Why Going Paperless is a Good Idea: How to Make it Happen...

Oct 31, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] If you think that going paperless in the workplace is a great idea whose time has not quite come, think again: many major companies around the world are taking tangible steps to reduce their carbon footprint and paper usage. Some companies are taking this goal to an extreme: Idea Rebel, a Canadian digital agency, has banned paper completely — employees are not even allowed to drink coffee from paper cups. Other companies that have drastically reduced their use of paper include the Virginia Cancer Institute, which now uses an electronic document management system to handle their scads of medical and financial records, as well as the Cleveland Department of Public Health. Embracing the Paperless Work Style In addition to saving big bucks on reams of copy paper and keeping several dozen trees standing...

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HEMP-BASED INSULATION MAKES A COMEBACK IN BELGIUM...

Oct 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Hempcrete is actually quite similar to concrete, but is carbon negative, waterproof, fireproof, insulates well, and is completely recyclable, making it an optimal green building material. Architect Nikolaas Martens, one of the two co-founders of Martens Van Caimere Architecten, told Dezeen that hempcrete’s sustainable qualities make it an easy choice for home renovations. Related: Nation’s First Hemp House Makes A Healthy Statement “In our projects we try finding solutions to lower the building costs,” he told Dezeen. “In the 1950s, 60s and 70s, Belgians were building houses that were badly or not insulated. So renovating these houses in a sustainable way tends to be expensive. Hempcrete combines the insulation and finishing in one layer, reducing building costs.” “Plus,” he continued, “it is durable and sustainable, because it is made from a waste product.”...

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REHABILITATED PARISIAN BLOCK INCLUDES DAYLIT METAL-CLAD STUDENT HOUSING...

Oct 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Lidija Grozdanic  INHABITAT Student housing never looked so good. French design studio Vib Architecture rehabilitated several buildings in northern Paris, creating a mixed-use development with student housing integrated into the ancient suburb. The apartments are oriented toward the street, while a childcare center occupies the spaces around a quiet and sunny courtyard at the back. But that beautiful metal cladding is what really makes this project shine. Vib’s project organizes several buildings, both new and rehabilitated ones and aims to embody the multifaceted nature of the “Belleville Village”. The student building is organized around the path to the nursery and pedestrian access routes and houses the lobby for the apartments, communal spaces and a bike park. The volume overlooking the park hosts 49 students across seven floors, while the other part of...

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Climate Change Could Make The Persian Gulf So Hot People Can’t Spend More Than A Few Hours Outside...

Oct 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]  by Natasha Geiling Oct 27, 2015 12:54pm CREDIT: Shutterstock Abu Dhabi, capital of the United Arab Emirates.   This summer, a heat wave sent temperatures near the Persian Gulf skyrocketing, with outdoor temperatures reaching as high as 120°F throughout parts of Iraq and Iran. And while those temperatures might seem extreme, a new study published in Nature Climate Change suggests that scorching temperatures could become increasingly common in the region by the end of the century, if climate change is left unchecked. According to the study, outdoor temperatures in the Persian Gulf could reach levels inhospitable to human survival as often as once every decade by 2100, with heat and humidity climbing so high that healthy humans couldn’t survive for more than a few hours outside. This would place a huge amount of...

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HOW WASHINGTON TRANSFORMED ITS DYING OYSTER INDUSTRY INTO A CLIMATE SUCCESS STORY...

Oct 29, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Wikimedia Netarts Bay, in Oregon, where Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery is located.   When Alan Barton first arrived at Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery in 2007, he wasn’t expecting to stay very long. The hatchery — the second-largest in the United States — was in trouble, suffering from historically high mortality rates for their microscopic oyster larvae. But Barton knew that in the oyster industry, trouble is just another part of the job. As manager of the oyster breeding program at Oregon State University, he had already helped one oyster larvae breeding operation navigate through some tough years in 2005, when a bacterial infection appeared to be causing problems for their seeds. To combat the issue, he had created a treatment system that could remove vibrio tubiashii, an...

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ELIZABETH WARREN JUST DECLARED WAR ON ANOTHER SHADY FINANCIAL SERVICES PRACTICE...

Oct 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] By Helaine Olen  MONEYBOX Get ’em. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Tuesday brings us yet another skirmish in the ongoing war between Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and the U.S. financial services industry. The latest front? Annuities. Helaine Olen Helaine Olen is the author of Pound Foolish: Exposing the Dark Side of the Personal Finance Industry and co-author of the upcoming The Index Card: Why Personal Finance Doesn’t Have to Be Complicated. Chances are good that if you’re over the age of 40—and most certainly if you’re older than 50—you’ve been pitched an annuity, or what the insurance industry sometimes terms “guaranteed lifetime income” or “income for life.” You probably received a letter in your mailbox or inbox, suggesting you attend a free meal at someplace like Maggiano’s Little Italy to learn about an exciting “insurance...

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HOW TO RE-WEIRD DESIGN

Oct 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by The Dirt Contributor Can leaving the comfort zone push designers to re-imagine what is possible? Outside Design, an exhibition at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC)’s Sullivan Gallery, shows that the answer to this question is yes. During a talk at the gallery, Jonathan Solomon, director of architecture, interior architecture, and designed objects at SAIC, called for leaving the usual behind and “re-weirding the discipline of design,” which can allow designers and artists to innovate and move beyond disciplinary boundaries. The exhibition is part of the Chicago Architecture Biennial and features the work of five firms of artists and designers: Analog Media Lab (Urbana-Champaign, Illinois), Ants of the Prairie (Buffalo, New York), The Living and the Ali Brivanlou Lab (New York City), Species of Space (Chicago), and Sweet Water...

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SAUDI ARABIA PLOTS OUT A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE...

Oct 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE DIRT BY JARED GREEN “If Saudi Arabia can do this, any place can,” said Anica Landreneau, director of sustainable consulting at multi-disciplinary design firm HOK, at SXSW Eco in Austin, Texas. The conservative Muslim country is planning a move away from oil towards clean energy and a shift away from a totally car-centric environment to one that offers public transit and encourages walking and biking. Saudi Arabia realizes it must go green to survive. Saudi Arabian government officials see peak oil coming by 2028, with exports declining precipitously after that. This is a major issue for the Saudi Arabian economy because oil accounts for 80 percent of total gross domestic product (GDP). In addition, Saudi Arabia, with a population of 28 million, expects to have 35 million more people by 2040. This...

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EXCLUSIVE: Elevated CO2 Levels Directly Affect Human Cognition, New Harvard Study Shows...

Oct 28, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Joe Romm CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: Climate Interactive   In a landmark public health finding, a new study from the Harvard School of Public Health finds that carbon dioxide (CO2) has a direct and negative impact on human cognition and decision-making. These impacts have been observed at CO2 levels that most Americans — and their children — are routinely exposed to today inside classrooms, offices, homes, planes, and cars. Carbon dioxide levels are inevitably higher indoors than the baseline set by the outdoor air used for ventilation, a baseline that is rising at an accelerating rate thanks to human activity, especially the burning of fossil fuels. So this seminal research has equally great importance for climate policy, providing an entirely new public health impetus for keeping global CO2 levels as low as possible....

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Burn Pits: The New ‘Agent Orange’ That the Media Has Failed to Expose...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The American media has remained silent on the health impact of toxic military ‘burn pits’ from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. By Brian Bienkowski / Environmental Health News   VIA ALTERNET October 21, 2015 Photo Credit: Department of Defense The U.S. media has failed to expose the civilian toll of recent wars by largely ignoring burn pits’ toxic effects on local people, a U.S. researcher argues in a new report, suggesting the burn pits are this generation’s Agent Orange. The coverage gap helps legitimize war and overlooks the undeniable humanitarian impacts, said Eric Bonds, an assistant professor of sociology and researcher at the University of Mary Washington. During the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, things such as plastics, Styrofoam, electronics and unexploded weapons were burned in large pits, sending toxics into the air and people’s...

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What the Steve Jobs Movie Won’t Tell You About Apple’s Success...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Think the iPhone is just a product of Silicon Valley magic? Think again. By Lynn Stuart Parramore / AlterNet   Photo Credit: Shutterstock Mariana Mazzucato is a professor in the Economics of Innovation program at the Science Policy Research Unit of the University of Sussex. Her widely acclaimed book, The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths, reveals the critical role that we, the taxpayers, play in the creation of the most exciting innovations of our time through publicly funded investment. (The new U.S. edition hits the shelves October 27.) Mazzucato debunks common myths about how innovation works and shapes a new narrative on how to grow a robust and inclusive economy. Think that iPhone in your pocket is simply a product of Silicon Valley magic? Think again! (This interview was originally posted on...

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25 Years After America’s Biggest Nuclear Cleanup Project Began, Not a Single Drop of Waste Has Been Treated...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] The largest and most costly U.S. environmental cleanup project has been dogged for years by worries about an accidental nuclear reaction or a spill of toxic materials that could endanger residents nearby, as well as a history of contractor retaliation against workers who voice worries about persistent safety risks. But it hasn’t fully turned the corner yet, according to recent comments by the federal officials now overseeing its operation. “Changing the culture takes time,” said Mark Whitney, the Department of Energy’s assistant secretary for environmental management, at a special hearing last week before members of an independent federal watchdog group that monitors safety problems at federal nuclear facilities. “I’m not going to sit here today and tell you we have everything solved.” Whitney spoke inside a ballroom at the Three Rivers Convention Center...

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Buckle Up: Scientists Warn of Dozens of Global Warming Tipping Points That Could Trigger Natural Disasters...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Environment Rising surface temperatures due to climate change could ultimately rearrange the planet’s ecosystems. By Reynard Loki / AlterNet Photo Credit: sakepaint/Shutterstock.com Rising surface temperatures due to climate change could have grave consequences for human life. An international group of scientists has pinpointed 41 specific places around the globe where abrupt temperature changes could trigger natural disasters affecting ocean currents, sea ice, snow cover, tundra permafrost and terrestrial biosphere. The scientists cite environmental neglect and over-exploitation of the Earth’s resources as the main contributing factors. These “global warming tipping points” include regions that host critical elements of Earth’s planetary system, such as the Amazon forest and the Tibetan plateau. While none of the areas implicated in the study are located near any major cities, the potential impact to the planet could still be grave,...

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NEW TALENT: LAB.PRO.FAB

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Metropolis Magazine October 2015 The Caracas–based architects champion a bottom-up approach that strengthens community ties and puts good design in the hands of the public. A.J.P. Artemel Nominated by Martino Stierli Built into the hillside of one of Caracas’s most populated areas, the Programmatic Platform stands out as a symbol of community. Courtesy Iwan Baan Living in informal settlements poses many challenges, including limited access to basic services like water and electricity, lack of landownership or land-use regulations, and the need to build shelter efficiently and inexpensively. But because of this, these neighborhoods—home to between a quarter and a third of the world’s urban population—are a laboratory for some of the most innovative, sustainable, and reproducible construction techniques. It is this design spirit that Caracas, Venezuela-based LAB.PRO.FAB promotes in LAB.PRO.FAB—The Public Machinery, a series of community projects for...

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BUY NOTHING DAY

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] David Friedlander   LIFE EDITED Behavior REI Is Making Black Friday a Bit Brighter There is no single day that better represents the scourge of compulsive, compulsory consumption than Black Friday–historically the biggest shopping day of the year. The day compels many to camp out in front of stores in frigid temperatures to nab limited time offers on retail goods; it sends workers to work extra long hours that would otherwise be spent partaking in post-thanksgiving revelry; and it brings out some pretty nasty human behavior: in the last decade, seven people have died and 98 have been injured in Black Friday related shopping incidents. These are not people shopping for life-saving serums–these are people pursuing deals on flatscreen TVs and remote control cars for their kids. Well, outdoor retailer REI is taking a stand against...

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GOVERNOR WRESTLES WITH HIS OWN MORTALITY, SIGNS “DEATH WITH DIGNITY” LAW...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Tara Culp-Ressler CREDIT: Shutterstock California will become the largest state to allow terminally ill residents to end their lives with the approval of a doctor, after Gov. Jerry Brown (D) added his signature to a long-awaited piece of legislation on Monday. The California legislature initially approved the so-called “right-to-die” bill more than a month ago after a contentious political campaign surrounding the measure. The Catholic Church came out in opposition to the bill, though major medical groups did not. It was unclear whether or not Brown — who is a former Jesuit seminarian — would approve the legislation. In a letter addressed to lawmakers on Monday, the governor was frank about wrestling with the decision. He said he read appeals from people on both sides of the issue, consulted a Catholic bishop,...

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WHY THIS REPUBLICAN SENATOR JUST CAME OUT IN SUPPORT OF OBAMA’S CLIMATE RULE...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Natasha Geiling CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Andrew Harnik Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H.   As soon as the EPA’s Clean Power Plan hit the Federal Register, the rule was met with a flurry of lawsuits from fossil fuel-producing states, utility groups and the coal industry. Republicans in Congress have pledged to block the rule, and could try to kill the rule through the Congressional Review Act this week. But in a chorus of Republican opposition, the Obama administration won a new ally over the weekend, when Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) became the first Republican senator to openly voice support for the Clean Power Plan. “It’s so important that we protect New Hampshire’s beautiful environment for our economy and for our future,” Ayotte said in a statement on Sunday, following an interview with New Hampshire...

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THIS BILL MIGHT BE THE MOST CREATIVE ATTEMPT YET TO KILL THE CLEAN POWER PLAN...

Oct 27, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Samantha Page CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/Susan Walsh Re. Thomas Marino (R-PA), pictured in 2011, has introduced a bill that would change some subtle wording of the Clean Air Act, while simplifying the law’s code.   The Clean Power Plan, published in the Federal Register on Friday, is already the subject of a legal challenge by 24 states. But on Tuesday, legislators on the House Judiciary Committee will mark up a bill that could take a more roundabout way of subverting the EPA rule. H.R 2834, sponsored by Rep. Tom Marino (R-PA), is a relatively straight-forward, if somewhat odd, bill. It takes the Clean Air Act — a comprehensive environmental protection law that the EPA says is responsible for reducing pollution from six common pollutants by nearly 70 percent since 1970 —...

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THE RAINFORESTS HOLD THE KEY TO TAMING EL NINO’S DESTRUCTION...

Oct 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] THE GUARDIAN Healthy forests protect our climate and moderate our weather. As the ‘Godzilla’ El Niño builds in the weeks ahead of Paris talks, it is a timely warning that deforestation is partly to blame for its impacts Analyses from Noaa and Nasa confirm that El Niño is strengthening and that it looks a lot like the strong event that occurred in 1997–98. Photograph: Noaa/Nasa Deborah Lawrence Lawrence is an environmental sciences researcher at the University of Virginia   Indonesia is smouldering and Godzilla is to blame. But even though this is reality, not a monster movie, there is still a hero: the tropical rainforest. This year’s El Niño, the ocean-traveling climate cycle notorious for throwing the weather off kilter, is nicknamed “Godzilla”. While it is projected to deliver plenty of rain to...

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COULD BEER SAVE THE HONEYBEES?

Oct 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Katie Valentine CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: wikimedia commons   The fight to save honeybees has gotten boosts recently from the USDA, the White House, and researchers who are still working to determine why managed honeybees continue to die off. Now, bees have one more thing on their side: beer. Or, at least, one of the main ingredients of beer. This week, the EPA approved the use of potassium salts of hops beta acids (HBAs) — a biochemical (or naturally-occurring) pesticide that’s derived from hops, the flowers of the plant Humulus lupulus — around honeycombs. Research has shown that HBAs have potential for repelling varroa mites, a dangerous mite that attaches itself to honeybees and sucks out their circulatory fluid. Varroa mites weaken bees and spread debilitating diseases, including deformed wing virus, which causes...

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FLORIDA SUPREME COURT CLEARS HURDLE OUT OF THE WAY FOR SOLAR POWER TO FLOURISH...

Oct 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] by Erin Auel – Guest Contributor  CLIMATE PROGRESS CREDIT: AP Photo/John Raoux In this Wednesday, May 13, 2015 photo, Henry Plange, a power generation engineer, checks temperatures of solar panels at the Space Coast Next Generation Solar Center, in Merritt Island, Fla. Industry experts rank Florida third in the nation in rooftop solar energy potential but 13th in the amount of solar energy generated.   Solar power could soon be flourishing the Sunshine State. Thursday morning the Florida Supreme Court approved an initiative for the 2016 ballot that would allow Floridians to vote to reduce the state’s restrictions on rooftop solar power. Although solar is growing exponentially nationwide, it has not thrived in Florida. Florida is one of a handful of states that prohibit residents from purchasing electricity from a source other than...

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BACA ARCHITECTS’ AMPHIBIOUS HOUSE PROTECTS INHABITANTS FROM FLOODING...

Oct 26, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] INHABITA  all images courtesy of baca architects       baca architects has completed the what is believed to be the UK’s first amphibious home, built along a picturesque stretch of the river thames. named ‘formosa’, the three-storey dwelling is located in a designated flood zone and can ascend up to 2.7 meters to cope with increasing water levels. as the river rises, a concrete dock below the structure gradually fills up, gently elevating the building. the three-storey dwelling is located in a designated flood zone and can rise up to 2.7 meters       as a result of the design’s buoyant properties, the floor level is set only 1 meter above the ground, rather than the more standard 2 meter deficit for static homes. despite being designed with minimal moving parts,...

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ARTIST FILLS THE VAULTS OF A DILAPIDATED 1924 BANK IN CHICAGO WITH BOOKS AND ARTWORK...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Architecture by Lidija Grozdanic   INHABITAT What happens when you fill bank vaults and offices with books and artwork instead of money? These pictures of the Stony Island Arts Bank in Chicago show a former bank now functioning as a vibrant destination for artists, scholars, curators and collectors. Renovated by non-profit Rebuild Foundation, the 1923 building is meant to function as a place where people can engage with South Side history. The 20,000-square-foot building was originally designed by William Gibbons Uffendell for a savings and loan banking institution. It has been closed for decades until artist Theaster Gates, founder of Rebuild Foundation, decided to restore it. He completely retrofitted the building and preserved some of the historical elements, such as the rusted vault and cracked plaster moldings. The 1923 building was converted into “a...

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SUSTAINABLE OCEAN FARMING INNOVATORS WIN THE 2015 BUCKMINSTER FULLER CHALLENGE...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Design by Lucy Wang INHABITAT The Buckminster Fuller Institute just crowned the non-profit GreenWave winner of the 2015 Fuller Challenge for developing the world’s first multi-species 3D ocean farms – a type of sustainable aquaculture that produces high yields while restoring and improving the ocean’s ecosystems. The non-profit will receive a $100,000 grand prize towards the implementation of their work. Our oceans are being plundered. With recent studies suggesting that humans have caused marine populations to halve, largely due to overfishing, alternative solutions like those proposed by GreenWave are a lifeline to the billions of people who depend on the oceans’ biodiversity. GreenWave’s new approach to farming the seas rejects the traditional practice of growing vulnerable monocultures for a multi-layered system akin to a vertical underwater garden. GreenWave’s open-source strategy takes advantage of...

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THE CLIMATE CHANGE FIX WE NEED: WE’LL NEVER SOLVE THE PROBLEM UNTIL WE DO THIS...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] We can’t solve global warming until we fix our politics. Here’s how we start Jedediah Purdy   SALON.COM   Topics: Climate Change, Global Warming, Books, Democracy, Editor’s Picks, Sustainability News The climate change fix we need: We’ll never solve the problem until we do this (Credit: AP/Reuters/Gary Cameron/Joe Skipper/Jose Luis Magana) Democracy has not been doing well. For this reason, now is an awkward time to argue that it must be the fulcrum of the Anthropocene. In the United States and Europe, democracies have rushed into foolish wars and stumbled in the face of economic crises—or created those crises. At the time of writing, the North Atlantic democracies are splitting into elite technocrats, who wish they could govern without consulting the masses, and angry populists, who would like to liquidate the technocrats. Nondemocratic governments...

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WHY WE HUG THE EDGE OF OPEN SPACES...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Nikos A. Salingaros   METROPOLIS POINT OF VIEW The portico of San Luca, Bologna, Italy, built 1674-1793. This 4 kilometer-long structure consisting of 666 arches has but a single purpose: to define a sheltered path to the Church of San Luca on the hill. Drawing by Nikos Salingaros Human biology, an artifact of our evolution, dictates much of how we behave, and offers the key to how space is actually used. Interactions with the built environment determine our behavior, often in surprising and mysterious ways. For example, people tend to avoid exposed open space and prefer to walk along its protected edges or perimeter boundaries (Salingaros, 2005: pages 32-33). Ann Sussman and Justin Hollander (2015) discuss the mechanism of thigmotaxis, defined as how organisms move in response to edge conditions: research finds that not just humans...

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DESIGNING FOR THE HEALTH-CONSCIOUS OFFICE...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Tamy Cozier  METROPOLIS MAGAZINE The interior design of an office can contribute to its employees’ health through quiet rooms and connections to nature. Courtesy Drew Kelly Interior design today goes well beyond mere aesthetics. In fact, the profession has changed tremendously in the past decade with practitioners being expected to solve complex problems such as encouraging healthy behaviors and creating multigenerational homes and workplaces. Metropolis recently spoke to the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), and Randy Fiser, ASID CEO, about their take on the field today and its role in health and wellness. After completing its 2015/2016 Outlook and State of the Industry report earlier this year, ASID was poised to give well-informed answers, backed by recent statistics. Tamy Cozier: How can interior design affect health and productivity? Randy Fiser: Interior designers create the spaces where we spend 93...

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CLIMATE CHANGE MORE CATASTROPHIC FOR THE GLOBAL ECONOMY THAN WE THOUGHT...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Mike Poresky By Clayton Aldern GRIST When it comes to climate change, the dark truth is that most people couldn’t care less about it crippling the environment. So instead, let’s talk about something people tend to think about: dollars. A new study, published in Nature on Wednesday, suggests in pretty strong terms that climate change will do some serious wallet damage on a global scale. On average, the authors predict we’ll see a 23 percent reduction in projected global output by 2100 due to climate change (relative to a world without it). Until now, that kind of catastrophic shock to the economy was considered to be more or less a worst-case scenario — but now, it’s looking like it might be par for the course. “Historically, people have considered a 20 percent decline in...

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HOW TO SAVE THE PERSIAN GULF’S DYING CORAL REEFS...

Oct 25, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Rampant development has killed off 70 percent of the region’s life-giving reefs. The Palm Jumeirah development in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (Photo: Matthias Seifer/Reuters) TAKE PART DAILY Richard Conniff is the author of The Species Seekers: Heroes, Fools, and the Mad Pursuit of Life on Earth and other books.   If you want to see the rapid and disastrous effects of ignoring environmental science, it would be hard to find a more discouraging example than the Persian Gulf. It’s a small, shallow, salty body of water, bottled up at its southern end by the 29-mile-wide Straits of Hormuz, and researchers have been warning for more than 30 years about the inevitable consequences of careless development. Those warnings have gone almost entirely unheeded as the eight oil-rich nations bordering the Gulf have rushed to...

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THESE SPECIES SURVIVED THE LAST ICE AGE BUT COULDN’T SURVIVE PEOPLE...

Oct 24, 2015 Posted by

[Translate] Chip Gallent By Suzanne Jacobs   GRIST Screw Myers and Briggs. I’ve got a new personality test for you. Read the following statement and choose the response that most accurately depicts how it makes you feel: Statement: Ten thousand years ago, 22 species of birds, reptiles, and mammals on the Bahamian island of Abaco miraculously survived the rising seas and shifting climate at the end of the last ice age. Then, 1,000 years ago, humans showed up and took them out like trash on pick-up day. Responses: A) Damn right! Humans are and forever will be the masters of this planet. B) Humans are everything that’s wrong with this world, and the sooner we die off, the better. C) Interesting … I wonder why this happened and what it means for species now dealing with both humans and climate change. Now,...

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