discussion in honor of The Nation‘s 150th anniversary. In this recording, you’ll see Nation contributor Sasha Abramsky expose just how many Americans go hungry every day in a country that produces more food than any other. Nation environment correspondent Mark Hertsgaard unravels the myth of food scarcity in the face of climate change. Amber Stott, director of Sacramento’s Food Literacy Center  reveals how malnutrition in our own backyards are making children susceptible to previously adult diseases. Chanowk Yisrael, founder of Yisrael Family Urban Farm, outlines his transition from the tech industry to urban agriculture, and the impact of gentrification on food deserts. Lesley McClurg, food and sustainability reporter for Capital Public Radio, moderates the...

read more

THE NATIVE AMERICAN COMMUNITY FACES DANGEROUSLY HIGH RATES OF FOOD INSECURITY...

Dec 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Health by Alex Zielinski THINK PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock/Image by Dylan Petrohilos   It’s been nearly 400 years since the Wampanoag people encountered the starving, cold pilgrims in Plymouth Bay. With an already thriving agricultural model in fertile Massachusetts, the Indigenous tribe taught the uneducated British settlers how to cultivate their own food, eventually culminating in a three-day-long shared meal celebrating the harvest — and securing the future of colonial expansion in the United States. That historical event, which will be memorialized at Thanksgiving tables across the country this week, reflects the fact that Native American tribes were once the most agriculturally prosperous groups of people in the U.S. But a lot has changed over the past several centuries. Now, new studies find that 60 percent of counties with a native majority face dangerously...

read more

How the TPP Fulfills Big Ag’s Wish List...

Dec 6, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The deeply flawed agreement compromises food safety and public health — and opens the possibility for private corporations setting food standards. By Debbie Barker / Center for Food Safety VIA ALTERNET Photo Credit: Lightspring/Shutterstock.com The highly anticipated text of the Trans-Pacific Trade Partnership (TPP), negotiated by 12 countries representing around 40 percent of the global economy, was released on November 12. Center for Food Safety (CFS) is reviewing the agreement consisting of 30 chapters and more than 2,000 pages to assess potential impacts on food safety, genetically engineered foods and crops, food labeling, pesticides and other chemical usage, intellectual property rights pertaining to seeds and pharmaceuticals, and other public health and environmental issues. An initial review reveals that the agreement compromises food safety and public health, notably through measures pertaining to U.S. border inspection...

read more

TERRACE FARMING: AN INDIGENOUS MODEL FOR FOOD SECURITY...

Nov 7, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   By Marianela Jarroud, Inter Press Service | Report Terraces built by Atacameño Indians in the village of Caspana in Alto Loa, in the northern Chilean region of Antofagasta. This ageold farming technique represents an adaptation to the climate, and ensures the right to food of these Andes highlands people. (Photo: Marianela Jarroud / IPS) Caspana, Chile – Terrace farming as practiced from time immemorial by native peoples in the Andes mountains contributes to food security as a strategy of adaptation in an environment where the geography and other conditions make the production of nutritional foods a complex undertaking. This ancient prehispanic technique, still practiced in vast areas of the Andes highlands, including Chile, “is very important from the point of view of adaptation to the climate and the ecosystem,” said Fabiola Aránguiz. “By...

read more

6 Surprising Health Benefits of Hemp Seeds...

Nov 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Hemp is not just for stoners anymore. By Larry Schwartz / AlterNet Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com Among the many benefits of the legalization of marijuana would be eliminating any lingering confusion about the legality of its close relation (read, basically the same plant), hemp. While the possession of industrial hemp, also known by its botanical moniker, Cannabis sativa, has never been illegal, the growing of industrial hemp was illegal until the recent passage of the 2014 Farm Bill. The hemp that is mostly illegal, with the exception, at this writing, of four states and the District of Columbia, the kind of hemp you smoke, put in brownies, and usually have a good ol’ time after imbibing, contains a high concentration (three percent or more) of THC, the ingredient that induces the familiar Rocky Mountain...

read more

COULD BEER SAVE THE HONEYBEES?

Oct 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: wikimedia commons   The fight to save honeybees has gotten boosts recently from the USDA, the White House, and researchers who are still working to determine why managed honeybees continue to die off. Now, bees have one more thing on their side: beer. Or, at least, one of the main ingredients of beer. This week, the EPA approved the use of potassium salts of hops beta acids (HBAs) — a biochemical (or naturally-occurring) pesticide that’s derived from hops, the flowers of the plant Humulus lupulus — around honeycombs. Research has shown that HBAs have potential for repelling varroa mites, a dangerous mite that attaches itself to honeybees and sucks out their circulatory fluid. Varroa mites weaken bees and spread debilitating diseases, including deformed wing virus, which causes...

read more

WHAT AQUACULTURE ACTUALLY IS AND HOW IT’S BENEFITING GREECE...

Oct 10, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] HUFFINGTON POST Aquaculture is commonly defined as the farming of aquatic plants and animals, essentially agriculture at sea. The advent of aquaculture dates back millennia. Evidence of fish capture and on-growing in ponds and lagoons date back to more than 2000 years ago while friezes from ancient Egyptian tombs (tomb of Aktihep) show tilapia being harvested from ponds as far back as 2500BC. In China, the world’s largest aquaculture producing nation, the tradition of raising carp in ponds dates back to 2000BC. There is evidence of extensive marine farms in the 6th century BC in Etruscan culture and in Roman times sea bass, sea bream, mullets and oysters were cultivated in ponds and lagoons in Italy. In the 12th century there was a resurgence of freshwater aquaculture in central Europe. In the 15th...

read more

6 Food Giants That Have Caved in to Consumer Demand to Be Healthier...

Oct 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Food Consumers increasingly want fresh, natural and minimally processed food — and food companies are responding. By Katherine Harris / Food Tank  VIA ALTERNET October 8, 2015 In his Six Rules for Eating Wisely, author Michael Pollan cautions against consuming foods that our great-great-great grandmothers wouldn’t recognize. However, that’s often easier said than done. While a 2015 Nielsen survey indicates that an increasing number of Americans want fresh, natural, and minimally processed foods, Azodicarbonamide, also known as the yoga mat chemical, has been identified in almost 500 food products. Still, the tides are turning as fast casual restaurants, fast food chains, and even multinationals are responding to pressure, especially from Millennials, for food made without artificial ingredients. Here are six leading food companies that are changing their ways for the better. 1. Chipotle...

read more

CARBON IS THE ROOT OF A NEW, SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEM...

Oct 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT  by Jared Green Turning the conventional wisdom on its head, Janine Benyus, author of Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature and founder of the Biomimicry Institute, argued that carbon dioxide pollution in the atmosphere can become the source of a new, regenerative agricultural system at SXSW Eco in Austin, Texas. Instead of treating carbon dioxide emissions as a waste product that needs to be reduced, it can instead fuel our food production. We can mimic the functions of prairie ecosystems to store all of that excess CO2 and create a more sustainable food production system. “Nature has no landfills; everything has a second life,” Benyus argued. Carbon dioxide is already the basis of a complex system of “upcycling” in nature. A tree absorbs carbon dioxide, sequestering it as it grows. When it dies, it’s decomposing trunk is...

read more

SEEDS HAVE BEEN WITHDRAWN FROM THE ARCTIC “DOOMSDAY” VAULT FOR THE FIRST TIME...

Sep 23, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Kif Leswing  FUTURISM 8 hours ago DoomsdayVault2_1024 In Brief International Centre for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas has requested 116,000 seed samples from a seed vault built into an island near the North Pole. The Breakthrough Normally, researchers in the Middle East would simply withdraw the seeds they need from a facility in Aleppo, Syria, but due to the instability in the region they can’t. So instead they’ve turned to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, which was formed in 2008 to save critical seeds and genetics from a natural or man-made disaster. Although the war in Syria might not be at the level of a nuclear war, it’s still the exact reason that the vault was built in the first place. The Implications: The vault has said the researchers will get their...

read more

U.S. CHALLENGED TO REDUCE FOOD WASTE BY 50 PERCENT BY 2030...

Sep 17, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] “Twenty-one percent of all the waste in landfills is food.” By Karen Matthews HUFFINGTON POST GREEN ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK (AP) — Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced a goal Wednesday to cut the amount of food that Americans waste by 50 percent by 2030. “The United States enjoys the most productive and abundant food supply on Earth, so too much of this food goes to waste,” Vilsack said in New York City, where he was joined by food-industry representatives and officials from the Environmental Protection Agency. Vilsack likened the effort to reduce food waste to the anti-littering campaigns of the 1960s and `70s that shamed Americans for tossing trash out car windows. “This is the logical extension,” he said. “This is the next litter campaign.” The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that Americans...

read more

THE BEES HAVE THEIR DAY IN COURT — AND WIN BIG...

Sep 12, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   A federal appeals court overturns the government’s approval of a powerful new pesticide linked to pollinator deaths. (Photo: Derek Davis/Getty Images) Sep 11, 2015Taylor Hill is an associate editor at TakePart covering environment and wildlife.   A federal court has overturned the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s approval of sulfoxaflor, a pesticide linked to the mass die-off of honeybees that pollinate a third of the world’s food supply. The three-judge panel said the EPA green-lit sulfoxaflor even though initial studies showed the product was highly toxic to pollinators such as bees. The chemical compound belongs to a class of insecticides, known as neonicotinoids, that scientific studies have implicated in bee deaths.   “Because the EPA’s decision to unconditionally register sulfoxaflor was based on flawed and limited data, we conclude that the unconditional...

read more

GMO’S: THE EFFECT OF EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES...

Sep 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Melody Meyer HUFFINGTON POSTVice President of Policy and Industry Relations, United Natural Foods (UNFI) In my last post, I uncovered some of the places genetically modified organisms are entering our world and permeating our very lifestyles. It is safe to say that the rapid advances of genetic engineering are transforming our daily lives sometimes unseen and mostly untested. What do we really know about their effects on the environment and our health? Some insist that the technology is safe and to stop being anti-science luddites. Others hold to the precautionary principle. Let’s take a look at some of the consequences being uncovered by scientists around the globe. Here is what we know: Toxins are on the Rise Agricultural Economist and scientist Chuck Benbrook has spent a good portion of his professional career...

read more

INVESTORS ARE GRABBING A JAPAN-SIZE CHUNK OF THE DEVELOPING WORLD FOR FOOD AND WATER...

Aug 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] TAKE PART DAILY Activists tracking these deals say rich countries are buying up land—93 million acres—and displacing local people and wildlife. Employees of Saudi Star rice farm work in a paddy in Ethiopia. (Photo: Jenny Vaughan/AFP/Getty Images) Erica Gies is an independent journalist who writes about the core requirements for life—water and energy—from Victoria, British Columbia, and San Francisco. Bio Foreign investors are increasingly buying or leasing large swaths of developing countries in pursuit of food, water, and profit, according to human rights groups and academics, putting people and the environment at risk. In Papua, Indonesia, forests that have sustained Malind hunter-gatherers for millennia are being razed to make way for foreign-owned biofuels and industrial agriculture plantations in a government scheme called Merauke Integrated Food and Energy Estate, according to awasMIFEE, a U.K.-based...

read more

Four Ways Mexico’s Indigenous Farmers Are Practicing the Agriculture of the Future...

Aug 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Food How can we get the most out of our farmland without harming the planet? I traveled to rural Mexico to learn from indigenous farmers. By Leah Penniman / YES! Magazine  VIA ALTERNET Affectionately called “Professor” by his neighbors, Josefino Martinez is a well-respected indigenous farmer and community organizer from the remote town of Chicahuaxtla, in the Mexican state of Oaxaca. He watched with patient attention as I showed him photographs of Soul Fire Farm, my family’s organic farm in the mountains of upstate New York. I tried to convince Martinez that our farms had a lot in common. “Like you, we have marginal mountain soils and steep slopes, and we’ve worked for years to build up the fertility,” I explained.  Martinez finished his simple breakfast of fresh corn tortillas with black beans....

read more

People Are Dying from Contaminated Food, but Obama and Congress Don’t Seem to Care...

Aug 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] A sweeping food safety reform bill was passed five years ago, but not a single new rule has yet been implemented — and people continue to die. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: Mila Atkovska/Shutterstock.com In 2010, after thousands of Americans were sickened by tainted spinach, peanut butter and eggs, Congress passed the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), a sweeping reform bill that gave the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) new powers to help ensure the safety of the nation’s food system. It was the nation’s first major food policy legislation since FDR signed the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act in 1938. But now, five years later, according to a recent POLITICO investigation, not a single one of the new rules has been implemented and the entire mission has a $276-million funding gap....

read more

THE TRUTH ABOUT BAGGED LETTUCE

Aug 22, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Blue Marble MOTHER JONES Sure, prepackaged salad greens are convenient. But are they good for you and for the planet? —By Kiera Butler I’m a major salad enthusiast. I’m not just saying that to sound virtuous—I really like the stuff, especially when it’s drizzled with balsamic and a good olive oil and paired with a crusty piece of toast. Since we’ve already established that I’m a lazy cook and that I love Trader Joe’s, you probably won’t be surprised to hear that I usually opt for TJ’s bagged lettuce mixes instead of whole heads. Packaged greens are perfect: all the salad, none of the tedious salad spinner. So you can imagine my disappointment when, last week, I heard author Jo Robinson trash bagged lettuce on Fresh Air. (My colleague Tom Philpott recently wrote about...

read more

SELLING UGLY FRUITS AND VEGETABLES COULD BE KEY TO SOLVING AMERICA’S FOOD WASTE PROBLEM...

Aug 20, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Jordan Figueiredo Jordan Figueiredo wants you to be able to buy these amorous carrots wherever carrots are sold.   Every year, 40 percent of the food grown in the United States ends up in the garbage. A lot of that waste happens at the consumer level — according to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), about 25 percent of the food that Americans buy is thrown away. But a lot of that waste also happens between the farm and the grocery store, where strict and sometimes arbitrary cosmetic standards mean that a perfectly nutritious carrot can end up as waste simply because it grew a little imperfectly. To Jordan Figueiredo, that particular sort of food waste — the kind that comes from fresh, nutritious vegetables that end...

read more

NEW MONSANTO SPRAY KILLS BUGS BY MESSING WITH THEIR GENES...

Aug 19, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Tom Philpott   MOTHER JONES B Brown/Shutterstock In a fascinating long piece in MIT Technology Review, Antonio Regalado examines the genetically modified seed industry’s latest blockbuster app in development—one that has nothing to do with seeds. Instead, it involves the industry’s other bread-and-butter product: pesticide sprays. But we’re not talking about the poisonous chemicals you convinced your dad to stop dousing the lawn with. The novel sprays in question are powered by a genetic technology called RNA interference, which promises to kill specific insects and weeds by silencing genes crucial to their survival, while leaving nontarget species unscathed. RNAi, as it’s known, is an emerging science; the two US researchers who discovered it brought home a Nobel Prize in 2006. Regalado describes the process like this: The cells of plants and animals carry...

read more

MEAT EATERS ARE THE NUMBER ONE CAUSE OF WORLDWIDE SPECIES EXTINCTION – STUDY...

Aug 18, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Shutterstock   A meat-inclusive diet often comes with a side of environmental caveats, including livestock’s contribution to global warming, its contribution to deforestation, and the stress it places on a bevy of increasingly precious resources, from water to land. Now, a group of researchers want to add another concern to the meat-eater’s plate: worldwide species extinction. According to a recent study published in Science of the Total Environment by researchers at Florida International University in Miami, livestock production’s impact on land use is “likely the leading cause of modern species extinctions” — a problem the researchers think will only get worse as population growth increases the global demand for meat. The study is particularly interesting to scientists because research linking livestock’s relationship to biodiversity loss has been...

read more

THE MIDWEST’S CORN FIELDS ARE EVEN WORSE FOR THE PLANET THAN WE THOUGHT...

Aug 13, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] PXLated GRIST By Tom Philpott This story was originally published by Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration. I’ve been thinking a lot recently about how fertilizer from the Midwest’s big corn farms seeps into streams and causes trouble — fouling water supplies in Columbus, Toledo, Des Moines, and 60 other towns in Iowa, and generating a Connecticut-sized dead zone at the heart of the continental United States’ most productive fishery, the Gulf of Mexico. (Farms in the region also plant soybeans, but corn is by far the bigger fertilizer user.) But there’s another way the Corn Belt’s fertilizer habit damages a common resource: by releasing nitrous oxide (N2O), a greenhouse gas with nearly 300 times the heat-trapping power of carbon dioxide. It turns out that the region’s farms are likely generating...

read more

DESTRUCTION OF OUR SOIL IS MORE SERIOUS THAN CLIMATE CHANGE...

Aug 9, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]   Press Release: Dr John Baker   An international soil scientist says restocking the world’s arable soil with carbon is more important than climate change. Dr John Baker says too many people around the world treat soil like dirt when it should be revered because “our lives depend on it.” He believes that because soil isn’t sexy, is not on our radar and is metaphorically beneath us, it’s taken for granted by many farmers and ignored by politicians and city dwellers. “Instead people are besotted by climate change when improving soil health and feeding the world is more important,” he says. “Climate change, while serious, is not going to starve you but the rape of our soil over the last 1,000 years through traditional tillage methods, is already leading to reduced crop yields...

read more

FEDERAL JUDGE RULES IDAHO AG-GAG LAW UNCONSTITUTIONAL...

Aug 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Charlie Litchfield, FILE A line of Holstein dairy cows feed through a fence at a farm outside Jerome, Idaho.   On Monday, a federal judge ruled that an Idaho law that prohibits the secret filming of animal abuse at agricultural facilities is unconstitutional, potentially calling into question the validity of such laws across the country. U.S. District Court Judge B. Lynn Winmill found that the law violates the First Amendment, writing in his 29-page ruling that “prohibiting undercover investigators or whistleblowers from recording an agricultural facility’s operations inevitably suppresses a key type of speech because it limits the information that might later be published or broadcast.” The Idaho law is the first “ag-gag” law to be struck down in court — and since the law was...

read more

COLOSSAL GREEN VALUE FARM FLUORISHES WITHIN A FORMER FACTORY IN CHINA...

Aug 1, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] INHABITAT     <p>Your browser does not support iframes.</p> The colossal 2,100 square meter factory has become a testing ground for a number of green ideas.   The colossal 2,100 square meter factory has become a testing ground for a number of green ideas. Within the confines of the space, the studio preserved the original factory features, such as old walls, trees, and natural water access while its existing brick enclosures have been transformed into rooftop agriculture plots. These have been levelled into different heights to create different soil depth suitable for a variety of crops. In addition, an irrigation pond taps into the underground water source in order to enable an integrated sprinkler system. Beyond making a “Little Hong Kong” in Shenzhen, the idea was to curate a dynamic space where self-sufficiency...

read more